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http://www.archive.org/details/documentaryjourn18571indi 



II 



REPORTS 



OP THE 



OFFICERS OF STATE 



OF 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 



TO THE GOVERNOR, 



FOR 



THE YEAR 1857. 



PART FIRST. 



INDIANAPOLIS 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE FRINTER, 
1857. 



t. 






INDEX TO PART FIRST. 



FA0> 

Ileport. of Agent of State 3 

Report of Treasurer of State IO3 

Report of Auditor of State HI 

Report of Commissioner of the Sinking Fund , 285 

Report of Superintendent of Public Instruction , 291 






I 






Doc. ]N"o. 1.] 



[Part I. 



ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF THE 



OF THE 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BIIVGHAM, STATE PRINTER 



1 D. J.— 1. 



1S5 7 



I 



REPORT. 



OFFICE OF AGENT OF STATE, 

No. 27 Wall Street, New York, Nov. 1, 1S57. 

To His Excellency, A. P. Willard, 

Governor of the State of Indiana : 

Sir : — I herewith transmit my Annual Report of the condition ot" 
the Public Debt, together with an abstract of Bonds surrendered, 
Transfers made, Interest paid and unpaid, Expenses of the Agency, 
and an abstract of the Sinking Fund Register, for the fiscal year 
ending Oct. 31, 1857: 

Bonds Surrendered. 

There was outstanding on the 1st of Nov., 1856, 425 

bonds of $1,000 each $425,000 00 

There has been surrendered since that time 11 bonds 

of $1,000 each ■ 11,000 00 



$414,000 00 

Five per cent. State Stock. 

There had b.^en issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to the Ist day of November, 1856 5,306,500 00 

There has been issued since that time on same ac- 
count 5,500 00 



Making total issued on 1st of Nov., 1S57. • • $5,312,000 00 



t 

Two-and-a-half per cent. State Stock. 

There had been issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to Ist Nov., IS56 2,040,811 00 

There has been issued since that lime on same ac- 
count 4.2 G'? 50 

/ 

Making total issued on 1st Nov., 1857 • • • 2,045,073 50 

Five per cent. Preferred Canal Stock. 

There is outstanding of this Stock same as reported 

last year - - > • . • 4,079.500 00 

Five per cent. Preferred Special Canal Stock. 

There is outstanding of this Stock same as reported 

last year ......... 1,2I(>,737 50 

Five per cent. Deferred Canal Stock. 

There had be^^n issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to 1st Nov., 1S56 1,227.000 00 

There has been issued since that time on same ac- 
count 5,5()0 00 

1,232,500 00 

Five per cent. Deferred Special Canal Stock. 

There had| been issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to 1st Nov., 1856 465,582 50 

There has been issued since that time on same ac- 
count 4,262 50 

Making total issued on 1st Nov., 1857 $469,845 00 

JOHN M. LORD, 

Agent of State. 



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37 

LIST of Certificates of Iiuliava Five per cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of November^ 
1857. 



TO AVIIOM ISSUED. 



REMAEK3. 



John II. Engelbei-ts 

Ilaplman Eai'le 

Muiie & Kanz 

John IloivarJ March 

do do 

Auditor of the State of Indiana in 
trust for the Camlirid^e City 
Bank 

John T. Rollins 

John Howard March 

John T. Rollins 

Elvira C. King ley 

John T. Rollins 

Mrs. Elvira C. Kingsley 

E . Ludlow, Cash 

Tieisurer of the State of Wisconsin 
in trust for the Bank of ton du 
Lac 

Cammann & Co 

K. Whitehouse, Son & Morrison 

The Treasurer of the State of Wis- 
consin in trust for the Bank of Ri- 



pou , 



The Treasurer of the State of Wis- 
consin in trust for the Bank of III- 
pou ; . . . . 

The Treasurer of the State of Wis 
consin in trust for the Bank of Ri 
pou 

Johd Lockie 

Jno. & Ed. Ferguson in trust with 
benefit of survivorship 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio in 
trust for The Merchants, Bank 
Massilon 

G. A. Rollins 

El vira C . Kingsley 

Cammann & Co 

The Emigrant Industrial Savings 
Bank 

The Central Bank of Wisconsin . 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio 
in trust for the Starke County 
Bank 

Atwood & Co 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Chas Oould 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio in 
trust for the Franklin Bank, Por 
ta:,'e County, Ohio 

Th'> State Treasurer of the S-ate of 
^Vi30onsin in trust for The Cen- 
tral Bank of Wisconsin at Jones 
viUe 

D. Dan. E. Benkeiidorf 

Al'.iert Zahel , 

Carpenter & Vermilye 

The State Treasurer of the State 
of Wisconsin in trust for the Bank 
of Osh Kosh 

East River Savings Bank 

Car)ienti;r & Vermilye 

James G. King &. Sons 



1,000 00 
5,U00 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 
5,000 00 



8,500 00 
3,000 00 
2,.500 00 
2,500 00 

500 00 
2,000 00 

500 00 
2,000 00 



9,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 



5,000 00 



5,000 00 



5.000 00 
500 00 



500 00 



10,000 00 
3,000 OO 
1,000 00 
6,000 OO 

30,000 00 
3,000 00 



0,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 

1,000 00 
1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

5t0 00 



3,000 00 

91)0 00 
1,000 00 
1,100 00 



10,000 00 

12,000 00 

900 00 

6,000 00 



Nov. 1, 1856. 

Nov. 3, 1856. 

Nov. 5, 1856. 

Nov. 6, 18.56. 

Nov. 8, 1856. 

Nov. 14, 1856. 
Nov. 17, 1856. 

Nov. 24, 1853. 

Nov. 25, 1856. 

Nov. 28. 1856. 



Dec. 1, 1850. 
Dec. 3, 1856. 



Dec. 6, 1856. 
Dec. 8, 1858. 



Bee. 9, 1853. 
Dec. 12, 185S. 



Dec. 13, 1853. 



Dec. 23, 1856. 
Jan. 5, 1857. 



Jan. 6, 1857. 
Jan. 7, 1857. 



Jan. 9, 1857. 
Jan. 12, 1857. 



For Bonds Burreudcrea. 



For Bonds 8<uTindcrecl 



38 

LIST of Certificates of Indiana Five jjcr cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day o-f November, 
1857.— Continued. 



No. 



98C0 



2801 
9812 
2803 
2804 
28(5 
28.C 
SSJT 
28Ci8 
2809 
2810 
2811 
2812 
2813 
2814 
2615 



2817 



SSlfi 
2819 

2820 



2821 
2S2-2 

28?3 
2824 
3825 

2r«C 

2827 
28^ 



2829 
9630 
8831 
2632 
S833 
9834 
S835 
9830 
2837 
9838 
9830 

9840 
2841 

2842 
«243 



S844 
2845 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



Auditor of the State of Ohio in trust 
for the Franklin Bank of Portage 
County 

E:ist Kiver Savings Bank 

E. S. Munroe 

do 

E. LuJlow, Cash 

Ij uisa Oakley 

F. V. A. Rusc'i, in trust 

W. C. De Pamv 

Farquhar Jameson 

George E. Bahlwin 

C . W . Vornrerck 

Mei.rs & Greenleaf 

E. Luiilow, Cash 



The Treasurer of the State of TVis 
consin in trust for the Oshkosl 
Commercial Bank 

The Tre;isurer of the State of Wis 
consin in trust for the Oshkosh 
Commercial Bank 

Tlie Treasurer of the State of W 
consin in trust for the Oshkosh 
Commercial Bank 

Meigs & Greenleaf 

Ward & Co 

James Richnrdson, Bank Agent, 
in trust for the German Bank 
Sheboygan 



Wm. Smee, Esq., of the Bank of 
England, London 

James G. King & Sous 

W. II. Neilson 

James G. King &. Sons 

do do 

do do 

The State Treasurer of the State of 
Wisconsin in trust for the German 
Bank, Sheboygan 

J. G. King & Sons 

Adams & Buckingliam 

Dr. Dan. E. Beukendorf 

.lames G . King & Sons 

Adams & Buckingham 

James G. King & Sons 

do do 

Miss Eliza Woodley Postlc 

J. G. King fc Sons 

do 

Wm. Smee, Esq.. of the Bank of 
England. London 

.lami;s G. King & Sons 

F. Esperandien intrust for estate of 
E. liolli 

James G. Kint' & Sons 

Wm. Louis Winans, Esq., of Balti 
more, Maryland, at ])resent resi 
ding in St. I'cters'iurg, Ilussia. ... 

Wm. Louis Winans Es'j., of Balti- 
more, .Md., at jiresent residirjg i 
St. I'eterstiurg, Russia 

Wm. Louis Winans Esq., of Bait 
more, Md., at present residing i 
St. Petersburg, Rus'ia 



15,000 00 
1,000 CO 
1,500 00 
900 00 
8,400 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 CO 
1,000 00 

10,500 CO 

1.000 00 

1,000 00 
3,000 00 
10,000 CO 



5,000 CO 



5,000 00 



5,000 CO 

COO (10 

1,000 00 



3,000 00 



3,000 00 
3, GOO 00 
2,000 00 

11,000 00 
4,5110 00 

10,000 00 



3,000 CO 

2,.500 00 

10,000 00 

000 00 

1,900 00 
10,000 00 

5,000 00 
34,000 00 

0,000 (!() 
20,000 00 

9,500 00 

500 00 
1,400 00 

2,000 00 
500 00 



20,000 00 
20,000 00 
20,000 CO 




Jan. 12, 1P57. 
Jan. 13, 1857. 

Jan. 15, 1S57. 
Jan. IG, 1857. 
Jan. 17, 1857. 

Jan. 22, 1F57. 
Jan. 23, 1857. 

Jan. 24, 1857. 



Jan. 28, 1S57 



Jan. 29, 1857 



Jan. 31, 1F57. 
Feb. 3, 1857. 
Feb. 4, 18.57. 
Feb. 5, 1857. 
Feb. 9, 1857. 



Feb. 13, 1857. 



Feb. 14, 1S57. 

Feb. IG, 1857, 
Feb. 18, 1857 
Feb. 21, 1857 

Feb. 19, ^^r,: 

Feb. 25, 1857 
Fel). 20, 1857 

March 2, 1P57 



March 3, 1F57. 
March 4, 18.57. 



REMARKS. 



Canceled. 



Canceled. 



39 

LIST of Certificates of Indiana Five per cent. State Stock, issued 
from the 1st day of October, 1856, to the Sl-si day of Nooember, 
1857.— Continued. 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



Wm. Lewis Wynang, Esq.. of Baiti 
more, Md., at in'esent I'esldin;^ in 
St. Petei-sliui-gh, Russia 

Wm. Lewis Wynaus, Ksq., of Balti- 
more, M !., at present residing in 
St. Peters' iurgh, Russia 

Corning & Co 

Winslow, Lanier & Co 

John and Ed. Ferguson, with benefit 
of survivorship 

John and Ed. Ferguson, with benefit 
of survivorship 

John and Ed. FeVguson, with benefit 
of survivorship 

Meijis <5t Greenleaf 

Stebliins & Bloodgood 

The Treasurer of the St'ite of AVi 

, consin in trust for the Central Uank 
of Wisconsin 

Corning & Co 

Dr. Daniel E. Benkendorf 

Frank Taylor 

Cammann & Co 

Joseph Drake 

Oddie & St. (ieorge 

Adolphus Bach 

Eloisa Kingsley 

Cornins & Co 

P, C. Calhoun, executor of estate of 
II. K. Ilarrall 

The Treasurer of the State of Indian: 
in trust for the Indiana Bank, Mad- 
ison 

The Treasurer of the State of Ind 
ana in trust for the Kentucky Stock 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Cambridge City 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Lagrange Bank. 
Lima 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Indi 



The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of 
Goshen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for t!ie Prairie City Bank, 
Terre Haute 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Southern Bank of 
Indiana 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Bank, 
Loiansport 

T;ie Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Farmers Bank 
of Westfield 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Canal Bank, 
Evansville 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Salem Bank, 
Goshen 



Amount. 


Date. 


20,CC0 00 


March 4, 


1857. 


20,000 00 






2,000 00 


March 5, 


1857. 


8,000 00 






8,000 00 


March G, 


1857. 


5,000 00 


March 9, 


1857. 


3,000 00 
500 00 


March 13 


1857. 


e,ooo 00 






3,000 00 

1,000 00 

.)00 00 


March 17 
March 21 


1857. 
1857. 


4,000 00 


JIarch 23 


lc57. 


!,(I00 00 






3,0(0 00 


Marc'-i 26 


1857. 


.500 to 


j 




0,5(10 00 






500 00 


March 27 


J857. 


5,000 00 






0,000 00 


March 23, 


1857. 


50,500 CO 


March 30, 


1657. 


20,500 00 






33,500 CO 






67,000 00 






9,000 00 






CO,OCO (10 






21,000 00 






C5,000 CO 






40,000 CO 






15,500 00 






5,500 CO 






44,000 CO 






500 00 







REMARKS. 



40 

LIST of Certificates of IiuUana Five j^er cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Z\st day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of November, 
1857. — Continued. 



TO ^yIIOM ISSUED. 



The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
an;i in trust for the Kentucky Stock 
Bank. Columbus 

Adiims & Buckingham 

Geo. II. Contoit 

Adams & Buckingham 

The Washington Insurance Co. . .. 

The Kast Kiver Saviusrs Institution 
do. do. 

Frank Taylor 

Maxwell & Co 

II. T. Morgan& Co 

Augustine Asselin VDomerque. . .. 

The East River Savings Institution 

John Thomiison 

AVainnright & Morris 

The St it's Treasurer of the State of 
Wisconsin in trust for the Colum 
I'ia County Bank 

The State Treasurer of the State of 
Wisconsin in trust for the Colum- 
1 ia County Bank 

The State Treasurer of the Stite of 
AVisconsin in trust for the Colum 
1 ia County Bank 

Wintlow, Lmier & Co 

Carpenter & Vcrmilye 

Ward & Co 

The Treasure!- of the State of AVis 
corsin, in trust for the German 
Bank 

James Winslow 

do. 

do. 

do. 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio, ii 
trust for Savings Bank of Cincin- 
nati 



Duncan, Sherman &, Co . 



The Treasurer of the State of Iniii- 
ana in trust for the Prairie City 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the I'rairie Cil.v 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of ndi- 
ana in trust for the I'rairie City 
Bank 

The Treasurer of tlie State of Indi- 
ana in trust for *hc I'rairie Cil.', 
Baik 

Th^ Trea.'^urer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the I'rairie City 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust fjr the I'mirie (.'if. 
Bank ' 

The Ticasurer of tlie Stale of Indi 
ana ia trust for the I'rairie Cit;. 
Bank 

The Treasnier of the State of Indi 
ana in trast for the I'raiiie City 
Bink 

Tlie Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust lor the I'rairie City 
Bank 



§7,000 CO 
T,COO CO 
3.CU0 CO 
3,0CO CO 
5,C(I0 00 
7.500 00 
4.100 00 
2. ceo 00 

30,0C0 00 
7C0 CO 

SCO CO 

7 CO 00 

s,rMo 00 

10,000 CO 



5,CC0 00 



5,GC0 CO 



.'s,rco CO 

lO.SOO CO 
8,000 00 
4,CC0 CO 



4.0CO 00 
.'),CCO 00 
.'5,000 CO 
ry.OOO CO 
],:J00 CO 



L.WO CO 
3,500 CO 



5, coo CO 
5,CC0 00 
5,000 CO 
5.(iC0 CO 
5,CC0 CO 

r),c(,o 00 

5,000 CO 
5,000 CO 
5,000 CO 



April 1, 1857 
April 2, 1857 



April C, 1857 



April 13, 1?57 
Ai>ril 15, 1857 



April 10, 1857 

April 17, 1S57 
April 27, 1857 



May 2, 1857 



May 7, 1857. 



May?, 1857 



May 9, 1857. 



May 12, 1857 



hemauks. 



Inclusive cancelled. 



Issued in lieu of No. 2873 
for $65,000. 



41 



LIST of Ceiiijicalcs Indiana Jlcc per cciit. State Stock, issued 
from the olst day of October, 1850, to the 1st day of November, 
1857 — Continued. 



No. 

3!I9 

3120 

3121 

3122 

3lC3 

3124 

3125 

312G 

3127 

312S 

3129 

3130 

3131 

3132 

3133 

3134 



3135 

312G 
3137 
3138 
3139 
3140 
ra-Jl 
3142 
£K3 



3144 
3145 
314S 





TO WHOM ISSUED. 


Amount. 


Date. 


KEMAEKS. 




The Trerisurer of the State of In 
di;\ii;i in trust for the I'liiiiie City 
lianlc 


5,GC0 (0 

j 5,CC0 00 

i 

S,CtO CO 

5,CC0 CO 

5,CtO CO 

5,CC0 CO 

5,CC0 CO 

5,CC0 CO 

5,CC0 CO 

5,CC0 CO 

5,CC0 00 

5,C00 CO 

5, ceo CO 

.5,CC0 (.0 

5XC0 CO 

5,CC0 CO 

ll,,l,(U CO 

],L00 CO 

0,O(.'O GO 

510 CO 

5.(iL0 CO 

ll,l!UO (^0 

c:..-jOO CO 

4,y,(H) CO 

1,500 CO 
1(',CC0 CO 

8,.JC0 CO 
13,000 CO 


May 12, lf5T. 

May 13, 1857. 

Hay IF, l.=5T. 

May 10, 1857. 
May 20, 1857. 

May C2, 1857. 
May 23, 1857. 
May £3, 1857. 
May 29, 1857. 






The Tre.isuier of the State of In- 
diana iu ti-ust for the I'rairie City 
liaiik 






Tlie Treasurer of the State cf In- 
diana iu tius fjr the Prairie City 
Bank 






The Treisurei' of the Stite of In- 
diana in trust for the i'rairie City 
Bu;lc 






Tlie 'Ireusuier of the State of In- 
diana in trust for the Banic of Iii- 






Tlie Tre.isurer of tlie Stite of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of In 


Issued in lieu of No. i>f7 1 

for $t;o,i,to. 




Tlie Treisurer of the State of In 
liiaua in trust for the Bank of lu- 




Tlie Treasuier of the State of In- 
diana in trust for tlic Bank of In- 






The treasurer'' of tlie State of In- 
diana in trust for tlie Bank of lu- 






Tlie Treasurer of tlie St.ite of In- 
diana in trust fa- the Bank of In 






The Tivasurer of the State of In- 
di tna ill trust for the Bank of In- 
diana, .Miclii^an City 

The Treasurer of the S;ate of In- 
dima in trust for the Bank of I: 
diana, Michigan City 

Tlie Trt'asurjr of thf State of Ii 
diana in trust for the Bank of li 






The Tre isurer of the Stite of Ii 
di ma in trust for the Bank of li 






The Treasurer' of the State of Ii, 
di.ma in Irur^t fjr the Bank of Ii. 






The Tre.isurer" of the State of I:, 
diana in trust for tlie Bank of 1; 












The East Uiver Savings Institution. 
do dj do 

James Wirslow 

Jlei ,'s and Greenleaf 






Mei.'S and Greenlcaf 






The Aulitur of the Sfcitc of Ohi 
in Iru^t fur the Savings Bank ol 






The Au.liiur of the State of Ohi.) ii 
tru,-,t f.jr the Franklin Bank cl 






The Audita- of the State of Ohic 
in trust f r the Franklin Bank oi 
Porta 'e Co., Ohi ) 






Tlie Treasurer of ihe State of Indi- 
ana iu trust fjr tae Crescent City 
Bank 











42 



LIST of Cniificatcs of Indiana fii'c per cent. Sfnfr Stock, issued 
from the olst day of October, 185G, to the 1st day of November, 
1857 — Uontiinicd. 



No. 


TO WHOM ISSUED. 


Amount. 


Date. 


REMARKS. 


3147 


The Treasurer of the StUe of InrVi- 
ana ill trust for the Crescent City 










B:\iik 


SJ.OGO 00 


May 29, 1857. 




3148 


The Tre:\surer of the Stite of Indi- 






ana in trust for the Crescent Cicv 










Bank 


5,':00 00 






3149 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Blink 


5,000 00 






3150 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Bank 


5,0C0 00 






3151 


The Treasurer of th-s Sti'e of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Bank 


5,000 00 






3152 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crcscont City 
Bank 


5,0C0 00 






3153 


The Treasurer of tlie State of Indi- 
ana in trust far the Crescent City 
Bank 


5,000 00 






3154 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 








ana in trust for the Crescent City 










Bank 


5,0G0 00 






3155 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Bank 


5,roo CO 






315G 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Bank 


5,000 00 






3157 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Crescent City 
Bank 


4,000 CO 






3158 


Alei ,'3 and Greenlenf 


5,(l( 00 






315y 
31(50 


Lockwood Grummon 


],bt,0 00 

i(,r,oo 00 






Car] enter and Vermilye 


May 30, 1557. 




31G1 


Wiuslow, Lanier and Co 


2,01)0 (10 


June 1, 1857, 




3162 


Cari)cnter and Vermilye 


f'oo'j 00 
i,u(;o 00 




31ti3 


The East River Savin-s Bank 


June 2,18.57. 




31G4 


do 


22,000 00 






31G5 


do 


2,0!)0 00 






3IG6 


do 


2,0(10 00 






3107 


do 


1,000 00 






3158 


do 


1,(100 00 






31 GO 


do 


1,000 (0 






3170 


do 


1,000 00 






3171 


do 


],0t0 (10 






3172 


do 


1,(100 00 






3173 


do 


4,000 00 






3174 


do 


7(0 00 






3175 


do 


7,500 00 






3I7G 


do 


12,000 00 






3177 


do 


],(]()0 00 






3178 


Ro; ert Rinwi Idio and Co 


5,000 00 






3179 


8. A. Fietclier 


2 000 (10 






3180 


.I;iCol> Mule and Co 


12^100 to 






3)81 


The Treasurer of tlie St.te of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Central Bank, 










Iiidj iiiaiiilis 


l,0CO 00 


June 4, 1857. 




3162 


The Treai<iirer of tlie State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Central Rank, 
Indian aiiolis ••■■••• ••■-••••■•... 


1,000 00 






3183 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 








ana in trust for the Central Bank, 










JndianaTioliHt .•*••••..........,. 


1,(00 (.0 






3184 


The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 








ana ill trust t'jr the Central Uank, 










ludianapolis 


1,000 00 







43 

LIST of Cerl/Jieafps, Iinliava fire per cent. State Stock, from the 
Slst day of October, 185G, to the 1st day of Nocemhcr, 1857.— 
Continued. 




Treasurer of Stnte of Indinna, in 
trust for the Central Bank, Inciiau- 
apolis 

Treasurer of the State of IiiiHaiia, in 
trust for the Central Banlv, Indi- 
anapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Iniliana, in 
trust for the Central Lank. Inili- 
apolis 

Treasurer of tlie State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central Bank, Indi 
aiiapolis 

Treasurer of tlie State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central Banlc, Indi- 
anapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, 
in trust for the Kectucky Stock 
Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana. 
in trust for the Kentucky Stuck 
Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, 
in trust for the Kentucky Stock 
Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, 
in trust for the Kentucky- StocI; 
Bank 

Acjuilla Jones 

Henry Winkley 

The Auditor of the State of Ind- 
iana, in trust for the Bank of Elk- 
hart 

Treasurer of the State of Wisconsin, 
in trust for the Wisconsin Bank of 
Madison 

Treasurer of the State of AVisconsi 
in trust for the Wisconsin Bank of 
Madison 

Treasurer of State of Wisconsin, ii; 
trust for Wisconsin Bank of Mad- 
ison 

Treasurer of State of Wisconsin, ii 
trust for Wisconsin Bank of Mad- 
ison 

Carpenter & Vermilye 

Henry Winkley 

Simual Polleys , ... . 

Carpenter & Vermilj'i' 

Chapelle Marquis de Xumilhac 

E. W. Clark;, Dod-e & Co 

Carpenter & Vermilye 

Treasurer of the State ef Indian;: 
in trust for the Central Bank, ul 
Indianapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, 
in trust for the Central Bank, at 
Indianapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central Bank, 
Indianapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiiii 
in trust for the Central Bank, 
Imiianapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiai 
in trust for the Central Ban';, 
Indianapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, 
trust for the Central Bank, In 
anapolis 



$1,COO CO 
.5,000 CO 
5,C00 CO 

io,w;o CO 

5,0CO 00 

7,r.co 00 

5,100 CO 
0,CC0 00 



10,(00 ro 

S3,50C CO 
3,000 CO 



5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,C0O 00 
5,C00 00 



5,500 00 
n,(HiO 00 
3,000 CO 
T,.")OII 00 
7,0(10 00 

2,(;(i0 10 

4,000 (iO 
5,C0O 00 



l,C0O 00 
1,010 00 
1,0(0 CO 
1,!00 00 
l,!:ltu Oi) 
1,UOO 00 



June •!, 1S.57. 



Juno 11, 18:7. 



June 13, 1857. 
July ?, 1P57. 



July 0, 18.57. 
July 7, 1657. 

July 8, 1857. 

July 11, 1857. 

July 13, 1857. 



44 

LIST of Caiijjcaics, Indinva jive j^cr cent. State Stock, issued from 
the Slst dny of October, 1850, to the 1st droj of November, 1857. 
— Continued. 



TO WHOM ISSUKD. 



Treasurer of Stute of Indiana, ii 
ti-ust lor the Central bank, atludi 

anepolis 

Treasurer of Stutc of Indiana, in trust 
for the Central bank, at IiKlianap 
olis 

Treasurer of State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central liank, at In- 
dianapolis 

Treasurer of State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central bank, at In- 
dianapolis 

Treasurer of State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central bank, at In- 
dianapolis 

Treasurer of State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central bank, at In- 
dianapolis 

Treasurer of SUite of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central bank, at In- 
dianapolis 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central bank, at In- 
dianapolis 

Treasurer of State of Indiana, in 
trust for the Central bank, at In- 
dianapolis 

E. W. Clark, Dodge & Co 

J . & J . Lockie 

Carpenter &; Vermilye 

Cammanu tCo 

Kev. Lawrence Jno. Ilarrisan 

do do 

do do .... 
do do 

P. Morehouse 

H. T. Morgan & Co 

Cammann&. Co 

II. T. Mur-an &. Co 

AVinslow, Lanier & Co 

.Tohn B. Klin 

Harman Ahl 

The Auditor of the State of In li- 
ana, in trust for the hank of Elk- 
hart 

.T. R. Sliiclds 

C. U. I'ash, President 

E. W. Cbuk, Dod^'e & Co , 

Ward & Co 

E. W. Clark. Do l.i,"; & Co 

AVetmore & Cryder 

>'. A. Rrooks, tustce 

.lanies Shank 

Trcisurer of llie State of Indiana, 
in trust for the bank of Mount 
Vernon 

Treasurer of the State of ■\Visoonsln. 
in tru-t for the Merchints' and 
Mechanics' bank at Whitewater .. 

Field, Merritt & Co 

E. W. Clark, Dod.'O&Co 

Carjieiiter & Vermilye 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana, in trust for the Crescent City 
bank 

E. W. Clark, Dod-e & Co 

K. A. Jirook.s, trustee 

do do 



g!],iioo 00 

J,UUO 00 
1,000 CO 
],C00 00 

i,ao on 

1,C00 00 
],CO0 CG 
1,000 00 



1,000 CO 
2,00(1 00 

,500 00 
3,100 00 
3,.5C0 00 
5,000 CO 
1,0(10 00 
1,000 00 

500 00 

2,50:) 00 

2.5 (10 
1,500 00 
1,(J00 00 
1,000 00 
0,(100 00 
8,000 OU 



i!,r,{\0 00 

0,000 00 

]r>,{.oo 00 

1,000 00 

(;.ooo 00 

5,0(,0 00 

2,172 G7 

7,ooi) oy 

2,5 10 00 



2,000 (10 



ir),0!:o 0') 
i;!,ooo 01) 
5,oi;o ( 

10,01JO 00 



i:!,ooo 00 
1i;,(iO(i 00 

10.000 00 
5.000 00 



July 13, 1857 



.Tuly 18, 1857. 
July 20, 1857. 



July 21, 1857 
July 23, 1857 



July 24, 1857 
July 25, 1857 



July 31, 1857 

Aug. 1, 1857. 

Aug. 3,1357. 

Au-.6,I857. 
An-. 7, 1857. 
Au-. H, 1857 

Aug. 15, 1857 
Au-. 17, 1857 



Aus'. 10, 1857 



REMARKS. 



45 



LIST of Certificates of Indiana five per cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Slst day of October, 185G, to the 1st day of November^ 
1857 — Continued. 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



The Auditor of the Stnte of Indiana 
in trust for the Southern Bank of 
Indiana, at Terre Haute 

The Auditor of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Soutliern Eanl; of 
Indiana, at Tene Haute 

Lockwoo 1 &Co 

E. Whitehouse, Sou & Morrison... . 

Charles E. Blunt 

H.T. Morgan &. Co 

Nassau Bank 

Weeks & Co 

Atwond &; Co 

do 

AVir.slow, Lanier & Co 

John Reid 

II. T. Morgan & Co 

S. A. Fletcher 

Mrs. Charlotte.!. Bullus 

■\Vard& Co 

Nassau Bank 

Atwood & Co 

James Carter 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Southern Bank 
of Indiana, at Terre Haute 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Southern Bank 
of Indiana, at Terre Haute 

J. M. Lord 

S. A. Fletcher 

H.A.Johnson& Co 

Ilebfcca B. Tunis 

John M. Jyrd 

0. Ballard, jr.. Cashier 

Charles Bird, Baltimore 

John H. Engelberts 

John Warren and Son 

Ward & Co 

The Beekman Fire Insurance Co. . . 

0. Bonen 

John Warren and Son 

G. A. Rollins 

II. Meigs, jr., and Smith 

John Warren and Son 

0. Ballard, jr.. Cashier 

E. AV. Clark. Dod^'e & Co 

N. R. Cobb& Co 



II. L. Jacques 

Ballard, jr.. Cashier... 
II. Meigs, jr., and Smith 

J. and J . Lockie 

David Fleming 

0. Ballard, jr.. Cashier... 
E. Dumont. Presider.t . . . 
do 



E . Dumont, President ■ 

do 

Carpenter and Vermilye 

E . Dumont, Presiiient 

The Auditor of the State of Indiana' 
in trust for the Indiana St'k Bank,' 
at Laporte I 

The Auditor of the State of Indiana' 
in trust for the Indiana St k Bank,' 
at Laporte 1 



S.},CCO CO 



3, COO CO 
E,i;i)U LO 
],(,00 LO 
],0 Uo 
l.j,W.O CO 
28,0(0 CO 
1(I,CU0 CO 
14,0(.0 00 
]4,C(1() CO 
CCIlO ((I 
e,.j.:0 CO 
9.JC0 CO 

:i,i CO 01) 

],CO(l 00 
.5,1 00 00 

;h,oco CO 
n,5co CO 

3,CC0 CO 



4,C00 00 



?,CCO CO 
28,0! CO 
5,000 (.0 
4,0C0 CO 
1,CC0 CO 
5,CC0 00 
4,0CO 10 
3.0110 00 
SCO CO 
2,5C0 CO 
2,0(0 CO 
0,400 CO 
3, ICO CO 
],C00 CO 
],C00 CO 
4,0C() CO 
3,CL0 CO 
5,0{,0 CO 
4, ceo (0 
lO.COO 00 

4,000 CO 
5,000 CO 
9,( CO to 
8,5(.0 I.G 
4,(00 CO 

e.oi.o CO 

3,(0 1 (ill 
3,C0i> CO 

ri,ccn 04) 

4,(.C0 00 

e,( 00 CO 

2,0C0 00 




August 19, 1857. 



August CO, 18.iT. 
August 22, 1857. 

August 25, 1857. 

August 27, 18.57. 
August 26, 18,57. 
August 27, 1857. 



August 28, 1S57 
August 29, 1857 

August 31, 1857 

Sept. 1, 1857. 

Sept. 2, 1857. 
Sept. 3, 1857. 



2,rx 00 



2,0CO CO 



Sept. 4, 1857. 

Sept. 7, 1857. 
Sept. 8, 1857. 



Sept. 10, 1857 



REMARKS. 



Canceled. 



46 



LIST of Certificates of Indiana five per cent. State Stocks, issued 
from the olst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of November^ 
1857— Contiiiuccl. 



BY WHOM ISSUED. 



The Auilitor of Shte of Indiana in 

ti-ust for the Indiana Stock Bank. 

at Lap.rte §2,000 00 

The Auditor of SUUe of Indiana in 

ti-ust fji' the Indiana Stock Bank. 

at Lii'ovte 2,000 00 

The Auditor of State of Indiana in 

trust fjr the Indiana Stack Bank, 

at Liiporte 2,C00 CO 

The Auditor of State of Indiana in 

trust fjr the Indiana Stock Bank. 

at Lipnrte 1,000 00 

The Auditor of State of Indiana in 

trust for the Indiana Stock Bank, 

atLaporte 1,000 00 

The Auiitor of State of Indiana in 

trust for the Indiana Stock Bank, 

atLaporte 1,000 00 

The Au lit.)r of State > f Indiana in 

trust for the Indiana Stock Bank, 

atLaporte 1,000 CO 

Tlie Auiitor of State of Indiana in 

trust for the Indiana Stock Bank, 

at Laporte 1,000 00 

E.Dumont, Presiient 1,0(10 (iO 

do 5,100 00 

John Lindsley 2,C00 00 

The Tre;isurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Fai'niers' Bank 

of Westfield 12,0r0 00 

■\Vm. II. Neilson 1,G"2 67 

Nuno Alexander de Carvalho 500 00 

The Lisan Branch of the State Bank 

of Oliio 3,C0O 00 

The Excnange Bank, at Circleville, 

Ohio 14,000 00 

E. Dumont, President 3,100 00 

Wiiislow, Lanier t Co 5j2 07 

Ph.lo Morehouse 4,000 00 

E.Dumont, President 5,000 00 

do 5,000 00 

do 5,000 00 

do 5,000(10 

do 3,0(10 00 

do 3,000 GO 

do 3,(JfcO 00 

do 2,000 00 

do 2,000 00 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana iii trust for the Southern Bank 

of Indiana .'. 5,000 CO 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust f jr the Southern Bank 

of Itjdiana 5,000 00 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in tru.sl for the Southern Bank 

of Indiana 4,C00 00 

The Trcisnrerof the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Canal Bunk, 

Evangville 1,000 00 

The Treasurer of the Stito of Indi- 
ana, in trust for the Canal Bank, 

Kvansville 1,000 00 

The Treasurer of the State rif Indl- 
an.a in trust for the Canal Bank, 
Evansvillc 1,COO 00 

i J ■ 



Amount. 




Sept. 16, 1857. 



Sept. 11, 1657. 

Sept. 14, 1857. 
Sept. 15, 1857. 
Sept. 16, 1857, 



REMARKS. 



Canceled. 



47 

LIST of Certificates of Indiana fine j^cr cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of November^ 
1857. — ContinuGd. 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



The Treasurer of the State of Ind 
ana in trust for the Canal Bank at 

Kvansville 

The Tie.isurer of the State of Iiiiii- 
anain trust for the Canal Bank at 

EvansviUe 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi-" 
ana in trust for tlie Canal Bank at 

Kvansvillf 

F. & A. Ilusc'h in trust for Von Wyss 

E. Dumont, Pres't 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



E . Dumont, Pres't 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Farmers' Bank 

of Westfi.dd 

E . Dumont, Pres't 

do 

do 

do 




0. Bowen 

S. A.Fletcher :. 

li. T. Prinsep, R. Hook. II. BuUar 
and Wm. E. Hilliard 

11. T Prinsep, R. Hook, II. Bullar 
and Wm. E. Hilliard 

Tlie Auditor of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Cambridge Citi- 
bank 

The Auditor of the State of Indiana' 
in trust for tlie Cam'orid'^e City 
Bank " 

The Auditor of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Camliridge City 
Bank 

Tqe Auditor of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Cambridge City 
Bank 

The Auditor of the State of Indiiina 
in trust for the Cambridire City 
Bank ". '. 

Tlie Auditor of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Cambridge City 
Bank 

.lohn SI. Lord 

Thomas Coterill, Esq., a citizen of 
the United States, at present 
residing at Birmingham in Eng- 
land 

Kent, Louber &Co : 

The Auditor of the Stat> of Ohio in 
trust for the Franklin Bank, Por-! 
tage County, Ohio 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio in 
trust fir the Franklin Bank, Por- 
tage County, Ohio 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio in 
trust for the Franklin Bank, Por- 
tage County, Ohio 

The Auilitor of the State of Ohio in 
trust for the Franklin Bank, Por-, 
tage County, Ohio 



1,G00 00 



1,000 00 



1,000 00 
e,.illD CO 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 t.O 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 CO 

2,000 CO 



8,000 00 

3.572 07 

10,000 00 

10,100 CO 

10,000 00 

0,400 00 
5,000 00 

7,000 00 

7,000 00 



1,100 00 
1,0(!0 00 
1,OCO CO 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



1,000 00 
2,000 00 



4,500 00 
G,000 00 



1,000 CO 
1,000 00 
1,000 CO 

1,000 00 



Sept. IG, 1857, 



Sept. 17, 1856, 



Sept. C'l, ]ra7. 
Sept. 22, 1857. 



Sept. 23, 1S57. 
Sept. 28, 1857. 



Oct. 1,1837. 



Oct. 3, 1857. 



Oct. .'', 1857. 



REMARKS. 



Canceled. 



48 

LIST of Ccrfifcntcs of Indiana frc pn^ cent. State Stod; issued 
from the olst dny of 0-"fohc}\ 18r->('), to the 1st day of November^ 
1857.— Contiiiiuvl. 




3381 

3383 
3384 



338J 

3386 

3337 

3388 

3389 

3391) 

3391 

3392 

3^^ 

3394 

3393 

3390 

3397 

3393 

3399 

34 IX) 

3401 

3402 

3^103 

3404 

3405 



John M. Loivl 

do 

P llaul.v, Ksi 

Tlie Autlitor of the Stiite of Ohio 
in trust fjr the St;ir..e County 

Bulk 

The Tre:isui-ei- of the Stiite of Imli 
ana in trust for the C;imbri,Ig\ 

Citv Hank 

Treisurer of the St;ite of Inilima 
in trust for the Camtriilv;e Citv 

Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Iniliina 
in trust for the Cimlu'iJge Ciiy 

Bank 

Treasurer of the Stite of Indiana 
in trust for the Cambridge City 

B.mk 

Treasurer of the State of In:liana 
in trust for the Cambridge Ciiy 

Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Camhrid^'e City 

Bank '. 

Troa-urer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Cam'iridi^e City 

Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Indiinii 
in trust for the Cambridge City 

Bank '. 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Cambridge City 

Bank 

Treasnrer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Cambridge City 

Bank 

Treisurer of the State of Indian 
in trust for the Cambridge City 

Bank 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Camliri.ige City 

Bank 

Treasurer of ttu State of Indiana 
ill trust for tlie Camliridge City 

Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Go 

shen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Go 

shen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Go- 
shen 

The Treasnrer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Go 

shen 

The Tre.vsurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Go- 
shen 

Tlic Treasurer of tiie Stale of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Jiank of Go- 
shen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi. 
ana in trust for tlie Itank of Oo- 

slien 

The Treasurer of the St:ite of Indi.j 
ana In trust for tlie Bank of Go- 
shen I 



e,cno 00 
2,()(;u 01) 

3,1JU0 00 

e,4oo 00 

5,0C0 CO 
5,000 00 
5.0C0 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,Li00 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

SCO 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



Oct. 5, 18"7 
Oct. G. \K>~, 
Oct. 8, IS.'iT 



REMARKS. 



49 

LIST of Certificates of Ind'uma Fioc ])er cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Sl.sY ((ay of October, 185G, to the 1st day of Aorcmberf 
1857. — Co uti lined. t 



TO WJIOM ISSUED. 



T!i.' Trca^uroi- of tlic Sl\if of In 
<li;iii-i ill triiit for th-j Uiink u 
CaxW.ii- 

The 'Jrji^ni-LT of Ihy St;t'j of In- 
diana in trust fur 'jiu li.iiik of 
(i,).i!i,-,i 

Tlie Troisurc-r of the Stat.' of Iii- 
di Hia. ia trust for tlie iJ.iulc o| 
G.shen 

The Trjisurer of t'u St itj of In 
iliaiia ill ti-u-t fur tlie Bank o 
(iiislien 

T:i« Trc-asurc-r of the Stitj of In 
iliiiiii iii trust fiir tJie Jiank of 
U.sh;n 

Tile Truisurer of the State of In- 
diana in trust for tlie Uaiil; of 
tioshen 

Tl'.c Tri-asurer of tlie State of In 
iliuia in trust for tlie Dank of 
(iosaen 

Tiie Treisurer of the Stati if In- 
ili.uia in trust for tlie IJauk of 
(joslK.'n 

Tlie Treasurer of tlie State of. In- 
ili ma iu trust for the Bank of 
Co^hen 

Tile Treasurer of t'le S.'ate of In- 
ili.uia ia trust for the P.auk of 
(fisaeii 

Tlie Treasurer of the Stat.: of In- 
<U:ina ia trust fjr the Dank ui 
G ishen 

Tiie Treasurer of the State of In 
diana in ti'ust for the Dank oi 
(iasheu 

The Treasurer of the State i;f In- 
dir.ni in trust for the Dank i.t 
Goshen 

Tlie Tre,isu:-er of the .State of Indiana 
in trust fir the Tipiiecanoe D.iuk 
Lo;?ans[jort 

Thei're isurerof tfn Stitv of Indiana 
in trust for the Tipi.eeauoe Dank, 
Lo^jmsjuirt 

The Treasurerof the State of Indiana 
in trust fir the Tiiipec.inoe Dank, 
Lo'Tansjiort 

TluTreasU'.-er of the St.teof In liana] 
in trust fir the Tiiipeeaiioo Dank, 
I/O ;ai. sport 

Tile Treasurer of the State of [n liana 
ill trust for the Tippecamjc Dank, 
1/ <[f insport 

The Tre isurerof the State of Indiana' 
in trust fir the Tippecanoe Dank, 
Log uispi r. 

The 'ire.isurer of the St iteoT Iniliana 
ia trust for the Tippecanoe tiank, 
IiOi;ansiiort 

TheTreasurer of theSlaleof In liana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Dank,] 
Lo,'ansport •. 

The tre.iMUerof the Stateof In'i in.al 
ii trust for the Tijipecanuo Dank, I 
I.o^ansport 

The Tre:isurer of the State "f Indiana 
ia trust, for thj Tiiniee. rue Dan.v,' 
Lojausjiart 

1 D. J.— 4. 



•SI, too CO 

I, ceo CO 
1,C00 CO 
1,CC0 CO 
I, ceo CO 

],cco to 
i,o:o CO 

il.CCO CO 
l.CCO CO 
l.COO CO 
1,0C0 CO 
1,000 CO 
l.COO CO 
1,000 00 
1,CC0 00, 

i,cco CO 

1,OCO 00 
1,000 00 

i,coo CO 

1,000 00 
1,0C0 00 
],0C0 CO , 
1,000 00 



Oct. 8, ItjT. 



IlEMAPwSS. 



tifl 



'M 



50 

LIST of Certificates of Indiana Five j^cr cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of November, 
1857.— Continued. 



Ho. 



3429 
3430 
1431 
S432 
3433 
3434 



^35 
3436 
3437 
3438 
3439 
3440 
3441 



3445 
3443 
3444 
3445 



344« 
3447 
3448 
^39 
34Se 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Bank, 
Lojansport 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tipjiecanoe Bank 
Lngans]iort ■ 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Bank, 
Losransport 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Bank, 
Lojansport 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Bank, 
Logansport 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe Bank, 
Logansport 

John M. Lord 

W. &. J. O'Brien 

John M. Lord 

Ward & Co 

W. B. Gierke 

AVm. G. Temple 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Indiana Farmers 
Bank.... 

Carpenter & Vermilye 

W. B. Gierke 

John Sneden 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Salem Bank of 
Goshen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Salem Bank of 
Goshen • 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Salem Bank of 
Goshen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Salem Bank of 
Goshen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Salem Bank of 
Goshen 

W. B. Gierke 



Jl.OOO 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 CO 
1,000 00 



500 CO 

4,0(i0 CO 
5,500 00 
4,000 CO 
1,0(X) <'0 
500 00 
1 000 00 



0,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
2,000 CO 



1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



1,000 00 
3,600 00 



Oct. 8. 1857 



Oct. 10, 1857. 
Oct. 12, 1857. 

Oct. 17, 1857. 



Oct. 17, 1857. 
Oct. 28, 1587. 



Oct. 31, 1857. 



REMARKS. 



61 



LIST of Certificates, Indiana 2| per cent. State Stocky issued from 
the 3l5i day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of November^ 
1857. 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



John M. Lord 



Ilarilman Earlc 

W. II. Neilsoii 

John M. Lord 

Wm. II. Neilaon 

E. W. Clark, Dodge & Co - 

The Indiana bank, Madison. ... 

AVm . Smith , Dmggist 

A.J. Glossbrenner , 

Palmer, McKillop, Dent & Co. . . 

Wm. II. Ncilson 

William &. John O'Brien , 

do do do 

Chas. Gould 

J. R. Shields , 

John H. Englel erts 

W. II. Neilson , 

do 

Elisha Kockwood , 

E- W. Clark, Dodge &. Co 

E . Ludlow, cashier 

AVilliam &. John O'Biien 

W.H. Neilson 

William & John O'Brien 

E . II . Ilerrick 

C . Durand ... 

W. H. Neilson 

Delaney, Iselin,& Clark 

Wm. H. Neilson 

A . Vandeqiool 

W. C. DePauw 

Duncan, Sherman &Co 

Wm. II. Neilson 

do 

B. R. Winthrop, in trust for the 
children of Hiram C. and Mary E 
Beach 

E . Ludlow, cashier 

The Institution for savings of Mer- 
chants' clerks 

James X. McLanahan 

Dykes. Alstyne&Co 

Wm. H. Neilson 

Dykes, Alstyne & Co 

E . II. Herrick 

Winslow, Lanier & Co 

Alanson L. Baldwin 

do do 

do do 

The Auditor of the State of Indi- 
ana, for the use of Champaign co. 
bank 

Alanson L. Baldwin 

S. A. Fletcher 

Dykirj, Alit yne & Co 

W. H. Neilson 

Adams & Buckingham 

Meigs tt. Greenleaf 





$900 00 Nov. 1, 1856. 



Nov. 3, 1856. 
Dec. 3, 1856. 
Dec. 5, 1856. 
Dec. 6, 1856. 

Dec. 8, 1856. 



Dec. 12, 1855. 
Dec. 13, 1856. 



Dec. 23, 18.53. 
Jan. 9, 1857. 



Jan. 10, 185 . 

Jan. 12, 1857. 

Jan. 14, 1857. 

Jan. 16, 1857. 

Jan. 21, 1857. 
Jan. 22, 1857. 

Jan. 23, 1857. 

1,000 00 
23,000 00 Jan. 24, 1857. 

27,000 00 

3,(00 00 
33,000 00 

7,578 00 
28 000 00 

5,000 00 
21,793 GO 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

1,793 00 



Jan. 26, 1857. 

Jan. 31. 1857. 
Feb. 2, 1857. 



Feb. 7, 1857. 
Feb. 10 1857. 



REMAKKS. 



Canceled. 

For bond surreadered. 



For bond surrendoted . 



52 



LIST of CoHficatcs of Indiana 21 r^^r cent. SMc Stock, issued 
■ from t'tc 31>/ day of October, 185G, to the 1st day of November, 
I 1S57. — Ci)iiliiuKHl. 



No. 



2^f3 

Sei'.') 
2806 

28117 
2803 



SS09 
9810 
SBll 

sei2 

2813 
S814 
ei5 
«1C 
8817 
9613 
8619 

flB2n 

«E1 

SP22 

88-23 

8834 

8825 

aB2o 

8827 

»K8 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



.T.M. tiOH 

Wm. II. Neils 111 

Wir.l, C:iini>l'eU, &Co 

W. IJ. N.ilsan 

do 

Tieisurer of tlie State of Iivliiii'. 
in trvist fjr the Kentuc'iy Stoc'.i 

1 ank 

Ti-j;isuier of tliu Stite of Indiana, 
in tnut f Ji- the Lagi-ani^e banlc, i-t 

Limn 

Tre isurer of tlic State of Indiana 
in trust for the Indiana bank, at 

M:< lisan 

Treisurer of the State of Indi ma. 
in trust for the C.im". rilge City 

1 ank 

Treasurer of tlie Stito of In'.nna 
in Irust for the Exchange bank, at 

Greene 'stle 

Tre isurer of tlie State of Indian 
ill trust for t'le Exchange 1 ank, at 

Greene istle 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
iu trust f.ir tlie Exchange bank, at 

Greeneastle 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana. 
in trust fur the Exchange ba.ik, at 

Greencastle 

Trc;vsurer of the State of Indiana. 
iu trust for the Exchange bank, ai 

Greeucastle 

Treasurer of the State of Iniiiana. 
in trust for the Exchange bank, at 

(ii-een-^'.stle 

Tr;vsurer of the Stvt3 of In liana, 
in tru^t f.ir the Excliange bank, at 

Grcinc istle 

Trasurer of the Stite of Indi ma. 
ill trust fir the Exchange bank, ai 

Greciic.istle 

Tre uurcr of the State of Indi ma. 
in trust for thj Exchange bank, al 

(ireencastle 

Tre usiu-lT of the State of Indiana, 
in trust f n- the Exchange l)ank, at 

(ireenci'.st'e ■ 

Tieisurer of the State of Indiana, 
ill tru-t f.ir the Exchange bank, at 

(ireencastle 

Tr^i'-surjr of the Stvt; of Indiana, 
ill t u-;t for the Exchange bank, at 

(irce'i'; istle 

Tri.-isura- of the State oflndiina, 
in trust for the Exchange banl. 

(ireencastle 

Tf auirer of the State of Indiana. 
In trust for the Exchange bank, at 

(ireencastle 

Treasurer of the State of Indi;ina, 
ill truHtforthe Excliingc bank, at 

(!r;encastle 

Tre^wurer of the Slite of Inli.vna 
in tru:!t fir the Plxclian^o l)aiik,a 

Gre-iie i.stle 

Treasurer of the Stit-; of Inliini, 
ill trust for the Exchan^'e bank, at 
Oro'jncaiitle 



$i^rn 00 
n^so oil 
:?,-8ii o;) 
].«oo u\ 
3,.eb 10 



5,000 CO 

£e,050 00 

40,077 5;l 

3G,0CO 00 

l.OCO 00 

1,CC0 CO 

J, coo CO 

],CO0 CO 
1,000 00 
1,000 CO 
1,000 CO 
1,000 CO 
1,G00 00 
1,000 CO 
1,0'JO 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 CO 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,0!)0 00 



re'i. 1?, if=.". 

I\'h. Ki, l.^'>~. 
Fc). C3, 18.')7. 

Fei. CG, ISjT 
Feb. 2?, 1S57 



RIi:M.\R:CS. 



JIarch 4, 1357 



63 

LIST of Ccrtif cafes of ImHaiui 21 per cent. State Stool; issued 
from the olst day of October^ ISijC), to the 1st dai/ of Kurcmtjcr^ 
1857. — Continued. 



TO ■\VIIOM ISSUED. 



Tlie Ti-ea.=ui-ei- of tlie St^te of IntVi- 
:in;i id trust f r tlie K.\ch:in^o Bank 
iit (Ji(.oiic;i-tle 

The Tre.isui-er of llie St;it'^ of Iivliac 
ill trust fur the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

Tl)e Treasui-eruf t!ie State of In.Iian: 
in trust fir the Exchange B ink al 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Imliann 
in trust for tii'.' Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

T:ie Tre usurer of the St.it j of In 
(liana in tiust fur the Bank o1 
Goshen 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tii)iiecanoe Bank. 
Lo^'ansport 

The Treasurer of the Sute of Iniiiaiiii 
in trust for the Farmers Bank al 
AVestliel I 

W. 11. Neilson 

Th'j Iiistitutim fir the Savings of 
Jlerchanls Clerks 

AVm. Ki-llv 

■»■. II. Neilson 

Gregory T. Be>lell in trust for Mrs 
l>: Belell 

Vr. 11. Neilson 

do 

do 

The Au:litor of the State of Indi ma 
in trust for the State De jt Sinking: 
Fun I 

Wirisl.iiv, Linier & Co 

E. W. Clark, Dodge & Co 

W. II. Neiison 

Dykes, .\lstyne & Co 

James Winslow 

do. 

do. 

rr..i;:i A. i;.-.o:.s, cuole^ 



The Treasurer of the Stnte of Indi 
ana in trust for the Cam) ridge City 
Bank 

The Treisurer of the State of Indi- 
anaia tru.-t for t!id Caml.rid^e Ci;y 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Cam: ridge City 
Bank 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Camljri lire City 
Bank "; 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Cam^jridge CiLv 
Bank ". 



Amount. 


Date. 


REMARKS. 


],0C0 CO 


JIarch30, l£.-.7. 






],C03 CO 








1,C00 CO 








05,753 CO 








52,5C2 50 








40,000 CO 








31,9:0 .50 
],0(,0 00 


Arril 7, lf.57. 






8,C00 CO 

1,^011 (,0 

bi.5 00 


April 8, 1857. 
Ainil 28, lt57. 






4,0C0 00 
0i5 (;0 
290 CO 

1,000 00 


April 30, 1857. 






13..576 00 
]5,1.S7 50 
1(J,C00 00 
G"5 00 
],(;00 CO 
5,0(v0 00 
5,(1(10 00 
5,137 .50 

l.,0„0 Ciy 


May 7, 1857. 

May 8. 1857. 


Canceled. 
Canceled. 




5, COO 00 


May n, 1857. 






5,(:C0 CO 








5,C00 CO 








5,C0O CO 








],r.34 00 









64 

LIST of Certificates of Ivdiaria 2^ per cent. State Stock, issued 
from the Slst day of October j 1856, to the 1st day of November, 
1857.— Continued. 




The Tre-isurerof the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
G reencastle 

The Treasurer of the Stite of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indian 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencjistle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for ttie Exchange Bank at 
Oreenc;istle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust fur the Exchange Bank of 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bjink at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Exchange Bank at 
Greencastle 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
aua in tru,t for the Bank of Gus 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

TheTreasnrcr of the State of Indi 
ana in tiOit for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi 
ana intrust for the Bank of Gos- 
l)0rt 

The Treasurer of t!ie Sliteoflndl 
ana in trust for the Bank of Uos 
port.. 



Amount. 




S5,0C.O 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 CO 
5,C00 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,758 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 CO 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



May 12, 1857 



May 16,1857. 



REMARKa. 



Issued in lieu of No. 2833 

for $05,758. 



55 

LIST of Certificates of Indiana 21 per cent. State Stock, issued 
from the '61st day of October, 185G, to the 1st day of Nooember, 
18.57. — Continued. 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 




The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust far the Bank of Cos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Banlc of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust fur the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Banli of Gos- 
port 

Tke Treasurer of tlie State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of tlie State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
))ort 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the Stite of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for tlie Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

Tlie Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
I)ort 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

Vt. II.,Neil3on 

The Auditor of the State of Ohio for 
the use of the t'hampaign County 
Bank 

Ths Auditor of the SUite of Ohio for 
the use of the Champaign County 
Bank 



. §1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
5,000 CO 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
3,000 00 
5,000 00 



4,687 50 
5,000 00 



10,000 CO 
10,000 CO 



May 16, 185 ' 



May 22, 1857. 
May 03, 1857. 



56 

LIST of Certificates of India ria 2 J pei- cent. State. Stock, issued 
from the Slst (fay of October, 185G, to th^. 1st day cf Nofcmhcr, 
1857. — Continued. , 



30C8 

30CD 
3011 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



An litor of the St:ite of Ohio in tru?t 
1' r the Chumpiiiijn County Bank, 
Ohio 

M.F. ILizen 

Wei.'-; & Ureeiile if 

Thi! TiViisurei- of tlie State of Ii.d 
ana in trust for the 15iinl< of O.iS- 
lot 

Meigs & (i!Cenle;if 

The Treasurer of the State of Ini'.i- 
aii.a in trust for tlie lianlc of ' i l^ 
Jiort 

The Treasurer of tlie State of Intii 
I'.ra in trust fjr t!ie Dan'.; of Uos 
lort 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
roit 

Tlie Treasurtr of tlie State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Cos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
.ana in trust for the Bank of Uos- 
])ort 

The Tr'asurer of the State of Indi 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
I'ort 

Tlie Treasurer of the 5tate cf Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasurer of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos- 
port 

The Treasuier of the State of Indi- 
ana in trust for the Bank of (ios 
port 

TheTreasnrcr of llie State of Indi- 
ana in li ust for the Bank of Gos 

r">t 

The Treasurer of the State of Ii di 
ana in trust for the Bank of Gos 
port , 

T!i" Tr"i-nr<^" of t'i'> St-\f'' of T:;i'i 
una in trust for the Bank at Gos- 
]iort 

James G. Kini & Sons 

The Aulitor of t!ie State of Indian:: 
in trust f.;r *ie liank of the Capi- 
tol 

Th- Aiidit-)rof the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Bank of the Capi 
tol 

The Auditor of tlie State of Indi ina 
in trust for the Bank of the Capi- 
t'.I 

The Auditor of the St'tc of Indiana 
in trust for the Bank of the Cajii 
tol 

Tlie Auditor of the State of Indian; 
in trust for tlie Bank of the Cajd- 
tol 

Simncl l'ol|.->s 

S<;)iudiarlt t GeMiar.l 

T:ie Rev. I, iwn-iin' .(,)li!i II inisor 

v.. \\. Clark, lJ"U'e & Co 

Wetmore & Crydcr 

F. A. Brook , trustee 

i; . \V . Clark. Di)<l„'e & Co 

Jainei ^h^nk 



Date. 



§10 ceo CO 
]5.(iS7 ."SO 
5,100 CU 



P.COO 00 

■Jjisr jo 



l.CCO (.0 
1,CC0 CO 
1,CC0 CO 
1,000 00 
1,CC0 00 
1,000 tiO 
1,000 00 
1,CC0 00 
1,000 CO 
1,CC0 00 
1,000 00 



1,087 50 
],(H0 00 



1,000 CO 
1,000 00 
],C00 00 
1,000 CO 



1,000 CO 
S.',043 00 
3iii) (,0 
':',5I'J 50 
l.O'O 00 

i,ii'(i :,:> 
l,(Hi) (.11 
i,M;<\ ',; 

'/•.5 to 



May r3. 1P5T. 
MayOT, 1F5T. 
May 3, , Ir^T. 



June 11, 1F57. 



June Vi, 1CS7 



REMAIUCS. 



July e,if 



July 7, 1F57. 
July 15. lf-57. 
July 21', 1K57. 
July 2}^, l^r. 
Au,'. G, 1^>7. 
All-. 7, lK-)7. 
Au^'. 1-!, Ihj7. 



57 

LIS^T of Cciiific'tc.^ of Iii<^!aiia2.}, r.cr cent. State Stodr, issued 
from the olst day of Odcljcr, 185G, to the 1st day of A\)Cemlc}\ 
1857. — Continued. 



3t29 



S040 
VAAl 
3.42 

•Mia 

3044 

st!4r, 

3;)4»J 
3'. 47 
3048 
3149 



3050 



SC53 
3C54 
3055 
3()5G 
3C57 
3058 
3C59 
"CCO 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



Till' Trc;\sari-i- of tlie State of Imli-; 
una ii. uu:-t for tlie Bank of Gu- 
slion 



!•'. A. Brooks, trustee 

Kctchuiu & \Villiam3 

.T. limmloii & Son 

CariJfiiter & Voniiil.ye. . .. 

.lohii Searing 

E. \V. Clark, Doilje & Co. 



J . IJrandon & Son 

Susan C. Williams 

Henry T. I'rinsep. Roliert Honk, 
lie; vv IJullar ai.,nVill;:iini:. Ilil- 
li r,l 

Tliomas Coteiill, Esq., a citizen 
of the Unite. I States, at jjresent 
resi<niig at Biriiiin2;ham in Ei 
land ; 

Tre tsurer of the State of Irdiana 
in trust for the Tii.pecanoe Hank, 
Li'iai'Siiort 

Trea>urer of the State of Imlian.a 
in trust for the liiiiiecanoe Bank, 
Lo,jans])ort 

Treasurer of tlie State of Imli ma 
in trust for the Tipjiecanoe Bank, 
Lo,:;ai' ."'ort 

TreLsurtr of the State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tipi ccanoe Bank^ 
Loj:ansi)ort | 

Treasurer of the State of In<lianaj 
in trust far the Tippecam e Bank,| 
L()=;ansport I 

Tre-.surer of the State of Inditira 
in tru.^t for the Tijipecanoe Bank 
Logansport 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
in trust for tlie Tii'pecanoe Bank 
L.i..'ansp.a-t 

Trea.<urer of the State of Indiana 
in trust fia' the Tipjiecanoe Bank, 

Treasurer of tlie State of Indiana 
in trust for the Tippecanoe I'iink, 
I>o,'insi>crt 

Treasurer of the State of Indiana 
iu trust for thd Tippecanoe Bank, 
Loiausport 



/.mount. 


Date. 


S'.r,!)T 5(i 

5.ji;(; :>:> 

J .( ( l(J 

J.((iO (0 
l\t.LO ( U 


Aug. 15, 1P5' 
Au-. 1<), 185" 
Sept. i.', 185' 

?ei)t. 3, 1F5 
Sept. 4, lt'5' 


r.(co (() 

C.tlHI (-(1 


?ept. 5, If5' 


4,':9:; CO 


Sept. iC, U5' 


],.'iC7 50 


Oct 


5,CC0 CU 


Oct. e. :£5T 


5,CC0 CO 




5,c(;o 00 




5,C( CO 




5,CC0 CO 




5, ceo CO 




5.CC0 CO 




5,''cn c: . 




5,CC0 (C 




i.rco CO 





REMAKKS. 



58 



LIST of Ccrtijieatcs of Wabash and Eric Preferred Canal Stocky 
issued from the olst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. 



No. 



1787 
17f8 
1789 
1790 

1791 
1792 
1793 
1794 
1795 
J796 
1797 
1798 
1799 
1600 
1801 
•1802 
1803 
1804 
1805 
180C 
1807 

1808 
18C9 
1810 
1811 



1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 



TO "tVIIOM ISSUED, 



Elizaheth B. Underhill 

Jacob Little & Co 

•Tiicob Little 

Jno. Ilendersm, Jno. McEwen, and 

John Smith, Truatees 

Duncan, Sherman &Co 

Pati-ick Strahan 

Wm. D. Scott 

.Tames Miller 

T. W. Millsr, Trustee for A.B.Miller, 
do do W.C.Miller, 

T.W.Miller 

Schuchiu-dt and Gebhardt 

The Rev. Lawrence Jno. Harrison. . 
do 
do 
do 

James Shunk 

Charles Weill), Cashier 

AVii.slow, Lanier & Co 

II. T. Prinsep, K. Hook, Henry Bul- 

lar, and Wm. E. Hilliard 

do 

S. A. Fletcher 

E . D. Mor :;an 

Thos. Cotterill, Esr|., a citizen of the 
United Stiites, at present residing 
at Birmingham, in England 

P. C. Calhoun, President 

do 
do 



Amount. 


Date. 


REMARKS. 


S18,8r0 00 


Jan'y 12. 1857. 




37,7(i0 (10 






37,700 OU 


Jan'y 21, 18,57. 




18,500 CO 


June 0, 1F57. 




10,500 00 


June 12, 1857. 




5,000 1,0 


July G, U57. 




5,01 :0 CO 




Canceled. 


375 00 


July 8, 1857. 




375 00 






375 00 






375 CO 






1,C(0 (,0 


July 15, 1857. 




5 too (!0 


July 20, 1857. 




1,000 CO 






1,010 00 






500 CO 






2,500 00 


Aug. 31, 1857. 




10,(0(1 CO 


Sept. 11, 18.57 




],(.00 CO 


Sept. £8, 1857. 




7,000 00 






7,(;oo 00 






1,000 CO 


Sept. 29, 1857. 




500 00 






4,500 00 


Oct. 3, 1857. 


Canceled. 
Cancele'l. 
Canceled. 


10,000 CO 


Oct. 22, 1857. 




10,000 00 






3,000 00 







I 

i 



59 



LIST of Certificates of Wabash a7\d Erie Defended Canal Stock, 
issued from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November y 1857. 



Ko. 



628 
629 
€30 
fM 
632 
633 
634 
635 

636 



TO WHOM ISSUED. 



Ilardman Earle 

Charles Gould 

Oenrsre Pendleton 

Schuchardt and Gebhardt 

Eliza Ralston, of London 

Charlotte Wig<jin 

Catharine Beaumont 

Sieph. Camlrelin? and Jacob Keese, 

Trustees of Emily Bulch 

E. D. Morgan 



Amount. 


$1,000 CO 
500 (0 


500 00 


4,000 00 

cart 00 


C25 00 


025 00 


62.5 00 


3.000 00 



Nov. 3, 1856. 
Dec. 23, 1P56. 
Feb. 27, 1857. 
July 15, 1857. 
Aug. 11, 1857. 



S?pt. 29, 1857. 



REMAEKS. 



For Bonds surrenderttl. 
For Bonds »uiTeuder«d. 



60 



LIST of Cniif cafes of Wabash and Erie Preferred Canal Stock, 
issued on account of Wabash and Eric Canal Bonds, from the 
Slst day (f OLTo6rr,'l856, to the 1st day of Norcmbcr, 1857. 



No. 


TO WHOM ISSUED. 


Amount. 


D:ite. 


REMARKS. 


131 


Jno. nendersoii, Jnn. McEwcn, and 
.Tiihii Smith, TnistOL-s 


$5.(100 00 


.Tune C, 1R37. 





61 



Wabash and Erie Deferred Caval StocI:, issued on account of 
Wabash and Eric Canal Bonds. 



No. 


TO WHOM ISSUED. 


■ Amount. 


Date. 


UEMArjvS. 


113 




$4,000 00 


Nor 1 \9't" 


For Bonds surrendered. 









LIST of Certificates of Wabash ^ Ene Deferred Special Canal 
Stocky issued from the Z\st day of October, 1856, to the \st day 

of November, 1857. 



Mo. 



491 

43t 

433 
434 



rO WHOM ISSUED. 



nardman Earle. 

Hardman Earle 
Charles Gould . . 



$r?5 00 

3,100 00 
387 50 



Dat«. 



Nov. 3, 1850. 
Dec. 23, 185C. 



REMARKS. 



For bonds anrrendered. 

Canceled. 

For original W & Bbnda. 

For bonds suiTendered . 



63 

AMOUNT of Interest -paid to holders of Indiana fwc per cent. 
State Stock, from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. 



Amount of 


Stock. 


$5C0 00 


500 CO 


1,(00 00 


100 (10 


100 LO 


100 (<0 


1,000 00 


3,0(10 00 


3,000 00 


12,000 00 


24,000,00 


10,500 00 


5,000 00 


1,000 00 


377,3i>7 33 


4,000 CO 


60,000 00 


24,000 00 


76,000 no 


5,000 00 


4,000 (10 


3,500 00 


4,500 00 


2,500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


200 00 


11,800 00 


1,000 00 


10,000 00 


1,000 CO 


18,500 00 


25,500 00 


4,500 00 


6,000 00 


9,000 00 


8,000 00 


3,000 00 


20,500 00 


3.500 00 


26,200 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,500 00 


7,500 CO 


2,500 00 


45,000 00 


3,500 00 


141,500 00 


2,500 00 


2,500 00 


5,500 00 


2,500 00 


10,500 00 


2,500 00 


17,500 00 


3,500 00 


37,000 00 


2,500 00 


4,500 00 


4,000 00 


2,500 00 


3,500 00 


S.SiiO 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Miss Hester Giles 

do 

George TownsenJ 

Eliza W. Kice 

Uo 

do 

Peter Hurley 

do 

J. C. GiUisan 

Auditor of Ohio in trust for the Picli- 
away County Bank ; . 

Auditor of Ohio for the use of Pick- 
away County Bank 

Adol))hus Bach 

Alexander Uolmski 

De Rothschild Bros 

N. M. Rothschild & Sons 

Ignace Terlecki 

Auditor of Ohio in trust for Mer- 
chants' Bank, Massillon 

Auditor of Ohio in trust for Starke 
County Bank 

Atwood & Co 

Anna Maria Ilannaford, widow. .. 

Miss M. Jones 

11. W. Kolle 

Sir W.Lloyd 

Wm. McKeitli and others 

Wm. H. Mullen and D. Lloyd . .. 

R. P. & S. Man w:i ring 

Maitland, Phelps & Co., in trust. 

James I'ierson, England 

Emma Smee 

W. Williams 

George Wallis 

S. G. Smith, Brighton 

J. A. & C. Smith, G. Ridley &oth 

Jno & Ed. Ferguson, in trust. . .. 

John Ferguson, N . Y 

Thomas R. Auldje 

John Auldje 

Ouilemo Ilurtado de Amazaga . .. 

Adminiitration Office of Hope Co &c 

Baring Brothers &Co 

Charles Bird, Baltimore 

Wm. T. Blair 

Thomas C . Crawford 

W.J. Spring, Casborne 

Baron Aug. de Steinberg 

Sarah Dillwyn 

F L B Dykes & J G & II C Marshall 

John Gilliat t Co. & H. Hatfield 

Hope & Co., Amsterdam 

Margaret Hart 

Wm. A. Hunkey 

James Howall, of Wadsworth, Surry 

Alfred Janson 

Jean C. Jameson 

Wm. Janeson 

C. A. Jameson, wife of E. P. Berard 

James G. King & Sons 

J G t A G King, Ex'r of J G King. 

Wm. Liddard, Park Road, London . 

Jean C . Labouchere 

A.L.G. B.deLudre 

Eliz. Miller and others 

Wm. Marshall 

S. E. de Maudelsloh, Countess 



Amount 
of Interest. 


When Paid. 


When Due. 


$13 50 


Nov. 3, 1856. 


January, 1856. 


12 50 




July, 1856. 


25 00 


Nov. 8, 185G. 




2 50 


Nov. 11, 185^. 


July, 1855. 


2 50 




January, 1856. 


2 50 




July,1^5:i. 


25 00 


Nov. 14, 1856. 


July, 1^*53. 


75 00 




July, 1S56. 


75 00 


Nov. 22, 1850. 




300 CO 


Dec. 20, 185G. 




600 00 






2C2 50 


Jan. 2,1857. 


January, 1837. 


125 00 






25 00 






9.«3 19 






100 00 


! 


i 


1,500 00 




i 


600 CO 






1,900 00 






125 00 




, 


KiO 00 




' 


87 50 






112 50 






(J2 50 


' 




12 50 




f 


12 50 






5 00 






295 00 






25 00 






250 CO 




' 


S5 00 


. 




4(52 50 






637 50 


' 


, 


112 50 






150 00 






225 00 






200 00 






75 00 






512 50 






87 50 






655 00 




♦ 


25 CO 






25 00 






37 50 






187 50 






62 50 






1,125 00 






87 50 






3,537 50 




• 


62 50 






G2 50 




. 


137 50 






62 .50 






202 50 






62 






437 50 




'■ > 


87 50 






925 00 




' 


62 50 






112 50 






100 00 






62 50 






87 50 




■ . 


62 50 




( 



04 



AMOUNT of Interest jmi'l to hnlJcrs of Indiana fir.c pei- cent. 
State Stock, from the Ms' daj/ of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
JSorcDiber, 1S57. — Conrinned. / 



Amount 
1 Slocli. 


STOCKIJOLDEItS' NAMES. 


.\uioU!:t 
: interest. 


AViionTaia. 


Wlion Duj, 


S2.5 00 
i,0 00 

C,Oi:o to 


II. W. ric":e»nll, Stnitfo;-.! l'I:>ce. 

Col. Jos;j)li rat:e:-s.in 

T:ioiu :s l*,!:; 


C2 5.) 

12 50 

15 I 00 

•JI) (■() 

K2 .50 

]'-5 00 

202 50 

. ' 2(12 51) 

• j 12 5J 

• 1 25 OU 
i 5 ) 00 

37 50 

137 .50 

12 5 1 

12 50 

i 125 00 

1 50 (.0 

250 00 

02 oil 

50 t'O 

5J 00 

337 5J 

i(;2 5a 

2,812 51) 

V5 00 

1 38- 50 

2-. 5 00 

}-::j 00 
4:5 00 

25 00 
112 5'l 

];;2 5.T 

5 1 (yd 

125 00 

25 CO 

1011 00 

87 50 

1 12 50 

25 00 

25 00 

02 50 

£5;) 00 

50 00 

275 00 

137 .50 

02 .50 

137 50 

75 00 

112 .5') 

3r 50 

212 50 

35 ) 00 

02 5i) 

02 50 

737 50 

175 DO 

25 00 

75 00 

lOO 00 

25 00 

1,(25 00 

75 00 

312 .50 

125 00 

125 00 

25 00 

125 00 

2H7 50 


J.an. 2. ISoT". 


Januai-y, 1557. 


81 ( 


.Stanli'V U lAliiis >ii 




6,50 to 
5.(00 00 
10.500-00 


'Willuiuiiii:! K. Sniitli, tiU^tt'c- 

It lilt. Siuii ki-.-i 

Uo' t. St me 




3j,5 to 






.5: Ml to 
1.000 to 
2.000 00 
1.5)0 10 
S.ibO (0 
ano 00 
.'00 00 
5,000 00 


Jjlm Villi itv.liDir 

i -Ai.de S)ii, H) ci&; Co 

i C;u'oIiiiu iScntlcy 

1 Mi-s. .M.u-,' ii-(.-tt I liett.s 

ti & .1 llas'uuU, tx'rs of Mrs M.irv 15 

■(i. nu-u;ui :.. 

James i!a;irill 

! (iLMl-.rf Bi',' s 




2,V00 00 
10,000 00 


1 Jill). U.imsiy Ki-iLsl!, JI. D 




2,5.0 (.0 

2.000 00 

2.1 00 to 
13,5.10 00 


Mui-ijm f. Chase 

W U.c:;;a- 

Miss M;iri;i D,'nmar. 

MissE. Dj,.t 


i 
1 


6.5;J0 00 

Jl2,-.(0 00 

1,00 J 00 


.iohnDillo:i 

Trimas Dji t 




15,5;);) 00 
9,000 (0 
5,'JOO 00 


J- Djiialils )ii & K. X. liennelt tnis 
C .1 lie; r.v J ihn D.uii.ls 




19,000 00 
1,000 00 


Jar.e K ; ai.s 

Joliii N. Korstji- '. ; 




4,5ji' 00 


Itichar 1 Fall 




C,5.)0 00 
2.000 00 
5,000 00 
1.000 00 
4,000 1 


Fer^'usoii, A'>''Ott fc Fergus in, trus. 

Mi<s A.P. Fe.-us,.n 

J. tJo Iman 

J. Uroeir.vofiil 

Kil var I Oru')') 




3,50 ) J 


All leii y ll3,var;l 




4,5U0 00 


11. lis i!iei-t 




l,Oi)U (,0 






1,0 JO 00 


yi. 11 irris 111, Ji' 




2,>0.) (,0 


(l.lliiTiso: 




lU,'ioO 00 


0. Ilol.-.soii 




2.0tO 00 






11,000 00 

5,5 10 (M) I 
2 500 00 


Jo!i;i Kin:; 111 

K. G. Kii-xpatiick 




5.5 ;0 00 
3,000 00 
4,5 ,0 00 


Ciiaries I'r.itt Ke:,iie ly 

TliimiisLilia " 




1,5 lO 0) 
8.500 00 i 
14.000 (.0 
2,5)0 to 


.T. C Iiuxmore 

J iliii 1' isfil Larkiiis, trustee 

J. U. .Mills 


* 


2.5oO OO 
C9,'i00 00 


C.ipt. H. MeyneM ! 




7,0IK) 00 
1,000 OO 


FiMiicis M irioii 

M. .M iiMhiil 




3,000 00 
4.000 00 


Mii.u- F. M. Vaityii 

(!. \V. NiM:ai 




1,000 00 


W liter .Vu •e:it 




41,000 00 






3,000 W) 
12,5.K) 00 
5,0(X) to 


^V. ll.O,'.I;ii 

K. I'ulsr.rl 




5,000 00 
1,0(M) 00 
5 000 0:) 


I>.;!,T Itiiml'y 








11,5 X) Wl 1 


J. il. Itavc.i^liuv 


„ 



65 

AMOUNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana fire per cmt. 
State Stock, from the olst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
Norember, 1857. — Continued. 




0. Ro' inson 

Ui'V. Dr. Andrew Heed 

Kev. Thomiis 11. Ro' insori 

<!. II. S'^cltnn 

l,ei;h ChurcluU Smyth 

I). 11. Safe 

Mrs. C Stock 

Jl. Shank 

Tho=!. T. Silver 

.lames Silver 

Dr. Win. Silver 

M.She.lieM 

R. L. .Tones 

11 r. L. Si'ierijrook 

(i. N. Shore 

W. II. Stiiiiton 

II. L. Tlioniiis 

Miss Mary Tradille 

Mary (J. Thompson 

Oii^l Viviash 

.I.e. Whiteman 

AV. Wilkinson , 

Sir.I. 51. Wilson 

Rev. I) iniel Wheeler 

I,. I'. Wilson St. R. Anderson ■ . . 

Thomas Yates 

Au liter of Indiana for Brookville 

Bank 

. Bowen 

Lyne St ii-lins 

Charles I'ierre Barde 

Miss Susan Banlaere 

Jacijues Clarpere le 

.lem A. C. G intier 

Madame Laurie L. T. DeThiar,! ... 

Thomas Cotterill 

Skinner l.angton 

KdHard Moon 

.Tames Moon 

Richard Moon 

Robert Moon 

Madame M. A.Delamarre 

Cammaun &. Co 

Kmi.Tant Industrial Savings Bank. 

D ivi I Fleming 

Auditor for Bank of Elkhart 

1'. Moorhouse 

S. C. Ahel 

B ink of North America, Clinton. .. 
r. A. Willink&E. Lu How, ex'cut's 

Albert Zahel 

The Au litor of State for Tippecanoe 

Bank 

Auditor of State for Bank of Roch 

ester 

Auditor for Farmers Bank of West 

field 

The Auditor of State for the Bank of 

Attica 

Morrison, Blanhard &. Co 

S A. Fletcher 

Rev. Samuel White 

.Times Cheney 

G. & I. Laurie 

R. Dinwiddle 

Wm. White vri-ht 

Wra. B. Aster 

Robert Neilson 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$37 



When Paid. 



£37 


50 


T2 


5i» 


6>.' 


50 


3" 


ar 


G'-> 


.-i:) 


:^ 


to 


62 


50 


137 


50 


137 


.50 


](.0 (10 


112 


.50 


()2 


.50 


37 


5i) 


3( (0 


12 


50 


112 


5.1 


3- 


50 


T2 


50 


87 


50 


l,2r)0 


(0 


337 


50 


]'o2 


50 


02 


50 


2(;() 


00 


02 


50 


300 


00 


75) 


(0 


rM) 


liO 


25 


i)0 


125 


1,0 


!ii> 


00 


75 


00 


125 


00 


1,312 


50 


25) 


Oil 


112 


5!) 


112 


.511 


(12 


50 


62 


50 


25 


00 


225 


00 


750 00 


15 


00 


C37 


50 


125 


00 


75 


00 


175 


00 


150 00 


25 


00 


375 


00 


12 


50 


250 00 


12 


50 


1,250 


00 


137 


50 


12 


50 


v>n 00 


350 no 


125 


00 


112 


50 


l,2-9 37 


333 


12 



January 2, 1S57. 



When Due. 



January, 1857. 



I n. J.— 5 



66 

AMOUNT of Interest i^aid to hoMcrs of Indiana fee per cent. 

State SfocL;from the Slsf day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. — Coiitiuued. 



^motmt of 
Btock. 



$300 CO 
J,0(IU uo 
],0(;0 LO 

4,000 CO 
500 CO 

s.oco to 

5.000 CO 

e,50u LU 

KIO,uto to 
5,0t0 CO 
13,C€C CO 

2,0CO (0 

M0,UfcO lu 

130.000 00 

1,000 (0 

500 00 

2^00 lU 

50,000 CO 

5,000 10 

3,500 CO 

1,500 CO 

26,CCU CU 

6,0CO CU 

9,500 CO 

5,(iC0 CO 

500 CO 

2,000 CO 

i,oco CO 
»,oco CO 

3,000 CO 

45,tC0 CO 

3,000 CO 

9,0CO CO 

5,000 CO 

W,500 CO 

20,000 CO 

10,000 00 

24,CC(l CO 

6,000 CO 

4,700 (K) 

200 CO 

5,000 U) 

4,(;00 CO 

1,(0!) CO 

13,500 ( 

MO.OOO GO 

e,ooo CO 

5,0CO cc 
5,0Wj ( (I 

e/jco ( II 

9,000 CO 
9,0CO CU 

1,000 00 

•0,000 CO 

3,000 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMKS. 



/iroiint of 
Intel est. 



TThcn Due. 



Amos Willets 

N . A . Caivullio 

W.-LKin;; 

The Auditor for tlie Bank of Sj i;i 

fUSO 

Tlie Auilicoi- lor tlio Jiuiik ol iin.iu. ; 

lit Itiu 

The Au.iitor for lublic Stock l!ail-, 

Newptrt 

Tl.e Auditor fi'r the Bankcf Mur 

saw 

The Auditor for the Bank of Goshen 

Bank of Goshen 

'the Auuitor for I'arke County Uank 

MczliioUiers 

Knickerbocker Fire Insurance t( Hi- 

vary 



Vk'm. Tucker 

Broo-jyii S,i%inf.'S Baiik 

l;^tt'Van Dowench 

0. T. Douisl urgh 

Brown Brothers & Co 

M. W. Collett, trustee 

Tliomas Winans 

ll:a-uni 111 Earie 

Wm C. Bowers 

EJl. Bowers 

IJ. \V. T. lAJali 

Lew is Swizer 

Maury Brothers 

Maury Bro., in trust for A. Maury. . 
Maury Brotliers, in trust for M. II. 

Maury 

Ehira C. Kinsley 

Cleorge E. Baldwin 

Johannes Amsinch 

Henry Amsinch 

E. K. Powers 

Ciiaiies Mills 

The Auditor for Lagrange Bank at 

Lima 

Tlie Treasurer for Lagrange Bank atj 
Lima 

F. Buiz 

L. S. iiuarez and others 

M. X. Jlarmony 

loa-ingo de Sterline 

I-oretizo de Fraucia 

A . .] . de Varona 

I'. Harmony and Nephews 

\V. E Noyes 

Malliilde ller.shfield 

1 r. G. Vandenlosh 

Lieut. Gen. A. .lochmus ....... 

Institulioii for Savin^js of Meicliar.ts 

Clerks 

Tr'asun r of AVi«ronHin in truat f(,r 

Rock Cou..ty Back 

Ezra Jlouck 

VV. lie mond in trust for 8. R.Young 

E . G . Istrkam &. Co 

.laiT.es Suyciam 

Treafurer of Wisconsin for Bank of 

Foil du Lac 

Henry Church 

Indiana liank, Madison 

I'oUeys Ic Butter 



$12 50 
50 CO 
25 CO 

C5 CO 

UO CO 

12 50 

irs CO 

115 CO 

1C2 50 

2,5(0 CO 

ICo CO 

325 CO 

50 10 

2,500 CO 

3 i5(l CO 

25 CO 

Vi .0 

02 50 

l,-:50 CO 

125 CO 

i:7 50 

37 50 

eC5 00 

15U CO 

237 50 

125 LO 

12 50 
.50 00 
25 CO 
210 CO 
75 CO 
1,125 (0 
■;5 CO 

225 CO 

125 CO 
202 50 
5(0 CO 
250 00 
C( CO 
150 (0 
117 50 
5 (.0 
125 CO 
1(0 00 
25 CO 
o37 50 



1.50 CO 
125 00 
125 CO 
212 50 
225 00 

225 CO 

25 CO 

1,250 00 

75 00 



January 2, lf57 



January, 1857. 



67 

AMOUNT of Interest ixdd to holders of Indiana five jier cent. 
State Stock, from, the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857 — Continued. . 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$.500 00 

10,000 00 

10,000 00 
67,000 00 

29,000 00 

10^00 00 
30,000 UO 
3,001) 00 
6,000 00 
1,000 00 
3.000 00 
7,500 00 
5,000 00 
1,5'JO 00 
5,000 00 
1.000 00 
2,500 00 

1,000 00 
8,500 00 
1,0U0 00 

13,000 00 
2,500 00 
1,200 00 

52,000 00 

106,000 00 

6,500 00 

2,000 00 
20,000 00 

6,000 00 
10,000 00 

5,000 00 
17,000 00 

1,000 00 
15,000 00 

15,000 00 

8,000 00 
1,500 CO 
3,500 00 
6,500 00 



5,000 CO 
5,000 00 

2,000 00 

12,51 00 
5,000 00 

10,000 00 
7,000 00 

15,000 00 
2,5U0 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 

10,000 CO 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 



STOCKHOLDEES' NAMES. 



Amount of 
Interest. 



Auditnr of Stite of Indima in trust 

for Indima Bank, Maiiis;)n. . • 
Auilitor of State of Ohio, for Forest 

City Bank 

C. C. Halsted 

Auditor of State of Indiana in trust 

for Cresc..'nt City Bank 

Auditor of State of Indiana in trust 

for Kentucky Stock Bank 

.lolin II. Kngelhurts 

United States Trust Co 

C. W. Faber 

James A. Suy<lam 

Cornelias Brooks 

Joseph K. Snyiler 

A S.Foster 

Charles Andrea 

Fruliling & Groschen 

C. de Rumine 

Rusch, Escher & Rusch. in trust 
Escher & Rusch, Trustees for Von 

Wyeseors 

J. C. Ackerman 

R. D. Ferrari 

J. J. Mercier 

Charles Morrison 

II. Webster ■ 

R. N. Tinson & E. Wi^dust, Trust. 
Treasurer of State of Indiana in trust 

fur Prairie City Bank 

Auditor of State of Indiana in trust 

for Prairie City Bank 

Adams & Buckingham 

S. W. Jones 

Gregorio Jose del Rio Martinez. 

V. C. Calhoun, Ex'r of H. K. Ilai'ral 

W. J. Schenck 

Thomas Marriot and Son 

John Jochmus 

E. T. Burr 

Treasurer of VVinconsin for Bank of 

Ripou 

Treasurer of Wisconsin for State B'k 

at Madison 

R. LaFonta 

Aug. A. A' re Domerque 

Orlando Windsor 

Jno. Edwai'dsand W. A. Jackson, in 
trust for E. L. Edwards, Ex'r for 

A. Edwards 

Auditor of State of Ohio for Forest 

City Bank 

Auditor of State of Ohio for the use 

of Forest City Bank 

Caleb Day 

D. Lyman and E. Parsons 

B. Berend 

John Sne len 

L. Gittings 

Thomas Buchanan 

John Thomas Robertson 

II. Gardner, Trustee 

Strachan & Scott 

Joseph trake 

Sarah L. Harris 

Henry S.Terball 

Jubal Terball 

James Dickey 

H. Winkley 



S12 50 

250 00 
250 00 

1,690 CO 

725 00 
262 50 
750 00 

75 00 
1.50 00 

25 00 

75 UO 
187 50 
125 00 

37 50 
125 00 

25 00 

62 50 
25 CO 



When Paid. 



Jan. 2, 1857 



Jan. 3, 1857. 



When Due. 



January, 1857. 



-a vvi 

212 5j 


25 00 


325 00 


62 5J 


30 to 


1,300 00 


2,650 00 


162 50 


5U 1)0 


5(0 00 


150 00 


250 00 


125 00 


425 CO 


25 00 


375 00 


375 00 


200 00 


37 50 


87 50 


102 50 


125 00 


125 00 


50 00 


312 50 


125 00 


25J 00 


175 00 


375 00 


62 50 


75 00 


75 00 


37 50 


25 00 


100 to 


250 00 


75 00 


100 00 



Jan. 5, 1857. 



68 



AMOUNT of Interest paid to Mders of Indiana fice per cent. 
State Stock, from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day 
tf November, 1857— Continued. 



Amount of 


Stock. 


M/WO CO 


8,000 00 


5,000 00 


2,500 10 


C.000 00 


4,G0() CO 


1,C00 00 


?,(K10 00 


500 00 


3,000 00 


500 CO 


1,000 00 


500 00 


6,400 00 


3jm 00 


ICviOO 00 


S.,5'J0 00 


500 00 


tl.OCO 00 


500 00 


SiJO (H) 


11,000 00 


4,500 00 


e,5oo 00 


10,51)0 00 


5,0(X) 00 


10,200 00 


5,000 00 


15,000 00 


500 00 


5,000 00 


«,5!X) 00 


1,500 00 


8,000 00 


4,000 00 


41,000 00 


5.000 00 


2,.5IX1 00 


500 (JO 


500 00 


3,0(t0 00 


1800 0» 


10,000 00 


15,500 00 


T«,fiOO 00 


10,000 00 


lo.rtoo 00 


1,500 00 


10,000 00 


1,000 Of) 


10,500 f)0 


1,000 00 


8.(H)0 00 


8,500 00 


e.OOO 00 


15,000 fX» 


9.000 00 


8,000 no 


4,000 00 


«a,ooo 00 


4,000 00 



STOCKnOLDEKS' NAMES. 



John Howard March 

Charles A. Clinton 

R. C. Crocheron 

.To:inna C. Houseman 

C. (lautier 

Scipion (le Michalon 

German S tcicty of NeiT York.. . 

Jiihn L. R-);;ers 

William Moore 

W. T. Hooker 

Auiitor of State of Indiana in trust 
for Traders' Bank. Terre Haute . . 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for Bank 
of North America, Nett-])ort 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for Far- 
mers' Itank of Jasper 

Guillermo Terry, Marquis de la Can 
ada 

William Hunter 

Edward Mayer 

Bank of Savings, in the City of New 

York 

Simuel Wells 

J. .\. Underwooil i Son 

Adeline de la Valette 

James Siveetzer 

Nathan Ro'oins 

John Chappclimith 

John B. Chandler 

F. Averille, jr 

1'. Phillips 

r. McClosky 

Ge irge Westfeldt 

John Tunis 

N. Tunis 

N . Tunis. Guardian 

Rebecca Tunis 

Dan Hall 

Geor.;e Lawrence 

Ed. Jones 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for Canal 

Bank, Evansville 

A. N. Hanson 

F . F. Marhury 

John Dow 

Hester Giles 

Oliver N. North 

Carpenter & Ver.idlye 

E. Blackburn. . ..> 

John Rollins 

Thomas Han na 

MiSs L. A. A. Arnould 

Etienne Leon Arnould 

A. L. Audowin 

Jean B. nI. Cotlesquet 

Louise A A. Drolenvaux 

Adoljihe de la S ille de Lourols. . 

Mrs. R. I'.K. Nerhonneau 

Marie Joseph Auguste Pron 

C. L. Rh.n 

Leon Rostan 

C. Delano \ 

C. W. Vorwerck 

Madame C. W. Thorbeck 

Loeschi^'h, Wejendojick &. Co. . . 

F. A. Brooks, Trustee 

Lucy M. Green 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$1,2,50 00 
50 no 

125 r,o 
02 50 

15J 00 

115 on 
25 no 

50 00 

12 5J 

125 00 

12 50 



When Paid. 



Jan. 5, 1857. 



When Due. 



•Tanuary, 1857. 



210 00 




75 00 




1,CC2 50 




937 50 




12 50 




275 00 




12 50 




12 50 




275 on 




112 50 




02 sn 


Jan. 6, 1857 


262 50 




125 00 




255 00 




125 00 




375 00 




12 50 




75 00 




62 50 




37 50 




50 00 




100 00 




1,100 00 




125 00 




C2 50 




12 5f) 




12 50 




75 00 




45 00 




250 00 




387 50 




1,705 00 




250 00 




250 00 




37 50 




250 00 




25 00 




2G2 50 




25 00 




50 00 




C2 50 




200 «0 




375 00 




225 00 




50 00 


Jan. 7, 1857 


100 00 




C50 00 




100 00 


Jan. 8, 1858 



69 

AMOUNT of Interest jxiid to holders of Indiana foe per cent. 
Strde Stock, from the Slst day of October, 185G, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857 — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



$3,CO0 00 
4,UU0 00 
1,(100 00 
3,500 CO 
),000 (H) 
8,0(l0 00 
4,000 00 

e,ooo 00 

2,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
6, (.00 00 
4,5jO 00 

1 l,iOO 00 
I'.OCII (;() 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
5,000 00 
9,000 (H) 
198,000 (10 

75,000 00 

500 00 

7,000 (0 

500 00 

4,5il0 00 

3'i,50) 00 
1,000 00 
6,000 00 
6,000 00 
5U0 00 
1.000 00 

20,000 00 
5,000 (,0 

11,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 

2,000 00 
l(j,000 00 

3,500 00 
7,000 00 
.'i'tO 00 
5(lu 00 
3,000 00 
12,000 00 

2o,(!i;o (.0 

3,5 10 (0 
2,000 00 

],o(;o 00 

6,000 (0 
5,010 (lO 

12,()(;o 00 

5J0 00 
5,0(J0 (0 
2.5uO 00 
4i000 00 
6,000 (.0 

33,500 (.0 
2,1,00 OU 

25,(;(,0 0(t 

3o,0((0 00 
],(i(.0 00 

10,000 00 

1,000 CO 
],(,00 00 
3,()00 CO 



Wm. G. Luckett 

Mrs. .1. L. GuiltTville 

Will. A. S iiiford 

J. L. Uaker 

II. Barde 

A. I'. Butini 

II. M. Chippelle 

J. I). Chatoiiy 

M. C. Grilland 

.1 . K Goupil 

1 1 . Lasseire 

F. J. Miclieli 

F. J. .). (J. Monod 

M'ln-is. I'ro ist & Co 

A. II. .1. L. TivHichin 

F. L. Villiemin 

M. de Yermoloff 

Edward Dolatield 

Hermann Ahl 

S imuel Miller 

Ke^euts of the Smithsonian Inst. .. . 

Uuys de Bordes &. Jordan 

Francis VVesselU 

Mary E. Bet;be 

C.ilvin P. Fuller 

Portsmouth Savings Bank 

M. Vussar, jr 

John (J. Vassar 

Wiliur Curtiss 

J oha Lockie 

J . & J . Lockie 

Victur Bars lion 

Jesse llare 

llemy Willis 

Miss Louisa Oakley 

Treasurer of Indii-na in trust for th? 

Huntingt n Count.\ Bank 

Van Winkle & Wood, Trustees 

E. S. Van Winkle, and E. and J. A, 

(i. Wood, Executors and Ex'.\'.. . . 

Albany Savin^^s Bank 

Charles Fr incoville 

Bryant Burwell 



Amount of 
Interest. 



Peter Schemerhorn 

A. B. Bur lank 

Wm. II. Eiiglisa 

Flank Taylor 

U'Cojipet &. Co. in trust fur E. Balli. 

dj do L.Oakley. 

do do E.W.PosUe. 

Isaac Merritt, Trusiee 

Chas. Davis, Adm'r . f J . B. Clark. . 

Samuel Ki js;uii 

.1 K. UiUiatt & Ci 

Wm. and Wm. U.Oilliatl 

Isaac J. Sjni.r 

Joliu .1 oousin 

Caml ridge City Bank 

(jeor^e liadden 

Bank of Indiana, .Michi ran City ... . 

C. B. Blair T 

\Voudimiy S.veet 

'i'reasurir of Slate of WiSLonsiii ii: 

Iru^t for Wampum Bank 

Wayiie Coui;ty Biaiica liai.k 

llojert S.ierwuU 

II. Massie 



lOO 

25 

87 

25 

200 

100 

50 

50 

(5 

75 

1,50 

112 

287 

5) 

25 

100 

125 

225 

4 950 

I 875 

12 
l"5 

12 
112 
912 

2.5 
150 
150 

12 

2.1 
500 
125 



50 00 
50 00 

400 00 
87 50 

175 00 
12 50 
12 ou 

:5 00 

300 00 
5!I0 00 

87 50 

50 00 

25 00 
150 00 
V^o 00 
3uO 00 

12 .50 
125 00 

C2 5:) 
lou (jO 
15J 00 
t3,- 5i) 

ad 00 
625 00 
75u yM 

25 00 

25) 00 
l5 ou 
25 00 
75 00 



When Paid. 



Jan. 8, 1857 



Jan. 0, 1857 



Jan. 10, 1857 



Jan. 12, 1857. 



Jan. 13, 1857 



Jan. 14, 1657 



Jan. 15, 1857 



Jan. 21, 1857 



Jan. 22, 1F.57 
•Ian. 24, K57 



January, 1857. 



July, 1P5''. 
January, 1857. 



70 

AMOUNT of Interest jmid to holders of Indiana five jx^r cent. State 
Stock, from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of No- 
vember, 1857. — Continued. 



Ajnount of 
Stock. 



81,000 00 

2,000 00 
2,000 00 
49,0C0 00 

5,000 CO 

P,COO 00 

i5r>,ofio 00 

3,0(10 00 
3,000 00 

cm CO 

500 00 
5J0 CO 

i,oriO 00 
*>,ix)o t;o 

SI, 000 00 

8,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 
12,000 00 

29,000 00 

12,500 CO 

3,000 CO 

6,000 CO 
10,000 00 
7.900 00 
l.HOO 00 
4,00(1 CO 
1,.',(I0 CO 
1,500 CO 
4X10 CO 
1,000 (!0 
500 00 

2,:<iio 00 

500 00 

5,IM)0 0(1 

1,000 CO 

1,000 CO 

4.5,000 CO 

1,000 00 

e,.'.iio CO 

500 (0 
1,000 CO 
500 00 
5(K) CO 
1,(M)0 CO 
1,(M0 CO 
1,0(MI 00 
S,Orli (,o 
fi.d.O (II 
e.CCO CO 
0,000 CO 
t.O(N; 0(| 
S,5(;o 00 
S,^00 Wj 
5,5C0 00 

i;..')')0 CO 

2 .5(:0 00 
500 CO 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



C. & E. ■Vr.Thivin? 

Joanna II . Latourette 

Jane E. Latourette 

Auditor for the Southern Bank of 

Indiana 

Treasurer for the Southern Bank of 

Indiana 

Geo. Chamhers 

Auditor for State Debt Sinking Fund 

Central Bank of Wisconsin 

Betsey A. Hart 

Wra . n. Hart 

Daniel Robert 

Jane Robert 

Anna K. Novins 

Louisa E. Nevins 

Auditor for Indiana Farmers Bank, 

Franklin 

Eschar & Rusch in trust for D. C 

Ruan Esher 

Escher & Rusch in trust for Miss C 

Ruan , , 

Geo. To^vnsend 

Auditor of Ohio for Pickaway County 

Bank 

Auditor of Ohio for use of Pickaway 

County Bank 

Auditor of Indiana for Oramercy 

Bank 

Auditor of Indiana for Bank of War 

saw 

A. Perrin 

Alex. 0. Brodie 

E. B. Day, acting trustee 

E . B. Day, acting guardian 

J. D. Bullock 

E. Farrington 

do. 

Lvman Allyn ' 

^\•m. Greaves 

L. Nathan 

L. Price & L . Nathan 

Thomas E. Davis 

F. Vandei-vere 

F. T. Carringtou 

do. 

Auditor for Indiana Stock Bank at 

Laporte 

W. G Street 

N.P. Wells 

N. r. Porter 

Auditor for Bank of Warsaw. . . . 

D. II. Mahan 

do 

L. Lowenliack 

do. 

M. A. Ryan 

Wilkins &. Co 

do 

do 

d 

do. 

James Hutchinson 

do. 



do. 
do. 

do. 
1. F. Jones, 
Stock Bank. 



Cashier of Kentucky 



Amount of 
Interest. 



S05 00 
50 00 
50 00 

1,225 00 

125 00 
200 CO 
3,750 00 
75 00 
75 00 
12 .50 
12 50 
12 .50 
25 00 
50 00 

1,275 00 

50 00 

25 00 
25 00 

300 00 

725 00 

312 50 

75 00 
150 00 
250 00 
197 50 
45 00 
100 00 
37 50 
37 50 
leo CO 
25 00 
12 50 
57 50 
12 50 
125 CO 
25 00 
25 00 

1,125 00 

25 00 

(52 '0 

12 50 

25 00 

12 .50 

12 50 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

2','5 00 

225 00 

225 CO 

225 00 

225 00 

02 50 

02 50 

02 50 

02 50 

02 50 

12 ,50 



When Paid. 



Jan. 26, 1857. 



Jan. 27, 1857. 



Jan. 30, 1857. 



Feb. 3, 1857. 



Feb. 4, 1857. 



Feb. 5, 1857. 
Feb. 0, 1857. 
Feb. 9, 1857. 



Feb. 10, 1857. 
Feb. 17, 1857. 



Feb. 21, 1857 
Feb. 25, 1857 



Feb. 2G, 1857. 
Feb. 27, 1857. 
M irch 4, 1857. 
March 9, 1857. 
March 28, 18.57 
April 2, 18.50. 

April 3, 18.>7. 

April 4, 18.57. 
April 18, 1857.- 



ApriI23, 1857. 



When Due. 



January, 1857 



July, 18.56. 

January, 1857. 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 



July, 1850. 

January, 1857. 

January, 1855. 
July, 18.55. 
January. 1856. 
July, 1855. 
January, 18.57. 
January. 1855. 
July. 185'). 
January, 1850, 
July, t85f;. 
January, 1857. 



71 

A3I0UNT of Interest -paid to holders of Indiana foe per cent. 
State Stocky from the olst day of October, 1856, to the \st day of 
November^ 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Sl.CCO (0 
],0(0 00 
],tCO 00 
3,0(0 CO 

3,ot;o (.0 

9,(;(,0 CO 
8,100 CO 
?,(J00 CO 

ccSbO CO 

3,500 CO 

E2,]00 CO 

1,(00 CO 

i,oco 00 

1,500 CO 

T,5(.0 CO 

2,5(;0 CO 

45.C(.0 CO 

3,5C0 CO 

14],5(i0 CO 

2,5(!0 00 

2,500 CO 

5,500 CO 

2,5.0 (0 

2,5C0 ()0 

17,5C0 CO 

3.5C0 CO 

500 CO 

2,5C0 00 

4,500 CO 

4,000 (0 

2,5;!0 00 

3.500 00 

2.500 CO 

2 500 CO 

500 CO 

C,CI,0 CO 

800 00 

C.5 .0 0(1 

5,0(0 00 

10,500 CO 

30,5(!O CO 

lC0,C(iO 00 

500 CO 

],0C0 CO 

2,CC(I CO 

],5C0 CO 

5,5K0 00 

5L0 00 

500 CO 

5.0C0 CO 

2,000 CO 

10,000 00 

2.5>0 CO 

2,C(iO CO 

2,C00 CO 

13,5! 00 

(i,5' CO 

112,5i0 CO 

],(iCO 00 

15,500 CO 

5.(;( (0 

19.0C0 00 
],( CO CO 
4,5L(I CO 
6.500 CO 
2,CC0 (0 
5,000 CO 
1,0C0 CO 



^yaltcl■ R. Jones 

do. 

do. 

Lockwood Grummon 

.John Charles C!illi.;an 

Thomas U. Auhljo 

.lolin Auhljo 

Guilelmo Ilertado de Amaz.'i;_'a ..... 
Admii.istiation OflSce, Hope & Co. 

Baiini; lirothers & C( 

Chirles IJinl, Baltimore 

Wm. T. Ulaii- 

Thos. C. Crawford 

W. J. SpriTip:, CJasborne 

liaron Am. de StelnCer^ 

Sarah Dillnjn 

F. L. B. Dykes & J. G. & 11 C 
Marshall 

.Tno. Gilliat & Co., & A Hatfield . . 

llope & Co., Amsterdam 

M w^arct Hurt 

Wm. A . Hankey 

James Hoivel! 

Alfred Jansen 

AV m . J ansen 

C. .\. Jameson, wife of E. 1*. Berard 

James G. Kins; & Sons 

James G. King & Sons 

Wm. Liddard, London 

J . C . L iliouchere 

A. L. G. B. de Ludre 

Eli;;. Miller & others 

Wm. Marshall 

S. E. Mendelslosh. Countess, &c. 
II. W. I'ickers-ill. Stratford I'lace 

Col. Joseph Patterson 

Thomas Potts 

Stanley llawlinson 

Williaiuina E. Smith, trustee .... 

Ko' ert Saunders 

Ho'iert Stone 

T. Tivinin^r 

Wm. Louis Winans 

John Vanilenhoif 

Anderson Ilol er & Co 

Caroline Bentley 

Ms. Margaretta Belts 

O. & J . Baijnall, ex's of Mrs. Mary G. 

G. Basnall 

James Bagnall 

Geo. Brings 

John Ramsey Brush, M. D 

Capel Cure 

l^Inrran C. Chase 

W. Docker 

Miss Maria Dennan 

Miss E. Dent 

John Dillon 

Thomas Dent 

Quintin Dick 

J. Donaldson &R. N. Bennett, tru'; 

Wm. Duckworth 

Jane Evans 

John N. Foster , 

Richrrl Fall 

Fcr_'ns.iu, A' pi'att & Fer_;uson, trust'; 

Miss A V. Ferguson 

J . Gii.lman 

J. Greenwood , 



Amount of 


Interest. 


.«!?5 


00 


'J5 


00 


i.'5 


0(1 


"5 


00 


'5 


00 


2V5 


00 


200 00 


'5 


00 


51'- 


50 


^<7 


50 


552 


50 


25 


00 


25 


00 


37 


50 


187 


55 


e-j 


50 


3,125 


00 


87 


50 


3,537 


50 


02 


50 


02 


50 


137 


50 


02 


50 


02 


50 


437 


50 


87 


50 


12 


50 


02 50 


112 


50 


ICO 00 


02 


50 


87 


50 


G2 


50 


02 


50 


12 


50 


150 00 


20 00 


i;;2 


50 


i':5 


00 


202 


50 


7(12 50 


2,5C0 


CO 


12 


50 


25 


CO 


.50 


00 


37 


50 


137 


50 


12 


50 


12 


50 


125 


00 


50 


CO 


250 00 


('2 


50 


50 


00 


50 


CO 


337 


50 


](;2 


50 


2,812 


5.« 


25 


00 


.■',87 


50 


125 


CO 


4:5 


00 


25 


00 


112 


50 


102 


50 


5(1 


CO 


1^5 


CO 


25 CO 1 



April 30, 1857. 

May 27, 1857. 
June 12, 1857. 
July 1, 1857. 



W; en Da©. 



January, 1B56. 
July. 1856. 
January, 1J57. 



July, 1857. 



72 

AMOUNT of Interest imid to holders of Indiana five j^er cent 
State Stock, from the dlst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857 — Continued. 



Amount of 


Stock. 


Q4.000 00 


3,500 CO 


4,500 (10 


1,000 CO 


],00t> 00 


2,500 CO 


10,000 00 


n,GOO CO 


11,000 liO 


5,5(10 00 


2,500 00 


5,500 CO 


3,000 0(1 


4,500 00 


i.r.cii ('ii 


8,3i.O L(i 


14,000 00 


2,5C0 00 


2,500 10 


29.5(0 00 


7,000 00 


1,000 00 


3,000 10 


4,0l;0 CO 


1,0(0 00 


41,C00 CO 


3,000 00 


12,5i;0 10 


5,000 (,0 


1,C(,0 00 


5,0(.0 00 


1),5U0 00 


1,500 00 


9,500 00 


500 CO 


2,500 CO 


],jO.I 1.0 


J,5C0 CO 


3,0011 to 


2,.5(i0 1 


5,5W1 CO 


5,.5(.0 00 


4,000 00 


-I,-.!-" 1 ') 


2.500 UO 


],5U0 (0 


12,000 00 


51)0 IKJ 


4,5t0 00 


1,5<<0 CO 


500 00 


3/>Wl 0(1 


50.t;(,() ()(J 


n,.".(.o (XI 


Cy>W 1)0 


2,.';uo 00 


8,000 (.0 


2,.'i00 (.0 


2/>(M) CO 


0,(,(;o CO 


5.0,0 (() 


4,1X0 (:ll 


?,5 II 00 


4..') (0 


I JV Ml 


5R0 00 


SCO CO 


£00 to 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Edward Grubb 

A'lderley IlowariJ 

H. llebliert 

K . Ilai'rison 

51. Ilarrisuii, jr 

G. IJm'risun 

J. Hodgson 

George Jenkins 

John Kingan 

K. G. Kii-kiiatiick 

Ki.bert Kemp 

Charles Pratt Kennedy 

Thomas Lihon 

F. C. Lukes 

V. C. I.uUcs anil T. and M. Lau:e . 

J. C. l.uxmori; 

John Pascal Larkins, Trustee 

J.n. Mills 

Capt;\in II. Meynell 

James Morrison 

Francis Morton 

M. Marshall 

Major F. M. Martyn 

O. W . Norman 

M'alterNugent 

Overend, Ciurney & Co ■ 

W. Il.Ogden 

R. Pulsford 

Peter Plumley ■ 

John II. Palrner 

Thomas Robinsun 

J . II. R-.ivenshaw ■ 

G. Robinson 

Rev . Dr. Andrew Reed 

Rev. Thomas R. Robinson 

G. II. Skelton 

Lel^U, Chuixhill Sm^ Ih 

D. II. Safe 

.Mrs. C. Stock 

H. Shuiik 

Thomas T. Silver 

Janifs Silver 

Dr. William Silver 

\V. «::'■!'<■!:' 



R. L. Jones 

II. P. L. Sherbrook 

O. N. Shore 

W. H. Slunton 

II. L. Thomas 

Miss Mary Traddle 

Mary G. Thompson 

Oriel Viviash 

J. C. Whit.man 

\V. Wilkin-iii 

Sir J. .M. Wilson .. 

Rev. Daniel Wheeler 

L. P. Wil.ion and R. Anderson. 

Tliumas YatiH 

James Ilutchii son 

WilkinsitCu 

Anna Maria llinnaf .ril, wi lou . 
.Mi^s .M. .I..I.CS 



Ii. W. Kolle 

S'r W. LI'iy.l 

Win. McKeith and others 

Win. II. Miilhn .Liid D. Mcyd.... 

It. I', and T. Manwaiing 

MaltlL.n.1, I'll' Ips Sc Co., in (rust. 



Amount of 

Interest. 



Sioo 
87 

112 
25 
2."> 
02 

250 
50 

137 
02 

137 
75 

112 
37 

250 
02 
62 
737 
1'5 



l,t£5 

'5 

312 

l'J5 

25 

]':5 

2H7 

37 

x37 

12 

02 



02 
137 
137 
ICO I 
II-' . 

02 . 

37 
3(«) I 

1 2 i 
112 , 

37 , 

J2 , 

H7 , 

l.'-5(l I 

"37 , 

1C2 , 

(.2 . 
2(0 

02 

(i2 

VS) 
1(0 



When Paid. 



July 1, 1857 



When Due. 



July, 1857. 



73 

AMOUNT of Interest -paid to holders of Indiana fee per cent 
State Stock, from the Qlst day of October, 185G, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857 — Continued. 



Amount of 

Stuck. 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



§11, WO (.0 

],l,UO (0 

lli.COO 00 

1,0 LO 

18,,5 CO 

£.j,5j0 M 

3,500 CO 
2,000 to 

5.000 00 
1,(;(;0 ((I 

37: ,327 33 
4,(;()0 00 

1.1 Oil 00 

t',UM Ui 

4,>0ll 1(1 

2,0l0 00 

3,1 Oil 00 

3,1 CO 00 

11,5.0 CO 

C,(H,0 to 

4,510 10 

2,010 CO 

4,0CO CO 

52,5'. CO 

34,UL0 00 

ir.ccn 00 

12,0CO CO 

2j,5C0 CO 

1,C00 CO 

2C,0C0 CO 

iJO,roo CO 

44,C00 00 
6,5C0 CO 

i:,cco tc 

21.000 CO 
15,510 CO 
:3,5i.O CO 
CC.OCO OJ 
C7,CC0 CO 
50,500 CO 
20,000 CO 
5-I,0C0 CO 
5!.0 CO 
75,CtO 00 
1CC,CC0 CO 
2,tC0 CO 



James Tieison, Englaml 

Emma Smee 

W. Williims 

Geoive Wallis 

S. G. Smith, Hiighton 

J. A. anil C. Suiith, George Ridley, 

and others 

AVui. Smee, of Rank of England... 

Ur Daniel E. Renkendorf 

Alexander Ilidmski 

Pe Kothscl.ilil Uruthers 

N. M. ILithsdiild &. Sons 

Ignace Terlecki 

Henrietta Rarde 

Al Ijihe 1 ijne Runi.i 

11. M. M. A. M. Cliai.i e.le 

Jules Daniel Chatouy 

Jacques Ferdinand Goujiil 

Henry Lasserre 

MoiTis, I'roost & Co 

Vranciiis Jules >liche:i 

Rev. T. J.J. G.Monod 

A. H. L. .1. Trouchin 

General Michel de VermoloU 

Th imas Cotti rill 

Auditor of State in trust f.jr Indiana 

Scock Bank 

Anditor of State in ti ust fur Earn.eis 

Rank of Westtield 

Au.litor of State in trust fur Rrook 

ville Bank, Brookville 

Auditor of State in trust for Rink 

of Elkhart, Elkhart 

Au lUor of State in trust for Rank 

of Syracuse 

Auditor of State in trujt for I'rairie 

City Rank 

Auditor of Stale in trust for St.^te 

Delit Sinking Fund 

Treasurer of St;ite in trust for Canal 

Rank, Evansville 

Tre isuier of State in trust for Farm- 
ers' Rank, Westfiehl 

'I'.c s..i\..' Ill' .'■ii.uu .i. ii >.s'. I'oi' L,.- 

grange Rank 

Tieisuier f State in trust for Rank 

of G >s'ien 

Treisur r of State in trust fir Tipi e- 

canoe R ink, Logansport 

Tre isurer of State iu trust for Cam- 

IriJge City Rank 

Treasurer of Stale in tru^t f.ir Rank 

of Indiii a. MicM^iin City 

Tr<?asurer of Slate iu trust f,jr Cros- 

ce.t (.ity R. nk 

Tre. surer of State in trust for Indi- 
ana Rank, >ladis m 

Treasurer of State in trust for Ceii- 

tral Rank, Indi .napidi^ 

Trea,-urer of S.'ate in tiu^t for S uth- 

e;ii Bank of Indiana, Tine Hiii.e. 
Tre isuier -.f St ite in trust for S.ilem 

Hank, Oo.-heu 

Tre isurv-T of Suite in ti u.-t for I'r.iirie 

City Bank 

Tre. surer of ^^tate in ti u^t f.^r I';irkt 

Cuui ty Bai k 

Trea.'Uivr of S.ate in trust fur Ili.nt 

iugtun County Raiik 



Amount of 
Interest. 


Uhen Paid. 


■When Due. 


$295 CO 


July 1, 1857. 


July, 1857. 


'-5 On 






250 CO 






25 CO 






4C2 50 






C37 50 






87 511 






50 (;0 






1L5 00 






25 10 






9,4;;3 19 






li;U CD 






25 CO 






21 IC 






Iv U Cli 






50 CO 






■:5 CO 






75 00 






2^7 5 J 






150 to 






112 50 






50 no 






100 00 






1,312 50 






850 CO 






i50 00 






SCO CO 




. 


C37 50 






25 CO 






C50 CO 






r,750 CO 






1,1C0 00 






137 50 






350 CO 






525 CO 






3H7 50 






387 50 






1,5C0 CO 






1,C90 CO 






],CC2 50 






■;50 CO 






1,3.50 CO 






12 50 






1,875 CO 






2,5l() CO 






50 CO 







74, 

A3I0UNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana five }icr cent. 
State Stock, fj'oni the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. — Coutiuued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$54,000 00 

51,000 00 

9,000 00 

T.OOO 00 

33,500 00 

3,000 00 

in.sno 00 
e.5uo 00 

5,000 00 

30,000 00 

6,000 00 

11,500 00 

2,000 0(1 

13.500 00 

14,000 00 

5,000 00 

2,000 (» 

8,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

50,000 00 

2,000 00 

C,500 00 

4.500 00 

3,500 00 

4,500 00 

100,000 00 

800 00 

1,000 00 

6,000 00 

24,1X10 00 

20,000 00 

10,500 00 

200 00 

10,000 00 

4,Tt)0 00 

10,000 00 

].2()0 00 

10,000 (M) 

4,000 (K) 

5, OIK) 00 

20,0(H» IK) 

130,<K10 (M) I 

500 (K) 

9,500 00 

75,fKK) 00 

13,(K«) 00 

70,600 00 

4,5(H) 00 

C,tKM) (K) 

8,(K)0 00 

18,500 00 

51,175 00 
I3,:t25 m 

15.IH)0 IK) 
lll,iiK) IK) 
S.IKX) 00 
8,(KKJ (K) 
5,1KK) IKJ 
10, IKK) 0) 
61,1100 (K) 
20.000 00 
4,IKW im 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Amount 
of Intei-est. 



Treasurer of the State for Kentucky 
Stock Bank. Columlms 

Treasurer of the State for Indiana 
Farmers' Bank, Franklin 

Cammann &0o 

L. GittincTS 

John Tliomiison 

W. G. Luekett 

F. Averill, Jr 

.T. B. Chandler 

Pierrepont Phillips 

Maxwell & Co 

L. Switzer 

Meigs & Greenleaf 

Albert Zabel 

Lieut. Gen. A. Jochmus 

George an.l .John Laurie 

K. Dinwidilie & Co 

Nune Alexandre Carvalho 

.T. Ainsffick 

H. Ainswick 

Escher &. Ilusch, trust for Von Wyss 

Rusoh, Escher & Rusch 

Madame Catherine de Rumine . . 

Morrison, Blanchard & Co 

S. A. Fletcher 

J. Edwards & .)ackson 

John Chappelsmith 

.7. L. Baker 

Wm. Whitewrisht 

Brooklyn Savings Bank 

A . Dnmerque 

AV. C . De Pauw 

Lnrenza de Francia 

Domingo <le Sterling 

L. S. Suarez aud J. Garcia, trustees 

F. Ruiz 

P. Harmony, Nephews & Co 

M. F. Ha'-mony 

A. .1. de Varonn 

C. W. Vorswerck 

R N Tinson & E Windust, trustees. 

.Iu^>al Terball 

II. S. Terball 

Charles Audrae 

Grc'orio .Jose Martinez 

K. P. Domeneck 

Rev. Sam'l White 

Frank Taylor 

Re.'ents of Smithsonian Institution. 

Ch.irlcs Morrison 

Thomas llanna 

.Ino. & Ed. Ferguson, in trust 

.John Ferguson 

.Jni. &L K.I. t'oi'gusjn, with benePiL.. 
Auditor of Ohio for Franklin Bank, 

Portage County 

■Wm. li Astor 

II )! t. Neilson 

Thomas Buchanan 

P. McClosky 

O'.orge Westfeldt 

B. I/i Kouta 

,Mez Brothers 

El. Blackburn 

Atwoo-I & Co 

Lvnc Starling 

Wm. A. Uerjreldt 



$l,3ii5 CO 

1,275 00 
225 00 
175 00 
837 50 

'5 00 
2()2 50 

C2 50 
125 00 
750 00 
150 00 
287 50 

50 00 
337 50 
350 00 
125 00 

50 00 
200 00 

75 00 

62 50 

25 00 

125 00 

1,25) 00 

50 (10 
102 53 
112 50 

87 50 

112 50 

2,500 00 

20 00 

25 00 
250 00 
600 00 
500 00 
202 50 
5 00 
250 Of) 
117 50 
250 00 

30 00 
259 00 
100 00 
125 00 
500 00 
3,250 00 

12 .50 
237 50 
1,875 00 
325 00 
],7(!5 00 
112 50 
150 00 
200 CO 

462 50 
1,2"9 37 
333 12 
375 00 
25 '> 00 
125 00 
21)0 00 
l-'5 00 
250 00 

],.5V5 i;o 

5iH) III) 
100 00 



■When Paid. 



July 1,1857. 



When Due. 



July, 1857. 



75 

A310UNT of Interest paid to Ji aiders of Ivdiava five, per cent. 
State Stock, from the olst day cf October, 185G, to the \st clay of 
November, 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



1,000 CO 
2,i:0() (ill 
2,510 (11 

5.000 ( 
1.(.(.0 (0 

s,i 00 00 

5,0t0 (() 

3,ot:o CO 

SG,CO(> (,0 
H,ri(:o 00 

1.1 (.0 (0 
4,800 CO 
4,li(,0 (;0 

13,0(0 00 
4,C()0 (;0 
6,000 Oil 

4,(;co CO 

6,010 CO 

4,500 00 

5,0(i0 (,0 

5(0 00 

42,500 ( 

45,0C0 00 

3,€C0 CO 

4,000 CO 

5,(:W) I u 

io,rco CO 

4,51.0 (,0 

4,5110 (HI 

2,500 00 

2,5U0 CO 

1,0C0 00 

C.OCO CO 

10,C(.(I CO 

12,000 00 

3, 50(1 00 

3,500 (,0 

10,(,00 CO 

6,0C0 CO 

15,000 CO 

20,000 00 

3,000 U1 

5,000 CO 

12,000 ( 

17,000 CO 

100,000 00 

ll.tOO (0 

50,C(.0 00 

20,000 00 

5,000 1 

I.OC.O (0 

30,5u(i (,li 

2,5. CO 

10,00(1 CO 

10,000 (0 

e,o(:0 00 

10,5C(I CO 
1,'.00 CO 

i.roo CO 

I.MIO CO 

2,(lC0 O'l 
10,(:()0 (.0 

?,5(;0 (0 
15,( CO ( 

3,CC0 CO 



STOCKIIOLDEUS' NAMKS. 



O. Voiulen Busch 

Geoiv'e E. r.alil.vin 

Elvira C. Kin^sley 

Miss Susjin IJanlier 

Cliiirlcs P. IJimle 

J. Claiienle 

Miuiame Thirtrd 

J C. Gantier 

II. W.T. Mali 

R. (le Ferrari 

.1 .1. Meicier 

Lyman Alljn 

II Wiiikk-y 

Adolplius Bach 

Ell. Jones 

C. Gantiei- 

S <lc Michalon 

A. Penin 

Acianis & Bnciiingham 

Maury & Bro., in trust 

do <Io for M II Maurv 

Ed. >:eyer '. 

Ed. I'owers 

C \V. Ta'tr 

liOesclii^jti, AVcsendoncli & Co 

^Vasliiiiirton Insurance Co 

Skinner Langton 

Ed. Moon 

James Moon 

lacliard Moon 

Ro! ert Moon 

M Vassar, .Jr 

J. G. Vassar 

C. A. Ilalstel 

Charles Davi.-i 

Miss Selina Ilendrick 

do 

Treasurer of Wisconsin for the Bank 
of Osh Kos'i 

Treasurer of Wisconsin for the Cen- 
tral Bank, Joi-esville 

Treasurer of \^■isconsin for the Bank 
of Ripou 

Wm. n. English 

S. C. A'el 

Wni r.fdnui.st in trust for S U Young 

A. B. Burlank 

.Tolin Ichmus 

Institution fur savincsmerch'ts elk's 

M. A. Pelan.:irre...T 

J. II. March 

F. A. I'rjoks, trustee 

Ezra Iloi ck 

Mrs. T. r. ITanis 

Portsmouth Savings Bank 

C. E. Rhone 

E. E. Arnold 

Ij. a . A . .\rnold 

L. Rostan 

A. De Lou vis 

E. A. Au'lnuin 

E. A. A . Prolenvaux 

R. I'. F. Nor'iouneau 

M. J. A. Prou 

J. B. M. Cottosquet 

Pniic 11'. S'l'-'rman & Co 

.lohn Tunis 

N. T.nis guardian 1 



Amount 
of Interest. 



30 
f2 

125 
25 
.50 

1C5 

'r> 

003 
212 

120 
ItO 



?25 ( () 



TOO 

130 

115 

]51t 

ri2 

125 

12 

1 .f 02 

1,11:3 

'5 

ICO 

103 

230 

112 

112 

02 

C2 

25 

150 

230 

3(0 



150 CO 



July 1, leST 



3*5 00 






5(0 (0 1 July 2, 1857 


75 (;o 




PJ5 CO 1 




3(0 CO 






425 CO 






2..5('0 CQ 






2-5 00 1 




],?50 00 






030 ( 






123 00 






^3 (0 






!;12 .30 






r.2 50 






250 00 






250 (0 






2( (1 ((I 






2C2 50 




37 3;) 




23 (0 






25 (0 






50 CO 






iai ((I 






8- 3;) 






35 (0 




75 CO 







When Due. 



July, 1S57. 



January 1857. 
July, 1857. 



76 

AMOUNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana jicc -per cent. 
State Stock, from the olst day of October, 185G, to the 1st day 
of Kovcmbe); 1857. — Continued. 



Amonnt of 


Stock. 


$500 no 


1S,00« 00 


15,fi00 00 


15:2,000 00 


65,':00 UO 


^,r>m 00 


5,i.t;o 00 


500 (0 


5.i;oo 00 


50,000 00 


1,000 00 


2,500 00 


17, 'TO (0 


13,000 00 


2,mM) 00 


2,000 IHI 


37.500 (.0 


10,500 00 


3,000 fO 


9,000 00 


10,000 00 


500 Ot 


3,500 00 


2,500 00 


1,000 00 


5,000 (10 


1,000 00 


4,500 0(t 


1,500 00 


12,000 00 


1,000 00 


10,000 00 


211,000 00 


11,000 00 


500 (,0 


500 00 


4,000 00 


.2,000 l;0 


1,000 00 


3.f( en 


10,000 00 


S.CCO 00 


2,000 00 


S4,010 00 


CO.OOO 00 


4,0(0 (0 


5,0(.0 00 


3.51.0 OO 


3,0< ( () 


H,UH) (JO 


5!,(l (,0 


2,(00 00 


i,5;xi ((I 


i,.v.,o oo 


7,000 CO 


9,C(0 CO 


5t;o CO 


5,0(;o 00 


5,0 (.0 


3,000 00 




N.Tunis 

Treasurer of Wisconsin in trust fo. 

Osh Kosh county 1 ank 

Treasurer of Wisconsin in trust for 

Colunii i;i county bank 

Sim Miller, of Lynchburg 

East River Savings Institution 

llose.i We' ster 

Ed Delafield 

Brown, liro. & Co 

II. Earl 

Trios. Winans 

0. T.Donisburg 

M. W.CoUett, trustee of. I. T Head- 

Iim 

IIu..ry Willis 

Knickerbocker Fire Insurance Co . . 

Wm. Tucker 

Chas. A. Clir.ton 

Hank of S.ivin^rs in city of New York 

.John 11. En^'leberts 

.T. R. Snyder 

II. Hill 

Kobt. Sherwell 

John l)ow 

Albany Savings bank 

.lohn Tlios. Uouertson 

W., T.King 

T. Vandervere 

Germ;ui socie'y of City of New Wirk 

.loseph Drake 

Trulding &, Goschen 

P. C. Calhoun, Ex'r of H. II. Ilaral 

.T . C. Ackermm 

W. J. Sciienck ' 

Auditor of Oliio in trust for Forest 

City bank 

Nathan K<'1 ins 

D. Robert 

.lai.e Ro!crt 

Isaac .1 . Senior 

Geo. Lawrence 

Mary Ann Rvan 

^. v.'.- 1 ri ':'.; 

Treasurer of Wisconsin, in tru.st for 

Wampum bank 

.1. H. Litoiuettee 

J. E. ijatourette 

AUilitor uf (Jliio, in trust for Starke 

county 1 ank 

Auilitor of Ohio in trust Merchants' 

! ank. Massil in 

Jlrs. .1. L. Gua.rviile 

R. C. Croc!ii.ron 

Orlando WiiKls.r 

Peter .'^cliemerliorn 

(ie ). Chambers 

Sam. Kisjam • 

<;e<i. Iladden 

)'i.i;e,!4& IJutkr 

inn'i Hall 

Tre. surer of Wisconsin in trust for 
(ieimun liank 

Treasurer of >'. iiidn-ln in tru^t f'^r 
Rank of Foi.dulac 

liii.vs d" I!(>rde< it .li r Ian 

'I lios. Marriot &. son 

Wary E . lie >ee 

Olivia M. Norih 



Amount of 


Interest. 


S!2 


50 


3:5 


CO 


3-5 


CO 


3,800 00 


1,03J CO 


02 50 


1S5 


00 


12 


50 


1^5 


CO 


1,250 CO 1 


ia 


00 


C2 50 1 


CTj 


CO 


325 


00 


50 


00 


5i) 


(:0 


C37 


50 


SO-.* 


50 


75 


00 


225 


CO 


25 


to 


12 


5d 


87 


.50 


C2 50 1 


25 


CO 


12.) 


CO 


25 


00 


112 


50 


37 


5j 


300 


00 


25 


CO 


iSJ 


00 


5^,0 


C(J 


275 


CO 


12 


50 


P2 


50 


100 CO 


50 CO 


55 


00 


C50 00 


50 10 


5u 


CO 


CtO CO 


1.5C0 CO 


1(0 


(0 


125 


(:0 


H7 


5tJ 


7."> 


(t) 


2(.0 


CO 


12 


51) 


50 


M) 


:i; 


r>n 


3, 


5u 


1:5 


CO 


225 


(0 


12 


5 . 


U5 


to 










'li 


CO 



When Paid. 



July 2, 1S57 



July 3, 1857 



July C, K 



July 7,l!-57 



July f-', 1S57 



When Due. 



July, 1857. 



77 

AMOUNT of Interest ixiid to holders of Indiava Five per cent. 
State Stoe/:, from the Mst day of Odohcv, 185G, to the 1st day 
of Nocember^ 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
lotercst. 



$S,3:iO 00 

500 00 

510 00 

5,t)L0 0(1 

7,900 00 

1,8(10 00 

12,5L0 CO 
],1)(aO 11(1 
6,000 00 
6,000 10 

15,5(,0 00 
],010 00 

20,010 00 
2,500 00 

55,000 (0 

20,()00 00 

20,000 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 

500 00 

10,000 00 
500 (H) 
3,(.00 00 
5,0(i0 OO 
6,000 00 

7,000 CO 
.■i.OOO to 
2,5;;o 00 

7,100 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 i:o 
10,000 00 

2,000 00 
1,OCO 00 
1,000 00 
3,0(0 00 
2,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

500 00 
10,000 (,(i 
l,(iOO 00 

500 00 
4,(100 00 
5,000 00 

6,(.oo (m 

2,172 07 

8.172 67 

1,000 00 

500 00 

3,000 00 

1.000 00 

2,500 00 

4,500 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

3,fl00 00 

3,000 00 

4,000 00 

21.000 00 

4,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 

8,500 CO 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



L . Price and L . Nathan 

S. Nathin 

Vim. Mooile 

.lesse Hare 

K. B. Day, trustee 

E. I!. Day, uuardian 

D. hyniaii &. E. I'ariiius 

H Chur;h 

W. Curtis 

C. A ^V^llillk & E. Lullow, ex'is. 

.John Koliins 

Wni. A. Sinfonl 

A', liarsaloi) 

Re' ecca 15. Tunis 

C.Delano 

Ross Winans 

Koss Winans 

•Tames Siveetzer 

V Esierandieu in trust for E. Bolli. 

IVev. E. K. Burr 

H. Gardner, trustee 

A mos Willets 

Waintt ri.'lil & Norris 

Thos. E.Davis 

D. H . Nevins 

A. N. Haiism 

Treasurer of Wisconsin, in trust for 

Roi;l< Island l>ank 

Francis VVessella 

.7. K.Gilliat& Co 

Wrn. & W . H. (iilliat with l;enefit. . 

Chas Francoville 

Vim. Hunter 

S. W.-lones 

Van Winkle & Woo<l. trustees 

E. S. Van Winkle. E. & I. A. C. 
Wooii. executor and executrix. . . . 

Eacher & Rusch I'st for C R Escher 
do do Bliss C. Rhar 

Geo. Townsend 

Henry Massle 

.I.e. Houseman 

W. G. Street 

McKeen & Tousey 

D H. Ulahan 

Alex. Oswulcl Brodie 

C. & E. W. Thevin- 

AVm. 11. Hart 

Lucy M . Green 

1*. Moorehouie, jr 

,lo3. R. Suydam 

Geo. I'eahody &.Co , 

do do 

Wm. Greaves 

N. C. IVirter 

Geo. H. Coutoit 

Bn'ch of State Banklnd.,at Iiid])!'; 

Nathan P. W-lls 

C. P. Fuller 

Anna K. Nevins 

Louisa E . Nevins 

Betsey A. Hart 

Strachun & Scott 

.1, D. Bullock 

E Dumont. President , 

I.ockwood Gummon , 

Wm . Lawrence 

do 

F. F . Marsbury 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$57 50 

12 M 

12 5H 

1C5 (-0 

lit- 5) 

■).) ((I 

312 50 

25 00 

l.jll 00 

1.50 CO 

287 50 

25 00 

500 00 

62 5 ) 

375 00 

SCO 00 

500 (() 

32 5.-) 

5IJ (.0 

25 (.0 

75 00 

12 .50 

250 t 

12 .50 

75 CO 

125 00 

150 00 
175 00 
125 ( 
02 50 
175 CO 
75 00 
50 (0 
50 00 

400 00 
50 CO 
25 (0 
25 00 
75 (.0 
02 5(1 
25 (0 
25 00 
12 50 
250 00 
25 (;o 
12 51) 
100 (0 
125 00 
l.>0 00 
54 32 
54 32 
25 00 
12 5.1 
75 00 
25 CO 
(12 50 
112 .50 
25 (,0 
50 00 
75 00 
75 00 
100 00 
525 00 
100 00 
12 50 
12 .50 
G2 50 



When Paid. 



July 8, 1657. 



July 9, 1P57. 

July 10, 1857. 
July 11, 1857. 

July 14, ie57. 



July 15, 1857. 
July 16, 18.5". 
July 17, 1857. 



July 18, 18.)7. 
July 20, ie57. 

July 22, 18.57. 
July 24, 1857. 

July 27, 18.57. 
July 29, 185T. 
July 30, 1857. 



Aug. 6, 18.57. 

Auc;. 11, 1857. 
Aui:. 13, 18.57. 
Aug. 22, 1857. 
Aug. 24, 1857. 

Aug. 25, 18.57. 
Aug. 27, 1857. 

Aug. 28, 18.57. 
Aug. 29, 1857. 
Sept. 4. 185". 
Sp)it. 8, 185T. 
Sept II, 1K57. 
Sept. 18, 1857. 

Sept. 24, 1857. 



July, 1857. 



.Tan. 1857. 
July 1857. 



Jan. 18.56. 
July, 1857. 



Jan., 1857. 
July 1857. 



Jan., 1857. 
July, 1857. 



78 

A310TJNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana Five j)cr cent. 
State Stock, from the Kist day of October, 1856, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 


STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 


Amount of 
Interest. 


When Paid. 


When Due. 


$5,000 00 
41,000 OJ 


N. E. Noyes 


$125 00 

1,025 CO 
25 10 
25 00 
75 00 


Oct. 8, 1857. 

Oct. 12, 18.57. 
Oct. 20, lb57. 

Oct. 24, 1857. 


July. 1837. 


AuJitor of Olii ) in trust for I'icka- 


1,000 00 
i.oeo 00 
3,000 00 




January, 1857. 
July, 1857. 


(lo 








. 




$iG(J,9U2 50 





79 

AMOUNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana 2 J per cent. 
State Stock, from the olst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day qf 
Noccmbcr, 1857. 



Amount of 


Stock. 


$180 00 


180 00 


3CU 10 


3,TfO 00 


1,000 (/O 


229,030 <).") 


600 00 


4,000 00 


2,100 00 


1,440 00 


1,200 00 


1,507 50 


180 00 


180 OO 


900 00 


Sj^Sa 00 


300 00 


3G0 00 


0,933 00 


3,240 00 


2,884 00 


7,580 00 


1,680 00 


1,340 CO 


440 00 


837 50 


375 00 


69U 00 


5,512 50 


900 00 


16,425 00 


1,260 OO 


113,492 50 


987 50 


1,100 00 


2.232 50 


10,000 00 


1,900 00 


9U0 00 


900 00 


1,427' 50 


180 00 


1,710 00 


90 1 00 


2,030 00 


1,037 50 


180 00 


2,260 00 


1,437 50 


1,900 00 


2,190 00 


10,980 00 


230 00 


335 00 


502 50 


180 CO 


18(1 00 


5,000 00 


1.842 50 


3,350 08 


837 50 


670 00 


670 00 


4.3.35 00 


2,240 00 


34,450 00 


400 00 


5,925 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Miss Hester Giles 

do. 

W. S. Kolei-t 

Adoljitius ISach 

Adrieu, Iseliii &. Co 

N. M. Uutscliil.l & Sjns 

UeUutliscliilil Bruttiei-s 

A tw 00 ! & Co 

Anna Maiia llannaford 

Miss M. Jones 

11. W. Kolle 

Sir W. Llovd 

Wm. II. Mullen & D. I.loyd 

K. l*. & S. Manwiirini: 

Wm. McKeith and oUiers 

,T.G. Smith, itrighten 

Emma Sraee 

Ue.ir^e Wallis 

John Ferguson, N. Y 

Thjs. H. Auljo 

John Auljo 

Administration ottice of Hope & Co . 

O. H . de Amaziij;a 

Baring Brothers &. Co 

Wm. T. Blair 

Sir Wm. CoUiugs 

Thomas C . Crawford 

W. J. S. Casborue ■ ■ 

Barun Aug. de Steinl erg 

Sarah Dillwyn 

T. L. B. Dykes&J.G. &II. C.Mar 

shall 

John Gilliat & Co., & A. Hatfield. 

11 «& <St Co. Amsterdam 

M^?fi'aret Hurt 

Wm. A. Hankey 

James Howell, of Wadsworth 

Anna Ilutiinguer, wife of B". Jameson 

Insinjj'er & Co 

A Ifred Janscn 

William Jansen 

James G. King & Sons 

Wm. Liddard 

Jean Chas. Labouchere 

Eli/.alicth Miller and others 

Wm. Slarshall. of I'aterJale Hall 

S. E. de M.-vndelsloh 

Col. J. Paterson 

Thomas Potts 

Henry M . I'lckersgill 

Robert Sauudei-s 

W. E . Smith, trustee 

T. Twining 

John Vandenhoff 

Anderson He' er & Co 

Mrs. Margaretta Botts 

G. Bignall 

J. Bagnall 

George Biggs 

G. &. J. Bagnall, ex'rof Mrs. Mary B 

Capel Cure 

Morgan C. Chase 

Wm. Dockar 

Miss Maria Dennan 

Miss E . Dent 

John Dillon 

Thomas Dent 

Quintin Dii-k 

J. Donaldson &.R. M. Bennet, trust's! 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$7 26 



4 

47 

15 

3,862 

50 
26 
18 
15 
18 



205 31 

15 -5 

1,418 65 

12 34 

13 75 
35 41 

£00 00 
23 75 
11 25 
11 25 
17 84 
2 25 
21 38 

11 25 
25 37 

12 96 
2 25 

28 25 
17 97 
23 75 

27 38 
137 25 

2 88 

4 19 
6 27 
2 25 
2 25 

62 50 
23 13 
41 87 
10 47 
8 37 
8 37 
54 19 

28 CO 
430 03 

5 00 
74 06 



When Paid. 



Nov. 3, 1856. 



Jan. 2, 1857. 



r\ 



When Due. 



January, 1856. 
July, 1856. 



January, 1857. 



80 

ABFOUNT of Interest jpaid to holders of Indiana 21 per cent. 
State Stoc/:,from ti,e o\U day of October, 185G, to the 1st day 
of Koreniber, 1857 — Continncd. 



Amount of 


Stock. 


$3,0].-, 00 


1/375 00 


^fiSO 00 


360 no 


1.39 J 00 


6T0 00 


1,675 00 


3tJ0 00 


1,440 CO 


1,260 00 


1,5(17 50 


360 00 


360 00 


837 50 


3,350 00 


3.350 00 


2,010 00 


670 (,0 


837 50 


3,0^^5 00 


1,842 5 J 


950 00 


1,842 50 


1,005 00 


1.005 00 


1,507 50 


540 (0 


4,090 00 


2.847 50 


2,520 00 


637 50 


11,532 50 


355 00 


1,125 00 


1,450 00 


1,340 00 


355 00 


13,647 50 


1.140 00 


4,500 00 


1,675 00 


33.3 00 


7,250 00 


1,525 00 


1,675 m 


3,8.52 50 


5]n 00 


3,900 00 


215 00 


837 50 


1,005 00 


775 00 


1,842 51 


1.842 50 


1,340 00 


1,507 50 


540 00 


4,56" (KJ 


240 00 


837 50 


1,507 50 


.540 0<l 


180 00 


1,172 .50 


15,282 .50 


4,528 50 


«.187 50 



STOCKIIOLDKUS' NAMES. 



Col. Henry John Daniell 

Wm. Uuckivorth 

.Ttii.e Kvans 

.Iiihn N. Forster 

Kiclmil Fall 

Miss A. 1". Ker;;usan 

Fer^'uson, Al)boU& Fer^usjn, Trust 

.J . Go Iman 

J. Greenivootl 

E l.viiril (5riO)h 

AiMfi-le.v IIo.var,i 

II. IleM.ert : 

E. II inis in 

M. Havrison, jr 

G. lliin-ison 

Sir F. W. Ileyijate 

Isaac II Oil,' on 

John Iliickblock 

G. .Jenkins 

KIcliaril L. .(ones 

.John Kii)'j;an 

R. G. Kii-kpatrick 

R. Kemp 

('harles I'l'att Keniieily 

Thomas Lihon 

Henry Laver 

F. C Lukes 

F. C. Lukes and T. M. Laine.- . . 

.T. 1'. Larkins, Trustee 

.1. C. Luxmore 

Francis M >rton 

Capt. H. Meynell 

.James Morrison 

M. Marshill 

Major F. M. Martyn 

.John R. Mills 

G. \S'. Norman 

AValt.r Nu'^'cnt 

Overenri. Gurney & Co 

W. H. 0,'<len 

U Pulsfor.l 

Sir .Jefl'iey Prendergast 

.1. II. Palmer 

Palmer, McKillop, Dent & Co.. . 

Peter Plumley 

TliDmas Roliinson 

J. H. Ravenshaw 

G. Hotiinson 

Kev. Dr. Andrew Reid 

Rev. T. R. Robinson 

Dr. H. Safe 

Mrs. Charlotte Stuck 

II. Shunk 

Thomas T. Silver 

.lames Silver 

Dr. Wm. Silver 

W. Sheffield 

H. P. L. Sherbrook 

G.N. Shore 

\V. II. Stanton 

G. H. Skeltm 

II. L. Thomas 

Miss Mary Traddle 

MrB. Mary O. Thompuon 

Oriel Viviasl 

.1 . C Whiteman 

\V. Wilkinson 

Sir J. M. Wilson 



.\mount of 
Interest. 



When Paid. 



$37 09 

20 94 

33 .50 

4 5) 

17 44 
8 38 

20 94 
4 50 

18 00 

15 •;5 

18 84 
4 50 
4 50 
10 47 
41 88 
41 88 
25 12 
8 38 

10 47 
40 06 
e3 (.3 

11 88 
23 (3 

12 r,<\ 

12 56 
18 84 

6 75 
5S 02 
35 53 
31 50 
10 47 
144 16 

4 44 
14 06 

18 13 

16 75 
4 44 

170 60 
14 25 
50 25 
20 94 
4 ]9 
90 02 

19 07 

20 94 

48 15 
6 75 

49 88 

2 69 
10 46 
12 51 

9 09 
23 03 
23 03 
10 75 
18 84 

6 75 
57 00 

3 00 
10 47 
IH 84 

r, 75 

2 25 
14 65 
191 03 
56 53 
27 22 



Jan. 2, les: 



When Due. 



January, 1857 



81 

AMOUNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana 2| per cent. 
State Stock, from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857 — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$775 00 

670 00 

837 50 

540 00 

4,i;80 0:) 

14,402 50 

3,350 00 

1,020 00 

1,620 00 

IHJO 00 

smo 00 

540 00 

8,002 50 
29,160 00 
•20,000 00 
40.000 00 

6,000 00 

20,272 50 

2,000 00 

8,000 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



.M,(i00 00 


167 511 


3,000 00 


17.143 63 


4.4G3 87 


180 00 


360 00 


540 (10 


60,10U 00 


1.000 00 


20,000 00 


360 00 


192 50 


775 00 


l,25i5 2-. 


2,031 25 


3,-75 00 


22,050 00 


12,576 00 


2,062 50 


1,700 01) 


5,487 50 


18,000 00 


10,000 00 


20,000 0(1 


39,405 50 


1,855 00 


10,000 00 


16,777 50 


2,043 00 


31,300 00 


5,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


825 00 


4.080 00 



Rev. Daniel Wheeler 

L. P. Wilson & R. Anderson 

Thomas Yates 

L. C. Smith 

Moran Brothers 

Thomas Cotterill 

Skinner Langton 

Edward Moon 

James Moon 

Richard Moon 

Robert Moon 

Narcissa Stone 

James Ilolford 

A.J. Wolff 

Morrison, Blanchard & Co 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for Elk- 
hart County Bank 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for At- 
lantic Bank 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for tlie 
Fai-mers' Bank, Westfield 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for the 
Atlantic Bank, Jackson 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for the 
Salem Bank 

Elijah Newland ' 

Rev. Samuel White 

Charles Mixter 

Wm. B. Astor 

Robert Neilson 

Amos Willets 

Wm. J. King 

George Kinney 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for the 
Bank of Syracuse 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for the 
Park County Bank 

W. & J. O'Brien 

0. T. Douisbury 

Brown Bros. &c Co 

M. W. CoUett 

M. W. CollettandC.Inman 

M. W. Collett, in trust 

Hardman Earle 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for La 
grange Bank, Lima 

J. M. Lord 

.Tosiah Barnes 

S. Brewster 

L. S. Suarez 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for the 
Traders' Bank, Indianapolis. . 

E. AV. Clark, Dodge & Co 

0. F. Moore 

W. H. Neilson 

Wm. Redmond, Trustee 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for the 
Bank of Warsaw 

Indiana Bank. Madison 

PoUeys & Butler 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for In 
diana Bank 

Sam. Sloan 

J. R. Shield 

Diantha Bunnell 

Auditor of Indiana in ti-ust for Cen- 
tral Bank, Indianapolis 

L. P. Bolles 



Amount of 


Interest. 


$9 69 


8 37 


10 46 


6 75 


58 50 


180 04 


41 88 


20 25 


20 25 


11 25 


11 25 


6 75 


107 53 


304 50 


250 00 


500 00 


75 00 


253 41 


25 00 


100 00 


62 50 


2 09 


38 25 


314 29 


55 80 


2 25 



When Paid. 



4 50 


6 75 


751 25 


♦12 50 


250 00 


4 50 


2 41 


9 69 


15 70 


25 41 


48 44 


275 63 


157 20 


25 78 


21 25 


68 59 


225 00 


125 00 


250 00 


493 32 


23 19 


125 00 


209 72 


25 53 


391 25 


62 50 


37 50 


37 50 


10 31 


50 00 



Jan. 2, 1857. 



When Due. 



January, 1857. 



Jan. 3, 1857. 



1 D. J._6 



82 

A3I0UNT of Interest jyald to holders' of Ivdlaua 2-| -per cent. 
State Stock from the SlH day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. — Continued. 



Amount 
of Stock. 



$44,000 00 

1,080 00 
502 50 
4,080 00 
5,700 00 
900 00 
10,000 00 

12,377 50 

502 50 

3,040 00 

5.000 00 

7,802 50 

540 00 

5,000 00 

1,080 00 

24,000 00 

5,000 00 

190 00 

85,758 00 

21,250 00 

13,500 00 

1,000 00 

10,007 50 

2,980 00 

880 00 

5,540 00 

1,175 OD 

1.175 00 

10,000 00 

1,000 00 

360 00 

360 OO 

230 00 

900 00 

540 00 

1.762 50 

180 00 

1,125 00 

8,060 00 

30,930 00 

12,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,000 00 

2,580 00 

1,520 00 

1,172 50 

4,140 00 

19(' 00 

250 00 

360 00 

3,225 0(J 

50,000 00 

7,200 00 

2,000 00 

360 00 

300 00 

360 00 

360 00 

900 00 

360 00 

2f),(i(X) 00 

540 00 

VA) 00 

170 m 

l,()(.5 WJ 

4.V) 00 

«0,«)0 WJ 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Amount 
of interest. 



When Paid. 



J. M. Morrison, Cash 

Meyer & Stucken 

Fi'uhling & Goschen 

J.J. Mercier 

Charles Morrison 

II. Wel'ster 

The Treasurer for the Prairie City 

Bank 

Eilmund Tweedy 

Dr. GeorL'e R . Chetwood 

R. La Fouta 

Wm. Bolles 

Ball, Black & Co 

J. N. Bradley 

J.D. Beers 

H. Gardner, ti'ustee 

Henry S. Terball 

James X. McLanahan 

AVm . Moore 

Fanners & Mechanics B'k Indiana . 

Edward Mayer 

B'k of Sa,vings in the City of N. Y. . 

Wm. Smith, druggist 

John Lindsley 

H. H. Hunnewell 

do ex'r of J. Welles. 

Nathan Robhins 

Sanford Coley 

do 

P.Phillips 

H.T. Curtiss 

Rev. Charles Jones 

do 

N. Tunis 

C. C. Tunis 

Dan'lIIall 

A.N. Hauson 

Hester Giles 

Olivia M . North 

John Robins 

Duncan, Sherman & Co 

C. Delano 

llussell, Sturges & Co 

A. J. Glossbrenner 

De Launay, Iselin & Clark 

Mrs. J. L. Guderville 

J. L. Baker 

Morris, Provost & Co 

Buys de Bordes & Jordan 

Mary E. Beebe 

John G. Vassar 

Jesse Hare 

Gilniorc & Brotherton 

Silas Wood 

MuiTay Forbes 

C. Yabriskie, Jr., in trust 

do do 

do do 

do do 

Miles White 

Carroll Livingfttjij 

L. C.&. H. T. Pearce 

Dr. J. VV. Miller 

Bryant Burwell - 

do , 

Peter Schermerhorn 

E . Sherwood 

Wm. H. English 



$550 00 
13 50 
6 28 
57 00 i 
71 25 \ 

11 25 

I 
125 00 I 
154 72 I 

6 29 
38 00 
62 58 
98 28 
6 75 
62 50 

13 50 I 
300 00 

62 59 ; 

2 38 

1,071 97 1 

205 63 ■ 

168 75 \ 

12 50 j 
12:5 09 I 

37 25 

11 00 I 
69 25 

14 09 i 
14 69 ; 

125 00 I 

12 50 I 
4 50 ' 
4 50 I 
2 88 I 

11 25 
6 75 

22 03 
2 25 

14 06 
100 75 
386 (i3 
150 00 

62 50 

12 50 
32 25 
19 00 
14 6il 
51 75 

2 37 

3 12 

4 50 
40 31 

625 00 
90 00 
25 00 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 
4 .50 

11 25 
4 50 

250 00 
6 75 
2 13 
2 13 

12 .56 
6 75 

750 00 



Jan. 3,1857. 



When Due 



January, 1857 



Jan. 5, 1857 



Jan. 6, 1857 



Jan. 8, 18.57 



Jan. 9, 
Jan. 10, 
Jan. 12, 



1857 

1857 
1857 



Jan. 13, 1857. 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857 



July, 18.55. 
January, 18.56 
July, 1856. 
January, 1857 



July, 1857. 
January, 185';. 



83 

AMOUNT of Interest j^aid to holders of Indiana 2^ ;:)er cent. 
State Stock, from the ^Ist day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. — Continued. 



Amount 
of Stock. 




«540 00 

1,800 00 

3.832 .50 

290 00 

900 00 

1,800 00 

■-•1,334 00 

920 00 

4,135 00 

5,000 00 

180 00 

380 00 

180 00 

1,920 00 

i28,234 00 

1,080 00 
180 00 
180 00 

leo 00 

3,420 00 

15,187 50 

1,080 00 

1,800 00 

540 00 

540 00 

360 on 

832 50 

832 50 

180 00 

4,010 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

670 00 

180 00 

180 00 

480 00 

480 00 

900 00 

180 00 

180 00 

17,850 00 

17,850 00 

4,000 00 

360 00 

10,000 00 

1,800 00 

1.8(10 00 

380 00 

380 00 

775 00 

775 00 

775 00 

775 00 

775 00 

2,790 00 

2,790 00 

2,790 00 

2,790 00 

2,790 00 

825 00 

825 00 

825 00 

825 00 

825 00 

1,675 00 



Frank Taylor 

Isaac Merrit, trustee 

Chas. Davis, ad'm of J. B. Clark . . 

Sam'l Kissam 

Wm. & Wm. H.«GilIiat 

Jno. K. Gilliat & Co 

Caml ridge City Bank 

George Had Jen 

John Grouse 

Hugh Barclay 

David P. Lord 

Roi>ert Sherwell 

C.& E. W. Thwin- 

Gen. J. G. Totten , 

Auditor of State for State Debt Sink 

ing Fund 

Betsey A. Hart 

Wm. H.Hart 

Dan'l Robert , 

Jane Robert 

David Smith , 

Auditor of Indiana for the Bank of 

W arsaw 

George H. Oldmixon 

Har vey Weed 

E . Farrington .' 

do 

Wm . Greaves 

N. W, Graham 

do 

Thomas E. Davis 

G. W. Norton 

Edgar S. Tweedy 

0. F. Moore 

Robert & Williams 

Mrs. Eliza Tiall 

do 

F.T, Carrlngton 

do 

N. P. Wells 

Ira C. Vorhees 

do 

State of Indiana 

do 

Rhoda A. Fuller 

W, S. Robert 

Auditor of Indiajia for the Bank of 
Warsaw 

F. T. Ferris 

do 

A. C. Kingsland 

do 

D.J. Anderson 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Wilkinsfc Co 

do 

do 

do 

do 

James Hutchinson 

do 

do 

do 

do 

John Ellis 



Amount 
of Interest. 



$0 75 
22 50 
47 90 

3 63 
11 25 
22 50 

266 67 

11 50 
51 69 
62 50 

2 25 

4 75 
2 25 

24 00 

2,852 93 
13 50 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
42 75 

189 84 
13 50 
22 50 
6 75 
6 75 
4 50 
10 41 

10 41 
2 25 

50 12 

25 00 

12 50 

8 38 
2 25 
2 25 
6 00 
6 00 

11 25 
2 25 
2 25 

223 12 

223 12 

50 00 

4 50 

125 00 

22 50 

22 50 

4 75 

4 75 

9 69 
9 69 
9 69 
9 69 
9 69 

34 87 
34 87 
34 87 
34 87 
34 87 
10 31 
10 31 
10 31 
10 31 
10 32 
20 94 




Jan. 15, 1857. 

Jan. 16, 1857. 
Jan. 21, 1857. 
Jan. 22, 1857. 
Jan. 24, 1857. 
Jan. 26, 1857. 
Jan. 29, 1857. 

Jan. 30, 1857. 



Feb. 2, 1857. 

Feb. 4, 1857. 

Feb. 5, 1857. 

Feb. 6, 1857. 

Feb. 9, 1857. 



Feb. 13, 1857. 



Feb. 17, 1857. 
Feb. 19, 1857. 



Feb. 20, 1857 
Feb. 21, 1857 



Feb 25, 1857. 
March 4, 1857. 

March 9, 1857. 

March 16, 1857. 
March 18, 1857. 

March 28, 1857. 
April 11, 1857. 

April 13. 1857. 

April 18, 1857. 



January, 1857. 



April 22, 1857 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857, 
July, lf^56. 
January, 1857. 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
July, 18.56. 
January, 1857. 

July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
January, 1856. 
July. 1856. 
January, 1857. 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
January, 1855. 
July, 1855. 
January, 1856. 
July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
January, 1855. 
July, 1855. 
January, 1856. 
July, 18.56. 
January, 1857. 
January, 1855. 
July, 1&55. 
January, 1856. 
July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 



84 

AMOUXT of LUcrest ■paid to holders of Indiana 2J per cent. 
State Stock, from the olst day of October^ 1856, to the 1st day 
of November^ 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$5,000 00 

9C(> 0(1 

%o ou 

960 00 

960 (iO 

960 00 

960 00 

960 00 

960 t:0 

1,600 00 

.•560 00 

360 00 

360 00 

1,C«0 00 

1,080 00 

i.i>eo 00 

2.50 00 

1,005 00 

3.240 00 

2,8eO 00 

7,380 00 

1,680 00 

1,340 00 

440 00 

837 50 

375 00 

690 00 

2,512 50 

000 00 

16,425 00 

1,260 00 

n:i,492 50 

987 50 

1,100 00 

2,832 50 

M5,000 00 

1,90(J 00 

900 00 

900 00 

1.427 50 

1?0 00 

1,710 00 

900 00 

2.030 00 

l.ii37 50 

IHO 00 

2a'60 00 

1,437 50 

\,9<)0 00 

2,190 00 

10,9«0 <lO 

'i'M) IMI 

1,(>HH 00 

335 < 

502 50 

1?0 00 

180 00 

5,0(K) DO 

l/i42 50 

3;V)0 fiO 

H37 50 i 

670 00 I 

fi70 1,0 

4;):tj (H) ; 

»,240 no 1 

34,4.'.0 (0 

400 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Auditor of Indiana in trust for bank 

of Wars;iw 

Geo. J. Orahim 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 

<lo 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Robert Kelley 

Walter R. Jones 

do do 

do do ■ 

St. .John Smith 

do do 

do do 

H. v. Chapman 

Lockwood Grummon 

Thos. R. Auldjo 

John Auldjo 

Administration otBee, Hope & Co. . 

G. H. Amazaga 

Bariu?, Brothers &Co 

Wm. T. Blair 

Sir Wm. CoUings 

Thos. C . Crawford 

W. J. S. Casborue 

Baroii Aug. de Steinberg 

Sarah Dillwyn 

F L B Dykes & J G & H C Marshall 
Jno. Gilliatt & Co., & A. Hatfield . 

Hope &. Co., Amsterdam 

Margaret Hart 

Wm. A . Hankey 

James Howell 

Anna Hottingeur, wife of F Jameson 

Insin;;er & Co 

Alfred Junson 

William Junson 

James G. King & Sons 

Wm. Liddurd 

.Fenuleha & Labonchere 

Elizabeth Miller and others 

Wm. Marshall, of Paterdale Hall . . 

S . E . DeMandelsloh 

Col. J. Patterson 

Thomas Pott^ 

Henry W. Pickersgill 

llolit. Ssiunders 

W. E. Smith, trustee j 

T. Ti vering 

John VanaenhofT, London 

James G. King & Sons 

Anderson, Hober & Co 

MrB. .Margaretta Betts 

G.lJaanall 

•lames Bagnall 

George Biggs 

G t J Bagnall, ex'rs of Mrs Mary B. 

Capd Cure 

Morgan C. Chjtso 

W. Di>ckar 

Miss Maria Dcnmar 

.Miss K. Dent 

John Dillon 

Thornas Dent 

Quiiitin Dick | 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$62 50 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 CO 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 

12 00 

22 50 
4 50 
4 50 

4 50 

13 50 
13 50 
13 50 

3 83 
12 56 
40 50 
36 00 
92 25 
21 00 

16 75 

5 50 

10 47 

4 09 
8 62 

31 40 

n 25 

215 31 

l.-:. 75 

1,418 65 

12 34 

13 75 
35 41 

20O 00 

23 75 

11 25 

11 25 

17 84 
2 25 

21 38 

n 25 

25 37 

12 96 
2 2.'i 

28 2') 
17 97 
23 75 

27 38 
137 25 

2 88 

13 .50 

4 19 

6 27 
2 25 
2 25 

62 50 
23 03 
41 87 
10 47 
8 37 
8 37 
54 19 

28 00 
430 62 

5 00 



April 22, 1857 



April 28, 1857. 
April 30. 1857. 



May 6, 1857. 



May 19, 1857. 
Mav 27, 1857. 
July 1, 1857. 



When Due. 



Jan., 18,57. 
July, 1853. 
Jan., 18.54. 
July, 1854. 
.Tan.. 1855. 
July, 1855. 
Jan., 18.56. 
July, 18.56. 
Jan., 1857. 

Jan., 1856. 
July, 1856. 
Jan., 18.'->7. 
Jan., 1856. 
July, 1856. 
Jan., 1857. 



July, 1857 



85 

AMOUNT of Interest jxdd to holders of Indiana 2h per cent. 
State Stoek, from the dlst day of October, 1856, to the 1.-7 day 
of November, 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$5,925 00 
1,075 (10 
2,680 00 

3(50 00 
1,395 OO 

670 00 
2,177 50 
1,675 00 

360 00 
1,440 00 
1,260 00 
1,507 50 

360 00 

3.;o 0!j 

837 50 
3,350 00 
2,010 00 

670 00 

837 50 
3,685 00 
1,842 50 

050 00 
1,842 50 
1,005 00 
1,005 00 
1,507 50 

540 00 
4,690 00 
2,847 50 
2,520 00 

837 50 
11,532 50 

355 00 
1,125 00 
1,450 00 
1,340 00 

355 00 
13,647 50 
1,140 00 
4,500 00 

335 00 
7,250 00 
1,525 (;0 
1,675 00 
3,852 50 

540 00 
3,990 00 

215 00 

837 50 
1,005 00 

775 00 
1,842 50 
1,842 50 
1,340 00 
1.507 50 

540 on 

l,5Ci0 00 
240 00 
837 50 

1,507 50 
540 00 
180 00 

1,172 50 
15,282 50 

4,522 50 

2,177 50 
775 00 
670 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



J. Donaldson & R. N. Bennett trus 

Wm. Duckworth 

Jane Erans 

John N. i'orster 

Richard Fall 

Miss A. P. Ferguson 

Ferguson, Abljott & Ferguson, trus 

J. Godman 

J. Greenwood 

Edward (jrubb 

Adderley Howard 

H. Hsbbert 

E. Harrison 

M. IL.iTiiJii, J.- 

G . Harrison 

Isaac Hodgson 

J ohn Huclclilock 

George Jenlvins 

Richard Joi es 

John Kingan 

R. G. Kirkpatrick 

Robt. Kemp 

Charles Pratt Kennedy 

Thomas Lihun 

Henry Laver 

F. C. Lukes 

do and Thomas M. Laine. . 

John Pascal Larkins, trustee 

J. . Luxmore 

Francis Morton 

Capt. H. Meynell 

James Morrison 

M. Mixrshall 

Major F. M. Martyn 

J. R. Mills 

G. W. Norman 

Walter Nugent 

verend, Gurney & Co 

W. H. Ogden 

R. Pulsford 

John H . Palmer 

Palmer, McKillop, Dent, & Co 

Petei' Bumluy 

Thomas Robinson 

J . H . Ravenshaw 

G. RoVjinson 

Rev. Dr. Andrew Reid 

Rev. T. R. Robinson 

D. H. Safe 

Mrs. Charlotte Stock 

H. Shank 

Thos. T. SUver 

James Silver 

Dr. Wm. Silver 

W. Sheffield 

H. P.L. Sherbrook 

G. N. Shore 

W. II. Stanton 

G. H.Skelton 

n. L.Thomas 

Miss Mary Traddle 

Mrs. Mary C. Thomjisoii 

Oriel Viviash 

J. C. Whiteman 

W. Wilkinson 

Sir J. M. Wilson 

Rev. Daniel Wheeler 

L. P. Wilson &K. .\nder30n 



Amount of 


Interest. 


.1174 06 


2(1 94 


33 511 


4 50 


17 44 


8 33 


27 22 


20 94 


4 50 


18 00 


15 75 


18 84 


4 50 


4 50 


10 47 


41 88 


25 12 


8 38 


10 47 


46 06 


23 03 


11 88 


23 03 


12 56 


12 56 


18 84 


75 


53 62 


35 59 


31 50 


10 47 


144 16 


4 44 


14 06 


18 13 


16 75 


4 44 


170 60 


14 25 


46 25 


4 19 


90 62 


19 07 


20 94 


48 15 


6 75 


49 88 


2 69 


10 46 


12 56 


9 69 


23 03 


23 03 


16 75 


18 84 


6 75 


57 00 


3 00 


10 47 


18 84 


6 75 


2 25 


14 C5 


191 03 


56 53 


27 22 


9 69 


8 37 



When Paid. 



July 1,1857 



July, 1857. 



86 

AMOUNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana 2| ^^t'V cent. 
State StO(%from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$837 50 

540 00 

2,790 00 

Sia 00 

2.100 00 

1.440 00 

l,-260 00 

1,507 50 

180 00 

180 00 

900 00 

5,735 00 

360 00 

360 00 

229,030 95 

600 00 

4,140 00 

14,402 50 

18,000 00 

7^597 50 

51,334 00 

46,077 50 

46,000 00 

89,775 00 

•!2,050 00 

52.502 50 

31,272 50 

i=5,758 00 

10,000 00 

1,000 00 

8,000 00 

5,000 00 

241,810 00 

210 00 

210 00 

210 60 

210 00 

210 00 

5,000 00 

10,()(.0 00 

29,160 00 

8,002 50 

1,200 00 

20,(K)0 00 

000 00 

1,172 50 

1^507 5() 

1,507 50 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,487 50 

24,0(KI 00 

167 50 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Amount 
of Interest. 



Thomas Yates 

L. C Smith * 

Wilkins & Co 

James Hutchinson 

Anna Maria Hannaford 

Miss M. Jones 

n. W. KoUe 

Sir AVm. Lloyd 

Wm. H. Mullen & D. Lloyd 

R, P. & S. Manwaring 

Wm. McKeith and others 

S. G. Smith, Brighton 

Emme Smee 

George Wallis 

N. U. Rothschild & Sons 

De Rotlischild Brothers 

Morris Prevost & Co 

Thomas Cotterill 

Auditor of Indiana in trust for Tra 

ders Bank, Indiana 

Auditor of Indianu in ti-ust for Bank 

of Syracuse 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for 

Camliridge City Bank 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for 

Indiana Bank, Madison 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for Tip- 
pecanoe Bank, Logansport 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for 

Bank of Gosport 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for La- 
grange Bank, Lima 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for 

Bank of Goshen 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for 

Farmers Bank, Westfield I 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for Ex-| 

change Bank, Greencastle I 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for^ 

Prairie City Bank i 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust fori 

Parke County Bank 

Treasurer of Indiana in trust for 

Salim Bank 

Treasm-er of Indiana in trust for 

Ky. Stock Bank, Columbus 

Auditor in trust for State Debt Sink- 
ing Fund 

W. H. King 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Wm. Bolles. 

Pitrrcjiont Phillips 

A.J. Wolff 

Jas. Ilolford 

Adrien Isclin & Co 

Morrison, Blanchard & Co 

Miles White 

J.L. Baker 

Wm. Whitewright 

do • 

W. C. DePauw 

E. Newland 

L. S. Suarcz 

II. S.Terball 

Rev. Samuel White 



$10 46 

6 75 
34 87 

10 31 
2(J 25 
18 00 
15 75 
18 84 

2 25 
2 25 

11 25 
71 69 

4 50 

4 50 

2,802 89 

7 50 
51 75 

180 04 



When Paid. 



62 50 

3,022 62 

2 02 

2 62 

2 62 

2 62 

2 62 

62 50 

125 (10 

3(14 50 

107 53 

15 75 

250 00 

11 25 

14 66 

IH H4 

18 84 

125 00 

62 50 

68 59 

300 00 

2 09 



July 1, 1857 



225 00 


94 97 


641 67 


575 97 


575 00 


1,122 18 


275 63 


656 28 


390 91 


1,071 97 


125 00 


12 50 


100 00 



When Due. 



July, 1857. 



July, 1855. 
Jan. 1856. 
July, 1856. 
Jan. 18'>7. 
July, 18.57. 



Jan. 18.57. 
July. 1857. 



87 

A3I0TJNT of Interest paid to holders of Indiana 2| p^r cent. 
State Stock, front tJic olst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day of 
November, 1857. — ContiDuecl. 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$541) 00 

5,700 00 

540 00 

6,933 00 

17,143 03 

4,4153 57 

3,040 00 

4,000 00 

4,680 00 

4,(180 00 

7,86-2 50 

i 1,050 00 

3,250 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

900 00 

900 00 

35,793 00 

360 00 

3,842 50 

1,080 00 

1,680 00 

2,000 00 

60.000 ,00 

1,855 00 

540 00 

1,675 00 

35,070 00 

900 00 

2311 Off 

9ii0 09 

8,000 00 

4,135 00 

2,031 25 

775 00 

1,256 25 

360 00 

182 00 

3,875 00 

4,000 00 

in,oou 00 

13,500 00 

1,000 00 

2,062 50 

380 00 

180 00 

900 00 

900 00 

9U0 00 

9fl0 00 

900 00 

832 50 

360 00 

540 00 

10,007 50 

502 50 

1,080 00 

570 00 

570 00 

5,540 00 

1,587 50 

1,587 50 

180 00 

kO 00 

1,700 00 

1,520 00 

2,000 OU 

• 1,€05 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Frank Taylor 

Charles Morrison 

Narcissa Stone 

John Ferguson 

Wm. B. Astor 

E,obt. Neilsou 

R. LaFonta 

Ativood & Co 

Moran Brothers 

R. de Ferrari 

Ball, Black &;Co 

Ed. Meyer 

Skinner Langton 

Ed. Moon 

James Moon 

Richard Moon 

Robert Moon 

Alanson L. Baldwin 

John G. Vassar 

Cliarles Davis, administrator 

Miss Selina Hendricks 

do 

Indiana Bank 

Wm. H.English 

Wm. Redmond, trustee 

J. M. Bradley , 

John Ellis 

Institution for Savings of Merchants 
Clerks 

C. C. Tunis 

N.Tunis 

Hosea Webster 

James X. McHanahan 

John Grouse 

M. W. CoUett 

do trust for T. D. Headlam 

do trust for C. Inman 

. F. Douisburgh 

Brown Brothers & Co 

H. Earl 

S.P.Bolles 

J. R. Shields 

Bank of Savings in the City of N. Y. 

John H. Englel:'erts 

Josiah Barnes 

Robert Sherwell 

John Dow 

W Buoiiingham 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Adams & Buckingliam 

W.J. King , 

George Kinney 

John Lindsley 

Fruhling & Goschen 

Mever & Stucheii 

H. Mand'jville 

do 

Nathan Robins 

Joliu C. Baldwin 

do 

D. Roliert 

Jane Robert 

Seabury Brewsttr 

Mrs. J. L. Guderville 

Diautha Bunnell 

Peter Schermerhoru 



Amount of 
Interest. 



71 25 
6 75 
86 66 
214 29 
55 80 
38 00 

50 00 
58 50 

51 00 
98 28 

265 63 
41 88 
20 25 

20 25 
11 25 
11 25 

447 41 
4 50 

47 90 

21 00 
21 00 
25 00 

750 00 

23 19 

6 75 

20 94 

438 25 
11 25 
2 88 

11 25 
100 00 

51 69 
25 41 
9 69 
15 70 
4 50 
2 41 

48 44 
50 00 

125 00 
168 75 

12 50 
25 78 

4 75 
2 2.5 
11 25 
11 25 
11 25 
11 25 

11 25 
10 41 

4 50 

75 

125 09 

6 28 

13 50 

7 12 
7 12 

69 25 
19 85 
19 85 
2 25 
2 25 

21 25 
19 00 
25 00 

12 56 



When Paid. 



July 1, 1857 



July 2, 1857. 



July 6, 1857 



July 7, 1857. 



When Due. 



July, 1857. 



January, 185? 
July. 1857. 



July, 1855. 
January, 1856. 
July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
July, 1857. 



January, 1857 
July, 1857. 



Januarj', 1857 
July, 1857. 



AMOUNT of Interest jjaid to holders of Indiana 2| 'per cent. 
State Stock, from the Slst day of October, 1856, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857 — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



$540 00 

10,000 00 

290 00 

29(1 00 

2,043 00 
540 00 
190 OU 

1,175 00 

2,000 00 
250 00 

1,125 00 
190 00 

3,225 00 

8,000 i;o 

20,000 Oil 
1,000 00 
5,000 CO 

900 00 

900 00 

360 00 

12,377 50 

l.OPO 00 

180 00 
4,000 00 
12,000 00 

180 00 
1,920 00 
5,000 00 
1,762 50 

960 Oi) 
],800 00 

900 00 
7,200 00 
2,000 00 
4,000 00 
4,010 00 

180 00 
1,000 00 
3,420 00 
1,260 00 

360 00 
1,466 55 
1,4'!'; 5.) 
10,000 00 

180 00 

360 00 
180 00 

900 00 

1,080 m 

1,800 00 

3,060 00 

J, 340 00 

1,340 00 

1,340 00 

1,(K)5 00 

IFO OO 

180 00 

5,000 00 

420 00 

120 00 

5<X) 00 

51 W 

5<-0 to 

500 0»» 

500 00 

500 00 

5(X) 00 

500 00 



E. Sherwood 

F. A. Brooks, Trustee 

Samuel Kissam 

George Hadden ■ 

PoHeys & Butler 

Daniel Hall 

Buys de Bordes & Jordan 

Sanford Coley ■ 

E. S. Tweedy 

Mary E. Beehe 

Olivia M. North 

Wm. Moore 

Jesse Hare 

John r.a'iins 

0. F. Moore 

B. R. Winthrop, Trustee 

Russell, Sturges & Co 

James Wells 

do 

C. Livingston 

E. Tweedy 

H. Gardner, Trustee 

Amos Willets 

Rhoda A. Fuller 

C. Delane 

Thomas E.Dr^vls 

J. G. Totten 

H.Barclay 

A.N. Hanson 

George J. Graham 

John K. Gilliatt& Co 

Wm. & Wm. H. Gilliatt, with benefit 

Silas Wood 

Murray Forbes 

G. T. Bedell for Mrs. P. Bedell. . 

G. W. Norton 

Wm. H. Hart 

E. Rockwood 

David Smith 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 

Rev. Charles Jones 

Geo. Peabody &Co 

do 

E. W. Clark. Dodge & Co 

Ira C. Voorhies 

Wm . Greaves 

D. P. Lord 

Nathan P AVells 

Betsey A. Hart 

Hai-vey Weed 

Charles Mixter 

Archibald Robertson 

do 

do 

Lockwood Grummon 

William Lawrence 

do 

K. Hcrrick 

WiiiHbnv, Lanier & Co 

do 

T. D. St'.wart 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Amount of 
Interest. 



$0 75 

125 00 

3 03 

11 50 
25 53 

6 75 

2 37 
14 69 
25 00 

3 12 

14 06 
2 3S 

40 31 
11)0 75 
25U 00 

12 50 
62 50 
11 25 

11 25 

4 50 
154 72 

13 .50 
2 25 

50 00 

150 00 

2 25 

24 00 
62 50 
22 03 

12 00 
22 50 

11 25 
90 00 

25 00 
50 00 
50 12 

2 25 

12 50 
42 75 

15 75 
4 50 

18 33 
18 33 
125 00 
2 25 
4 50 
2 25 

11 25 

13 50 
22 50 
38 25 

16 75 
16 75 
16 75 

12 5(! 



62 50 
5 25 

5 25 

6 25 
25 
6 25 
6 25 
6 25 
6 25 
25 
25 



When Paid. 



July 7, 1857. 

July 8, 1857. 
July 9, 1857. 

July 11, 1857. 



July 13, 1857. 
July 14, 1857. 

July 17, 1857. 

July 27, 1857. 
July 30, 1857. 

July 31, 1857. 
Aug. 3, 1857. 
Aug. 4, 18.57. 
Aug. 5, 1857. 
Aug. 6, 1857. 

Aug. 7.1857. 

Aug. 11,1857. 
Aug. 14, 1857. 
Aug. 24, 1857. 
Aug. 28, 1854. 

Sept. 4, 1857. 



Sept. 11, 1857 
Sept. 18, 1857 



Sept 21, 1857 
Oct. 7, 1857. 



When Due. 



July, 1857 



Januarjf, 1857. 
July, 1S57. 



January, 1857. 
July, 1857. 



July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 
July, 1857. 

January, 1857. 
July, 1857. 

January, 1857. 
July, 1857. 
July, 1853. 
January, 1854. 
July, 1854. 
Jiinhary, 1855. 
July, 1855. 
January, 1856. 
July, 1856. 
January, 1857. 



89 



AMOUNT of Intcrtst paid to holders of Indiana 2 J per cent. 
State Stork, from the Slst day of October, 1S5G, to the 1st day 
of November, 1857 — Continued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$500 00 
5(12 50 
3o0 00 

1,080 00 
360 00 
SCO 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



T. D. Stewart 

Dr. Geo. R. Chetwood... 
C. Zalirisliie, jr., intrust. 

St. .John Smith 

G.R. Barry 

G.R.Barry 



Amount of 
Interest. 



28 
4 50 
13 50 
4 51) 
4 50 

§51,065 24 



Oct. 7, 1857 
Oct. 8, 1857 
Oct. 9, 1857 
Oct. 14, 1857 
Oct. 16. 1857 
Oct. 16, 1857 



When Due. 



July, 1857. 



January, 1857 
July, 1857. 



90 

AMOUNT of Interest remaining unpaid to holders of Indiana five 
per cent. State Stock, on the 1st day of November, 1857. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



S500 00 



4,000 00 
500 00 



4,000 00 



500 00 
500 00 



5,500 00 
2,000 00 



1,000 00 



500 00 
2,000 00 



2,500 00 
1,000 00 



500 00 
1,500 00 
5,000 00 
2,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



1,500 00 
5()(» 0(1 

3,000 00 
10,000 00 

l,<KtO 00 
500 IXI 

1,000 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES 

JrLY Dividend, 1848. 
Jones, J.D. &Co 

January Dividend, 1840. 

Gasquet, Wm. & James 

Jones, J.D. & Co 

July Dividend, 1M9. 
Price, Rev. Arthur H 

January Dividend, 18.50. 

Jones, J.D.&Co 

Thiving, C. & E. W 

July Dividend, 1851. 
Mahon, D. H 

January Dividend, 18.52. 

Howell, James 

McClintick, Wm. T. & D. A. Schutte 

.TuiY Dividend, 1852. 
Delano, Dunlevy & Co 

January Dividend, 1853. 

Dayton, Samuel 

Kissane, Daniel, Jr 

July Dividend, 1854. 

AVclister. Hosoa 

AViuslovT, Lanier & Co 

January Dividend, 1853. 

Broad, W 

Hevau, Rol)ert C. L 

Carpenter, Oen. George 

Jones, Richard L 

I'.'ilmcr, Miss M 

Rankin, David 

July Dividend. 1855. 

Bevan, R. C. L 

Burw'.l', Bryant 

ililg';r&. Ci 

Munroe, K. ,S 

Prime & Co 

Wells, Samuel! 

Widsor, Francis 



Amount 
of 

Interest. 



$10 00 



80 00 
10 00 



10 00 
10 00 



110 00 

40 00 



10 00 


40 00 


62 


50 


25 


(10 


35 


50 


37 


50 


125 


00 


62 


.50 


25 


00 


25 


00 


37 50 


12 


50 


75 


00 


250 00 


25 00 


12 


50 


25 


00 



Total. 



$10 00 



90 00 



150 00 



50 00 



287 50 



91 

AMOUNT of Interest remaining unpaid to holders of Indiana Jire 
jm- cent. Stcde Stock, on the 1st day of November, 1857. — Coii- 
tiniied. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



January Dividend, 185G. 

1,000 00 Bank of America, Morocco 

500 00 Ackermaii, Warren 

1,500 00 Bevan, R. C. L 

1,000 00 Bowen, A. II 

500 00 Hm-tshorn Sarah 

35,900 00 Little, .Jacob, & Co 

7,000 00 Winslow. Lanier & Co 



July Dividend, 1850. 

500 00 I Aelverman, Warren 

1,000 00 j Branch of State Banli of Indiana at Indiana 

J, .500 00 I Bevan, Rovert C. L 

1,000 CO Bowen, A. H 

500 00 Beele, Mary E 

500 00 Creske, Cliarles 

500 00 Eyken, Thomas &; Roger 

1,.500 00 Fruhlin;; & Goschen 

500 00 Hartshorn. Sarah 

500 00 Noursel, E. & Co 

11,000 00 Uuderwood, J. A. & Son 

500 00 Valette, Adeline de la 



January Dividend, 1857 

500 00 Auditor for Traders Bank, Terre Haute 

2,000 00 Auditor for Western Bank, Plymouth 

1,000 00 The Branch of the State Bank of Indiana, at Indianapolis 

500 00 Ackerman, Wan-en 

1,500 00 Bevai!, Rol ert C. L 

1,000 00 Bowen, A. H 

500 00 Craske, Charles 

500 00 Eykyn, Thomas & Ro; 

50O 00 Gould, Charles 

500 00 Hartshorn, Sarah 

3,000 00 Nevins,D.H 

100 00 Bice, Eliza W 

1,000 00 Richards, Wm. H 

July Dividend, 1857 

500 00 Ackerman, Warren 

1,500 00 Auditor of Ohio for Savings Bank, Cincinnati 

1,500 00 Bevan, Robert C. L 

1,000 00 Brooks, Con 

1,000 on Bowen, A. H 

500 00 Burwell, Bryant 

3,000 00 Dickey, James 

500 OH Eykyn, Thos. & Roger 

5(10 («J Giles, Miss Hester 

500 00 Gould, Charles 

500 00 Hartshorue, Sarah 

1,000 00 Jones, Walter R 

10,500 00 Jameson, Farquhar 

6,000 00 Johnson. John 

100 (lO Rice, Eliza AV 

1,000 00 Richards, AVm. H 

2,000 00 Thorbeck, Madame B. C. W 

8,400 00 Terry, G Manjuis de la Caua-l 

500 00 Valette, Adeline de la 

500 00 Wells, Samuel 
• 

Total 



Amount 

of 
Interest. 



$25 00 
12 50 
37 50 
25 00 
12 50 
897 50 
175 00 



12 50 
25 00 
37 50 
25 00 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
37 50 
12 50 
12 50 
275 00 
12 50 



12 50 
50 00 
25 00 
12 50 
37 50 
25 00 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
75 00 
2 50 
25 00 



12 50 
37 50 
37 50 
25 00 
25 00 
12 50 
75 00 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
25 00 
202 50 
150 (?0 
2 50 
25 00 
50 00 
210 00 
12 50 
12 50 



Total. 



$1,185 00 



1,025 00 



$4,255 00 



92 

AMOUNT of Interest remaining unpaid to holders of Indiana 2 J 
per cent. State Stock on the Isi day of November, 1857. 



Amount 
of Stock. 



$360 on 

125 00 
137 50 
100 00 
125 VO 
900 CO 
120 00 
187 50 
663 50 
125 00 
,0,987 50 
360 00 
187 50 
fMII) (III 
360 00 

25 00 
275 00 
112 50 
540 00 
662 50 
550 00 
187 50 

12 50 
212 50 
250 00 
100 00 

50 00 

125 00 

1.100 00 

12 50 



137 50 
100 00 
120 00 
662 50 
185 00 
9,987 50 
360 00 
370 00 
3ljii Ou 
IM 00 
900 00 
275 no 
19<l (K) 

25 00 
540 00 
185 00 
550 00 
187 50 

12 50 
100 00 

50 00 

125 (X) 

1,1(M) (iO 

7,377 50 

J2 5J 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Am't of 
Interest. 



137 50 
1-2U 00 
i>C2 50 



Jlly Dividend, 1853. 

Buckingham, Sturges, & Converse, executors 

Bross, T 

Belden, Chas. & Georire 

Clai>p, rhillip 

Dixon, Thomas 

Davis, Isaac 

Dunn, Georce H 

Earle, Thos. & Wm. & Co 

Gowan &; Marx 

He;ullam, T. D 

Iluth, Fred.& Co 

Hope, Geo. T 

Inman, Charles 

.lohii»>ai, S. o.: M.u'-'aret C 

Kock, E'_''nert Jean 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Kraentler & Melville 

Lewis, J . II 

Miller, Dr. James W 

Mills, Thomas • 

Peabody, George 

Powers, II 

Piggot, Edward N 

Richardson, Sir W. H 

Sanderson, R 

Seymour, Isaac 

Sherwood, M. R 

Tiarks, Mrs. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry Loudon 

Watkinson, David 



January Dividend, 1854. 



Belden. Charles & George 

Clapp, Phillip ^ 

Dunn, George H 

Gowan & Marx 

Gruming, John F 

Hu;h, Frederick, & Co 

Hope, George T 

Huth, Frederick 

llupkiiis, Ciiai les W 

Huth, Charles Frederick 

•Tnhnson, Samuel and Mary C. 

Kraentler & Melville 

Kinyon, Varnum S 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Miller, Dr. James W 

Meinertzhagen, D 

Peabody, George 

Powers, II 

Piggot, Edwai-d N 

Seymour, Isaac 

Sherwood, M. 11 

Tiarks, Mr*. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry, London 

Tweedy, Edmund 

Watkinson, David 



July Dividend, 1854. 



Belden, Charles and Georg 

Dunn, George H 

Uowati & Marx 



$4 50 


1 56 


1 72 


1 25 


1 50 


11 25 


1 50 


2 34 


8 28 


1 56 


124 84 


4 50 


2 34 


11 25 


4 50 


31 


3 44 


1 41 


6 75 


8 28 


6 87 


2 34 


16 


2 65 


3 13 


1 25 


62 


1 56 


13 75 


16 


1 72 


1 25 


1 50 


8 28 


2 31 


124 84 


4 50 


4 63 


4 50 


2 31 


11 25 


3 44 


2 37 


31 


6 75 


2 31 


6 87 


2 34 


16 


1 25 


62 


1 56 


13 75 


92 22 


16 


1 71 


1 50 


8 28 



93 



AMOUNT of Interest remaining unpaid to holders of Indiana 2] 
per cent. State Stock, on the 1st day of November, 1857. — Con 
tinued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



$3,860 00 

8,375 00 

1,440 00 

350 00 

190 00 

25 00 

50 00 

1,200 00 

187 50 

12 50 

180 00 

100 00 

50 00 

125 00 

1,100 00 

12 50 

900 00 



180 00 

540 00 

137 50 

1,675 00 

120 00 

662 50 

220 00 

1,340 00 

8,375 00 

1,440 00 

360 00 

360 00 

857 50 

190 00 

25 00 

3,517 50 

2,520 00 

837 50 

1,037 50 

335 00 

50 00 

1,260 00 

187 50 

12 50 

440 00 

1,200 00 

100 00 

62 50 

125 00 

1,100 00 

5,025 00 

12 50 



540 00 

137 50 

662 50 

220 00 

1,340 00 

8,375 00 

1,440 00 

360 00 

360 eo 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



July Dividknd, 1854. 

Hunnewell, H. 11 

Huth, F. &Co 

Ilyslop, Roliei-t 

Hope, George T 

Kinnyon, V. S 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Peabody, George 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 

Powers, H 

Piggott, E. N 

Robert, Daniel 

Seymour, Isaac 

Sherwood, M. R 

Tiarks, Sarah 

Tucker, Henry, London 

Watkinson, David 

Webster, Hosea 

Jaruary Dividend, 1855. 

Broad, W 

Bevan, Roljert C . L . . . .■ 

Belden, ^ harles and George 

Carpenter, Gen. George 

Dunn, George H 

Gowan & Marx 

Gridley, Robert 

Henderson, Ann E 

Huth, F. & Co 

Ilyslop, Robert 

Hope, George T 

Hopkins, Charles W. Guardian, &c 

Jones, Richard L 

Kinnyon, V. S 

Kill)ourne, D. W 

Moiling, Godfrey 

Morton, Francis 

Meynell, Captain H 

Mandelsloh, Sarah Ellen De 

Palmer, Miss M 

Peabody, George 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 

Powers H 

Piggott, E.N 

Rankin, David 

Sanderson & Co 

Seymour, Isaac 

Twyman, Charles 

Tiarks, Mrs. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry, London 

Wilson, T., & Co., London 

Watkinson, David 

July Dividend, 1855. 

Bevan, R. C. L 

Belden, C.&G 

Gowan & Marx 

Gridley, Robert 

Henderson, Ann E 

Huth, F. & Co 

Ilyslop, Robert 

Hope, George T 

Hopkins, Charles W 



Am't of 
Interest. 



.f 48 25 



104 68 


18 00 


4 50 


2 37 


31 


62 


15 75 


2 34 


15 


2 25 


1 25 


62 


1 56 


13 ■;5 


15 


11 25 



6 75 


1 72 


20 93 


1 50 


8 28 


2 75 


16 75 


1(14 00 


IS 00 


4 50 


4 50 


10 47 


2 38 


31 


43 97 


31 :0 


10 47 


12 97 


4 19 


02 


15 75 


2 34 


16 


5 50 


15 00 


1 25 


78 


1 56 


13 75 


62 81 


16 


6 75 


1 72 


8 28 






IB 75 


104 69 


18 00 


4 50 


4 50 



$239 09 



$428 



94 



AMOUNT of Interest remaining unpaid to holders of Indiana 2-^- 
}XT cent. State Stock, on the Ist day of JVovember, 1857 — Con- 
tinued. 




Amount of 


Stock. 


$360 00 
190 00 


25 00 


50 00 


1.260 00 
187 50 


12 50 


- 1,200 00 
100 00 


180 00 


62 50 


125 00 


1,100 00 
2,000 00 


12 50 


175 00 


347 50 



ISO 00 
510 0< 

137 50 

662 50 

3,860 00 

1,340 I 

8.375 00 

1,440 0(1 

360 00 

360 00 

ISO 00 

360 00 

190 00 

25 00 

50 00 

1,260 00 

187 50 

12 50 

1,200 00 

100 00 

62 50 

12.5 00 

1,100 00 

175 00 

12 50 



825 00 
502 50 
180 00 
540 OO 
180 (K) 
137 50 
250 00 
190 (H» 
180 (HI 
3<i2 .50 
062 .'iO 
8,375 00 
1,440 00 
1,340 (K) 
360 00 
3(;0 00 



Judson, Charles 

Kinnyon, V. S 

Kilhoui'ue, D. W 

Peabody, George 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 

Powers, H 

Piggot, E.N 

S;iuderson & Co 

Seymour, Isaac 

Thompson, W 

Twyman, Charles 

Traiks, Mrs. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry (London) 

Tweedy, Edgar S 

■\Vatkinson, David 

■Wood, Grant &Co 

Wells, S;unuel 

January Dividend, 1850. 

Ackerman, W 

Bevan, R. C. L 

Belden, C . and G 

Gowan & Marx 

Hunnewell, II. II 

Henderson, Ann E 

Iluth, F.&Co 

Ilyslop, Robert 

Hope, George 

Hopkins, Charles W., Guardian 

Hartshorne, Sarah 

Judson, Charles 

Kinnyon. V. S 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Peabody, George 

Phelps, Dodge &Co 

Po'.vcrs, H ■ 

Piggot, E.N 

Sanderson & Co 

Seymour, Isaac 

Twyman, Charles 

Tiarks, Mrs. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry (London) 

Wood, Grant & Co 

Watkinson, David 

JvLY Dividend, 1856. 

Treasurer of Indiana for Central Bank, Indianapolis 

Allen, Emma 

Ackerman. W 

Bevan, Hobert C . L 

Banks, David 

Belden, Charles fleorge 

licebee, Mary E 

Craske, Charles 

Dow, .John 

Kykyn, Thomas and Roger 

Oowan &. Marx 

Huth, F. &. Cf 

Ilyslop, Kolicrt 

Henderson, Ann E 

Hope, George, T 

JIo].kin8, CharleH W., Guardian 



Amount of 

Interest. 


Total 


$4 50 




■ 2 38 




31 




62 




15 75 




2 34 




16 




15 00 




1 25 




2 25 




78 




1 56 




13 75 




25 00 




16 




2 18 




4 34 






$260 27 


$2 25 


6 75 




1 71 




8 27 




48 25 




16 75 




104 69 




18 00 




4 50 




4 50 




2 25 




4 50 




2 38 




31 




63 




15 75 




3 34 




16 




15 00 




1 25 




78 




I 56 




13 75 




2 19 




16 






$278 C8 




10 31 




6 27 




2 25 




6 75 




2 25 




1 71 




3 12 




2 37 




2 25 




4 53 




8 27 




104 69 




18 00 




16 75 




4 50 




4 50 





05 



AMOUNT of Interest remihiing 'inpa'd to holders of Indiana 21 
■per cent. State Stock, on the !.<!/ day of Xorember, 1857 — Con- 
tinued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



«180 00 
3G0 00 
180 00 
191) 00 
25 00 
50 00 

i.e(3o 00 

l.-^T 50 

K 5;) 

480 00 
1,200 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

6-2 50 

125 00 

1,100 00 

19 50 

175 00 



502 50 

180 00 
540 00 
180 00 
137 50 
262 50 
572 50 
190 00 
180 00 
420 00 
362 50 
387 50 
662 50 
1,340 00 
8.375 00 
1.440 00 
360 00 
360 00 
180 00 

360 on 

180 00 
190 00 

25 00 

50 00 

1,260 00 

187 50 

12 50 

480 00 

100 00 

1,1100 00 

62 50 

125 00 

1,100 00 

12 50 
175 00 
347 50 



775 00 

502 50 

180 00 

30,000 00 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Hartshorne, Sarah 

Judson, Charles 

Kean, John 

Kinnyon, V. S 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Peahody, George 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 

Powers, H 

Piggot,E.N 

Richards, Wm. II 

Sanderson & Co 

Seymour, Isaac 

Sharps, Thomas II 

Twyman, Charles 

Tiarks, Mrs. Sarah 

Tuckel-, Henry (London). 

Watkinson, David 

Wood, Grant & Co 




jANtARY Dividend, 1857. 



Allen, Emma 

Ackerman, Warren 

Bevan, Robert C. L 

Banks. David .' 

Belden, C. and G 

Beebe &Co 

BeeVie, George W 

Craske, Charles 

Dow, John 

Diossy, Addison S 

Eykvn, Thomas and R^ger . . . . 

Gouid, Charles 

Gowan &. Marx 

Henderson. Ann E 

Huth, F. & Co 

Hyslop, Robert 

Hope, (jeorge T ■ 

Hopkins, Charles W. Guardian 

Hartshorne, Sarah 

Judson, C diaries 

Kean, John 

Kinnyon, V. S 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Peabody, George 

Phelps, Dodge &Co 

Powers, H 

Pii:got,E.N 

Richards, William II 

Seymour, Is;uic 

Shaqie, Thomas H 

Twyman, Charles 

Tiarks, Sirs. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry (London) 

Watkinson, David 

Wood, Grant Sc Co 

Wells, Samuel 



July Dividend, 1857. 

Anderson, D. J 

Allen, Emma 

Ackerman, Warren 

Auditor of Ohio for Champaign County Bank 



6 28 
2 25 
6 75 

2 25 

1 72 

3 28 
6 41 

2 37 
2 25 

5 25 

4 53 
4 84 
8 28 

16 75 

104 69 

18 00 

4 50 

4 50 

2 25 

4 50 

2 25 

2 38 

31 

63 

15 75 

2 34 

16 

6 00 
1 25 

12 50 
78 



9 69 

6 28 

2 25 

375 00 



Total. 



J282 28 



96 



AMOZ^NT of Interest remainhig unpaid to holders of Indiayia 2J 
per cent. State Stovl:, oy the \sf day of Noi:embcr, 1857. — Con- 
tinued. 



Amount of 
Stock. 



S540 00 

180 0(1 

137 50 

2Ce 50 

170 00 

512 50 

190-00 

•JdO 00 

4C0 00 

362 50 

510 00 

1,800 00 

180 OO 

6C2 50 

387 50 

2 980 00 

1,340 00 

f-,3:5 00 

1,440 00 

360 00 

300 00 

180 00 

880 00 

360 00 

360 00 

1,800 00 

180 00 

190 00 

380 (.0 

25 00 

50 00 

187 50 

12 50 

670 00 

3C0 00 

4»0 00 

100 00 

180 00 

62 50 

12.5 m 

1,100 ill 

180 00 

1.000 00 

12 50 

175 00 

347 50 



STOCKHOLDERS' NAMES. 



Bevan, Robert C. L 

Banks. David 

Belden , Charles & George 

Beebe & Co 

Bry nt Burwel". . 

Bedie, Geo. W 

Craske, Charles 

Chapman, H. P 

Diossy, Addison S 

Ej-ky n, Thos. & Rogers 

Farrinffton, E 

Ferris,"F. T 

Giles, Miss Hester 

Gowan & Marx 

Gould, Charles 

Hunnewell, II. H 

Henderson, Ann E 

Huth, F. & Co 

Hyslop, Robert 

Hope, George T 

Hopkins, Charles W., guardian 

Hartshorne, Sarah 

Hunnewell, H. H., executor of J. Welles 

Jones, Walter R 

Judson, Charles 

Kelly, Wm 

Kean, John 

Kinnyon. V. S 

Kingsland, A. C 

Kilbourne, D. W 

Peabody, Geo 

Powers. H 

Pi-got, E.N 

Robert & Williams 

Robert, W. S 

Richards, W. II 

Seymour, Isaac 

Thiving, C. &E. W 

Tn-yman, Charles 

Tiarks, Mrs. Sarah 

Tucker, Henry, London 

Viall, Mrs. Eliza 

\anderpool, A 

Watkinson, David 

Wood. Grant & Co 

Wells, Samuel 

Total 



Amount of 
Interest. 



8 

4 

37 

16 

104 
18 
4 
4 
o 

11 
4 
4 



Tutal. 



S7';8 83 



$3,082 74 



97 

AMOUNT of Exi^enscs of the Agency, including Salary of Agent, 
Stationery and Postage, from the Slst day of October, 1856, to 
the Ist day of November, 1857. 



FIRST QUARTER. 

Amount paid for postage 

Amount paid W. R. Nofsinger for signing bonds 

Amount paid for expenses and telegraph chaixes 

Amount paid for stationery 

Amount paid for advertising 

Amount paid for box rent at post-ofiice 

Amount jiaid salary of Agent 

Amount paid rent of offices 

SECOXD QUARTER. ■ 

Amount paid for postage 

Amount paid for express and telegraph charges 

Amount paid for stationery 

Amount paid personal expenses of Agent in attending suit at Indianapolis 

Amount paid salary of Agent 

Amount paid rent of offices 

THIRD QUARTER. 

Amount paid for p«stage 

Amount paid telegraph and express charges 

Amount paid for stationery 

Amount paid Latimer Brothers bill for engraving 

Amount paid box rent at post-office 

Amount paid salary of Agent 

Amount paid rent of offices 

Amount paid exchange on coupons ....'. 

Amount paid for advertising 

FOURTH QUARTER. 

Amount paid for postage 

Amount paid for stationery 

Amount paid J. Hughes attorneys fees in thi'ee suits 

Amount jjaid C. L. Dunham attorneys fees 

Amount paid salary of Agent 

Amount paid rent of offices 

Total 




5 G3 

it 35 

8 40 

2.15 M 

3 00 
Ci!5 00 
200 00 

4 50 

5 CO 



11 75 

44 50 
500 00 

50 00 
625 00 
200 00 



S913 61 



951 15 



1,096 22 



1,431 25 



$4,392 20 



1 D. J.— T 



98 



00 



■<5 






CO 
CO 






^^ 






Total. 


25S§ 




.3 1 ^i^^ 


3 u- 

1 ^ 


i 2 

o 

§ 




. 




_c 


1 


Kind of Stock. 


•- o o o 


1 
1 

i « 

1 M 
! Oi 

Ij "2. 

' 2 
' <=> 

! 
1 

1 


s 

c - 

C-1 ♦- 






z 


is 

CO 

"3 

.a 

a 

3 
o 

i 

o 


Amount. 


SsSiS 

pill 

x' i-T ,-.■ c" 


o 
x. 
Si 


00 C. PI c, 
o -T -r o '-"i 




c 




5, 


- ' 


5 


1 



Doc. No. 2.] [Parti. 

ANNUAL REPOET 



OP THE 



TREASURER OF STATE 



OF THE 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



SHOWING THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE TREASURY 
DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1857. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE PRINTER, 

1 8 .5 7 . 
1 I). J._8. 



REPORT. 



OFFICE OF THE TliEASURER OF f^TATE, \ 
Indianapolis, Nov. 1, 1857. | 

To His Excellency, Ashbel P. Willard, 

Governor of Indiana : 

Sir: — I herewith submit my annual report of the receipts and 
expenditures of this department for the fiscal year ending Oct. 
81,1857. 

Balance in the treasury as shown by 

the report of my predecessor, Nov. 

1, 1856, to the legislature $624,735 03 

Amount received from all sources 

during last fiscal year 1,774,675 14 

Total receipts $2,399,410 17 

Disbursements. ■ \ 

For the fiscal year last past $1,748,756 69 

Balance in the treasury, Nov. 1, 1857 650,653 48 

•Total disbursements $2,399,410 17 

Receipts for fiscal year ending October 31, 1857. 
Balance in the treasury, year ending Oct. 31, 1856.. $624,735 03 



104 

Bceeipts upon accounts as follows: 

On account of Revciuio $(354,431 33 

On account of ' Blind Asylum 3,627 58 

On account of Colleire Fund 8,574 43 

On account of sale lievised Statutes 278 50 

On account of Library Tax 11,276 85 

On account of Cona-res^^ional Township Fund 423 05 

On account of State r>ebt Sinking Fund 67,342 78 

On account of Colonization 25 00 

On account of Surplus Revenue 77 00 

On account of Swaiii]» Lands 362,101 57 

On account of State Prison 31,827 62 

On account of Bank Tax Funil 3,666 79 

On account of Saline Fund 6,565 76 

On account of Comnuui Schools 416,120 84 

On account of Governors House 11 00 

On account of Deaf and Lund t Asylum 2,304 77 

On account of Miscellaneous 1,010 39 

On account of Militia 2,145 00 

On account of Hos})ita! for Insane 4,409 67 

On acconnt of Estates without Heirs 260 35 

On account of Michigan Kotid Lands 63 50 

Oo account of Grovcrnor's Cii-cle 665 00 

On acconnt of Wahnsli and rh-ie (^ana! 197,466 36 

$2,3 99,410 17 

f, mSTUIRS^.MM.VTS. 

On nc'K.unt of Rev.MiM. $5,160 97 

On account of Bhnd Aylnni 19,954 51 

On :v;.-'onnt of College- :'\ni.' 5,102 74 

On acoMiit of Lil)ni:y Ta:; 100 65 

On ac(.-onnt of (Jongrcs-ion;;! Ton ■ns'iiiii 57 46 

Oti acconnt of State \)'Aa rink'ng i-'i'inl 70 72 

On acconnt of 0()l(/ni;-.;i''Mi; 5()6 00 

On ac<_v)ii)it of Snj-plii- i^ivciiiic 25 74 

On ac^-onnt of Swanij \.'a\v.\- 107,872 21 

Oh account of State Trinon .'■(), !/;>l 24 



105 

On account of Bank Tax Fund 68 26 

On account of Saline Fund 124 51 

On account of Common Schools 381,228 90^ 

On account of Prosecuting Attorneys 3,770 07 

On account of State House 2,915 31 

On account of Governor's House 2,045 51 

On account of Presidential Election 954 07 

On account of Contingent 2,383 17 

On account of Executive 5,413 20 

On account of Judiciary 19,260 60 

On account of Fuel and Stationery 7,615 47 

On account of Public Printing 18,408 51 

On account of Expense Supreme Court 2,476 80 

On account of Legislation 51,970 54 

On account of Deaf and Dumb Asylum 16,132 02 

On account of ^lisfollaucous 3,823 55 

On account of Township Libraries 23,750 08 

On account of Specific Appropriations 19,210 66 

On account of Militia 327 41 

On account of Professors Salaries 4,564 83 

On account of Interest and Exchange 3,260 00 

On account of Distribution of Laws 990 23 

On account of Free Banking 3,327 00 

On account of State Library 1,251 03 

On account of Hospital for Lisane 26,778 46 

On account of Indiana Reports 4,348 40 

On account of Interest University Bonds 4,085 10 

On account of State Agency and Expenses •.... 8,850 20 

On account of Interest on State Debt 318,027 74 

On account of Treasury Fund 10 30 

On account of Michigan Road Lands 49 04 

On aeconnt of Treasury ISTotes Redeemed 2,720 75 

On account of Governor's Circle 665 00 

On account of Wabash and Erie Canal 318,047 i!7 

Balance 650,653 4.S 

Total ...... |;2,399,410 1 7 

AQITILLA J0:N'ES, 

Treasurer of State. 



Doc. No. 3.] [Part I. 

ANNUAL REP OUT 



OP THE 



AUDITOR OF STATE 



OP THE 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



SHOWING THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE TREASURY 
DEPARTMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1857. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE PRINTER, 
1857. 

I D. J.— 9 



REPORT. 



OFFICE OF AUDITOE- OF STATE, | 

Indianapolis, Nov. 2, 1857. j 

To His Excellency, Ashbel P. "Willard, 

Governor of Indiana: 

Sir: — Under an act approved February 3, 1853, to provide for 
annual ^reports of State officers and others to be made to the 
Governor, I have the honor to submit the following report, 
showing the receipts and expenditures of the Treasury Depart- 
ment, for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1857, together with 
the condition of the finances of the State, and an exhibit of 
the " revenues, taxables, funds, resources, incomes and property 
of the State." 

For more convenient reference the matters treated of are 
classified as follows : 

I. A general statement of the Puhlic Accounts: showing the re- 
ceipts into the Treas'irij from all sources, the ordinary and extraordi- 
nary expenditures of the State Government, the operations of the 
Swamp Land Fund, School Fund and other Trust Funds received 
and disbursed through the State Treasury, the condition of the Pub- 
lic Debt and the receipts and expenditures of the Wabash and Erie 
Canal. 

II. Free Banking operations, 

III. Appendix. 



112 



A GENERAL STATEMENT of the Receipts and Expendi- 
tures during the fiscal year commencing November 1, 1856, and end- 
ing October 31, 1857. 

RECEIPTS. 



There was remaining; in the Treasury 
November 1, 1856 

During the year ending October 31, 
1857, the following amounts were 
received, viz : 

REVENUE. 



$624,735 03 



On account of revenue of 1856 $553,911 06 

On account of delinquent revenue of 

1855 52,110 27 

On account of revenue of 1855 10,061 54 

On account of delinquent revenue of 

1854 1,068 39 

On account of delinquent revenue of 

1856 37,280 07 



654,431 33 



TOWNSHIP LIBRARY FUND. 



On account of library tax of 1855.... 
On account of delinquent library tax 



of 185.' 



On account of delinquent library tax 
of 1853 



$2,672 47 


8,561 


11 


43 


27 



11,276 85 



STATE DEBT SINKING FUND. 

On account of taxes of 1856 $49,211 64 

On account of taxes of 1855 1,578 56 

On account of delinquent tax of 1856 3,115 92 

On account of delinquent tax of 1855 4,698 32 

On account of delinquent tax of 1854 85 42 

On account of Sinking Fund 8,652 92 



67,342 78 



113 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

On account of tax of 1856 |295,578 99 

On account of tax of 1855 8,326 92 

On account of tax. of 1854 7,428 22 

On account of delinquent tax of 1856 21,853 43 

On account of delinquent tax of 1855 28,612 96 

On account of delinquent tax of 1854 437 12 

On account of delinquent tax of 1853 154 19 
On account of interest collected by 

county treasurers 53,729 01 



$416,120 84 

SWAMP LANDS. 

On account of sales of swamp lands 362,101 57 

BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

'On account of Asylum for the Blind |3,627 58 
On account of Hospital for the Insane 4,409 67 
On account of Deaf and Dumb Asy- 
lum "... i2,304 77 



10,342 02 



GONGRESSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 

On account of principal $403 30 

On account of interest 19 75 



423 05 



UNIVERSITY FUND. 



On account of principal $3,223 00 

On account of interest 5,347 43 

On account of costs of advertising.... 4 00 



SALINE fVSB. 

On account of Principal $4,510 36 

On account of Interest 567 93 

On account of Sales of Lands 1,487 47 



8,574 43 



$6,565 76 



114 

BANK TAX FUND. 

On account of Principal $3,527 45 

On account of Interest 139 34 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

On account of Governor's House $11 00 

On account of Military Fund 2,145 00 

On account of Colonization 25 00 

On account of Governor's Circle . 665 00 

On account of Michigan Road Lands 63 50 
On account of Sales of Revised Stat- 
utes 278 50 

On account of Estates without Heirs 260 35 

On account of General Fund 1,010 39 



WABASH AND ERIE CANAL. 

On account of Tolls & Water Rents $67,767 95 
On account of Lands East and West 

of Tippecanoe 19,814 76 

On account of Lands in Vincennes 

District 108,111 42 

On account of Interest on Deposites 1,672 23 

Miscellaneous 100 00 



$3,666 79 



SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

On account of Interest 77 00 

STATE PRISON, 

On account of Current Receipts $30,827 62 

On account of Old State Prison 1,000 00 



31,827 62 



4,458 74 



197,466 36 



Total Receipts from November 1, 
1856, to October 31, 1857, includ- 
ing balance on hand November 
Ist, 1856 $2,399,410 17 



115 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



The disbursements during tlie fiscal year ending October Sletj 
1857, were as follows, viz : 



ORDINARY EXPENDITURES. 

On account of Legislative Expenses $51,970 54 
On account of Supreme and Circuit 

Judges 19,260 60 

On account of Executive Officers.... 5,413 20 
On account of Public Printing and 

Binding 18,408 51 

On account of Fuel and Stationery.. 7,615 47 

On account of State Prison 50,991 24 

On account of Governor's House 2,045 51 

On account of State House , 2,915 31 

On account of Prosecuting Attornies 3,770 07 

On account of State Library 1,251 03 

On account of Militia 327 41 

On account of Governor's Circle 665 00 

On account of SpecWic Appropria- 
tions 19,210 66 

On account of Contingent Fund 2,883 17 



$186,227 72 



REVENUE. 



On account of Revenue of 1856 re- 
funded $2,898 38 

On account of Delinquent Revenue 
of 1856, and previous years, re- 
funded , 2,262 59 



$5,160 97 



TOWNSHIP LIBRARY FUND. 



On account of Expenses of Libraries $23,750 08 
On account of Tax refunded 100 65 



$23,850 73 



STATE DEBT SINKING FUND. 

On account of Tax of 1855 refunded $70 72 



116 



COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 



On account of Distribution of Fund. $378,056 50 
On account of Expenses of Fund. ... 2,880 04 

On account of Tax of 1855 refunded 292 36 



$381,228 90 



SWAMP LANDS. 

On account of Drainage, &c 

BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

On account of Blind Asylum $19,954 51 

On account of Deaf & Dumb Asylum 16,132 02 
On account of Hospital for Insane... 26,778 46 

TREASURY FUND. 

On account of Expense of Fund « 

CONGRESSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 

On account of Expense of Fund $4 00 

On account of Interest Distributecl... 53 46 

UNIVERSITY FUND. 

On account of Professors' Salaries... $4,564 83 

On account of Loans 4,850 00 

On account of Damages refunded.... 12 50 

On account of Interest refunded 21 00 

On account of expense of Fund 219 24 

SALINE FUND. 

On account of Expense of Fund 

BANK TAX FUND. 

On account of Expense of Fund 



407,872 21 



62,864 99 



10 3« 



57 46 



9,667 57 



124 51 



68 26 



117 

SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

On account of Expense of Fund • $25 74 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

On account of Colonization of Free 

Blacks $566 00 

On account of Presidential Election. 954 07 

On account of Michigan Road Lands 49 04 

On account of Free Banking 3,327 00 

On account of Interest on University 

Bonds 4,085 10 

On account of Distribution of Laws 990 23 

On account of Miscellaneous Items . 3,823 55 
On account of Expenses of Supreme 

Court 2,476 80 

On account of Indiana Reports 4,348 40 



TREASURY NOTES. 

On account of six per cents redeemed $1,330 00 

On account of Interest on same 950 33 

On account of live per cents redeemed 250 00 

On account of Interest on same 128 98 

On account of quarter per cents re- 
deemed... 60 00 

On account of Interest on same 1 44 



PUBLIC DEBT. 



On account of Interest & Exchange $3,260 00 

On account of Interest on State Debt 318,027 74 

On account of Salary of Agent 5,000 00 

On account of Expenses of Agency . 3,850 20 



20,620 19 



2,720 76 



330,137 94 



WABASH AND ERIE CANAL, 



General Expenses of Canal $17,513 71 

Ordinary Repairs 69,919 66 

Extraordinary Repairs 18,870 89 

Rebuilding Bridges 1,241 61 

Superintendence 11,402 12 



118 

Collection $8,075 81 

Coustrnction, Terre Haute to Point 

Commerce • 4,136 26 

Damages and Water Power 4,668 85 

Engineering 3,150 39 

Expense of Land Office East and 

West Tippecanoe 430 99 

Expense of Land Office Vincennes 

District 1,140 04 

Installments on advance by bond- 
holders 81,220 00 

Interest on W. & E. Canal Stocks.... 56,095 14 

Interest on advance by Bondholders. 40,182 20 

$318,047 67 

Whole amount audited from Nov. 1, 1856, to Oct. 
31, 1857 $1,748,756 69 



STATE OF THE TREASURY. 

Balance in the Treasury Kovember 1, 1856 $624,735 03 

Receipts into the Treasury from all sources during 

the year ending October 31, 1857 1,774,675 14 

Total $2,399,410 17 

Amount of warrants drawn on the Treasury on all 
accounts during the year ending Oct. 31, 1857... 1,748,756 69 

Balance in the Treasury October 31, 1857 $650,653 48 



A STATEMENT of the Receipts and Expenditures on accouni of 
the various Trust Funds. 



UNIVERSITY FUND. 

V Receipts. ' , 

Balance on hand November 1, 1856 $2,333 72 

Loans refunded during the year 3,223 00 

Interest on loans 5,347 43 

Costs of advertising 4 00 

$10,908 16 



119 



Disbursements. 

Principal loaned during the year $4,850 00 

Professors' salaries 4,564 83 

Damages refunded 12 50 

Interest refunded 21 00 

Expense of fund 219 24 

$9,667 57 

Balance on hand November 1, 1857 $1,240 58 



LOAN ACCOUNT. 

Amount outstanding on loan November 1, 1856... $77,746 57 

Loans refunded during the j'ear 3,223 00 

$74,523 57 

New loans made during the 3'ear 4,850 00 

Making loans outstanding $79,373 57 

SALINE FUND, 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1856 $10,749 52 

Principal received during the year 5,997 83 

Interest in loans 567 93 

$17,315 28 

Expenditures. 

Expense of fund $124 51 

Balance on hand Nov. 1, 1857 17,190 77 

$17,316 28 

.^r. (|i;:''.'i ■ 

LOAN ACCOUNT. 

Amount outstanding on loan November 1, 1856,... $9,689 22 

, Loans refunded during the year 571 00 

Total outstanding on loan November 1, 1857,. $9,118 22 



120 

The sum of $3,939 ZQ of principal of Saline Fund included in 
the foregoing statement, and the sum of $683 64 of principal of 
Bank Tax Fund embraced in receipts upon account of that 
Fund were paid in by the Branch Bank at Evansville, as divi- 
dends of the capital stock of that Branch standing in the name 
of the State on account of those funds. The original investment 
appears to have been made by an order of the Board of Com- 
missioners of the Sinking Fund at their November session, 1841, 
-under an act approved Frebruary 15, 1841, authorizing the in- 
vestment of the various Trust Funds in the Bank Stock of the 
different Branches of the State Bank. The amounts so sub- 
Bcribed were as follows : 

On account of Saline Fund $4,924 20 

On account of Bank Tax Fund , 7 92 07 

BANK TAX FUND. 

Meceipts, 

Amount on hand November 1, 1856 $10,607 83 

Amount from banks under 15th section of Charter 2,527 15 
Amount from stocks of the branch bank Evans- 
ville 633 64 

Loans refunded 366 66 

Interest on loans 139 34 



Expense of fund 



The whole amount of this fund received under the 15th sec- 
tion of the Charter of the State Bank of Indiana, up to Oct. 

31, 1856, was $61,484 66 

The receipts for the year ending October 31, 1857, 

were as follows, viz : 

From Tcrre Haute Branch Bank $381 75 

From Evansville Branch Bank 183 88 

From Vincennes Branch Bank 147 12 

From Lawrenceburgh Branch Bank. 246 87 

From Richmond Branch Bank 27187 

Prom Bedford Branch Bank 129 41 

From New Albany Branch Bank 217 75 

From Michigan City Branch Bank.. 157 50 







$14,274 62^ 


Expenditures. 






I'October 31, 1857.... 


$68 26 
14,206 36 


$14,274 62 







121 

From Lafayette Branch Bank $269 38 

From South Bend Branch Bank 400 00 

From Fort Wayne Branch Bank 121 62 

. 2,527 15 

Total receipts of fund $64,011 80 

Under the act of 184o the following amounts were distrihuted: 

Amount apportioned for 1845 $1,749 89 

Amount apportioned for 1846 22,344 43 

Amount apportioned for 1847 4,071 04 

Amount apportioned for 1848 5,818 58 

Amount apportioned for 1849 3,815 15 

Amount apportioned for 1850 2,876 06 

Amount apportioned for 1851 2,251 02 

Amount apportioned for 1852 4,602 63 

Amount apportioned for 1853 4,174 00 



* '■ $51,702 80 

Since 1853 no general distribution has been made. The 
counties of Benton, Howard, Jasper, Pulaski, Starke, Tipton 
and Whitley having received no portion of the Surplus Revenue 
Fund, the balance of both the Band Tax Fund and Saline Fund 
remaining on hand in 1854, was distributed to them in lieu 
thereof. 

LOAN ACCOUNT. 

Amount outstanding on loan November 1, 1856 ... $6,626 85 
Loans refunded during the year 366 66 

Outstanding on loan November 1, 1857 $6,260 19 

COUNTY SEMINARY FUND DERIVED FROM MILITIA 

FINES. 

Amount on hand October 31, 1857 $445 00 

SURPLUS REVENUE FUND. 

Heeeipts. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1856 $1,599 83 

Interest on loans received during the year 77 00 

. . $1,676 83 



122 

Expenditures. 

Expense of Fund $25 74 

Balance on hand November 1, 1857... 1,651 09 



$1,676 83 



LOAN ACCOUNT. 

Ajnount of loans outstanding $2,27-4 65 

This fund belongs to the counties Dekalb, Lake and "Wells, 
they having failed to receive their portion at the time the distri- 
bution was made. Tlie amount belonging to these counties 
originally was $6,376 80, which was loaned by the Treasurer. It 
has been reduced by pa^^ments to the counties of principal and 
interest as they have been collected. The balance on hand shows 
that there is now due to each one of the counties the sum of 
$550 36. This is made up of principal refunded and accruing 
interest on loans outstanding. 

CONGRESSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND. 

Recei]jts, 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $194 85 

Loans refunded during the year 403 30 

Interest on loans 19 75 



$617 90 



Expe7iditures. 

Expense of fund $4 00 

Distributed to Greene county 17 50 

Distributed to Eipley county 35 96 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857.... 560 44 

$617 90 

This fund belongs to township No. 10 of range No. 13 in Rip- 
ley county and township No. 6 of range No. 5 in Greene county. 

THREE PER CENT FUND. 
Balance in the Treasury October 31, 1857 $32 13 



123 

This balance belongs to the counties of Huntington, Steuben, 
Vanderburg and Whitley, No advance has been made toward 
a settlement with the General Government on account of this 
fund. 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND DERIVED EROM SINKING 

FUND. . , , , 

Balance on hand October 31, 1853 $780,886 66 

Since the above date nothing has been received. The entire 
amount of the balance reported on hand, except the sum of 
$27,061 51, was paid in Bank Script, and accrued interest there- 
on, issued by the State under the act of 1842, This fund is a 
debt which the State owes to the Common School Fund, and 
bears interest at the rate of six per cent. 

INDIANAPOLIS FUND. 

■ 1 ■ ; 
Amount outstanding on loan $483 30 

No receipts or disbursements on account of this fund during 
the year. 

TREASURY FUND. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $5,042 40 

No receipts on account of this fund during the year. 

... ■: . - .■ ': :.,. ,. .. !■ P" -i 

Expenditures. 

Expense of fund 10 36 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $5,032 04 

FUND FROM ESTATES "WITHOUT HEIRS. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $4,172 55 

Received during the year 260 35 

Amount an hand October 31, 1857 $4,432 90 



124 

A STATE3IENT of the Beceijpts and Expenditures on account 
f/ tht Benevolent Institutions. 

INSTITUTE FOE, EBUCATmG THE BLIND. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 P,340 14 

Receipts during the year 3,627 58 

$6,967 72 

Disbursements. 

Expended during the year $19,954 51 

Amount overdrawn October 31, 1857 $12,986 79 

ASYLUM FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $4,679 51 

Receipts during the year 2,304 77 

$6,984 28 

Disbursements. 
Expended during the year $16,132 02 



Amount overdrawn October 31, 1857 $9,147 74 

HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $17,694 97 

Receipts during the year 4,409 67 

$22,104 64 

Disbursements. 

Expended during the year $26,778 46 

Amount overdrawn October 31, 1857 $4,673 82 



125 

THE STATE rPviso:^". 

Expended during the year $50,991 24 

deceived during the year 30,827 62 

Excess of expenditures $20,1G3 62 

Add amount of former appropriation overdrawn 

on the olstof October, 1856 46,098 86 

Amount overdrawn October 31, 1857 $66,262 48 

To explain the rather formidable excess of the expenditures 
over the recei[)ts during the year, under the operation of the 
new prison law, it is necessary to state that the mileage of Sher- 
iffs for taking convicts to the prison and other claims to a large 
amount have been charged to the State Prison account and con- 
tribute largely to make up this excess. 

The following statement will more clearly demonstrate the 
operation of the new law for the government of the Prison: 

Total expenditures during the year $50,991 24 

Amount paid Sheriffs for mileage $6,570 90 

Amount paid S. II. Patterson on pur- 
chase of old State Prison, &c 8,280 97 ■ ' 

Amount paid Leroy Woods salary 

as Chaplain 1,130 47 

15,982 34 



Leaves actual expenditures of Prison $35,008 90 

Receipts during the year as above 30,827 63 



Making excess of expenditures over receipts of $4,181 28 

on account of State Prison proper, which amount is covered 
by the salaries of the Directors, Warden and other officers of 
the Prison whose accounts are by law audited quarterly at thia 
office. It will be seen, therefore, that, with the exception of -»">'i 
the salaries of the higher officers whose pay is established by 
law, and payable out of the State Treasury, the current receipts 
of the prison for the year balance the expenditures. In the 
abov^e statement on account is taken of labor of convicts ex- 
pended by order of the Directors in building new cells for the 
prison, and expenditures for other improvements of a permanent 
nature, all of which will probably be shown in the report of the 
Directors-. 

1 D. J.^10. 



126 



CO^klMON SCHOOL FUXD DERIVED FROM CURRENT 
TAXES AND INTEREST UPON TRUST FUNDS. 

OPERATIONS DURING THE YEAR 1857. 

Receipts. 

On account of delinquent tax of 1855 and previous 

yeai-s $29,204 27 

On account of tax of 1855 8,326 92 

On account of tax of 1854 7,428 22 

On account of tax of 1856 295,578 99 

On account of delinquent tax of 1856 21,853 43 

On account of interest collected by county treas- 
urers 53,729 01 

$416,120 84 

Disbursements. 

■ Expense of fund $2,880 04 

Taxes refunded 292 36 

Distributed to counties 378,056 50 

381,228 90 

Excess of receipts over disbursements $34,891 94 

Add balance due the School Fund Oct. 31, 1856, 
as shown by the last annual report from this 
office 92,881 88 

Makes total due from the State $127,773 82 

SWAMP LAND FUND. 

Receipts. 

balance on hand October 31, 1856 $228,965 44 

Receipts during the year 362,101 57 

$591,067 01 
Disbursements. 

Expended during the year 407,872 21 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $183,194 80 



127 

It will be pereeived that the balance due from the State to the 
counties has been reduced in the sum of $45,770 61 during the 
last fiscal year. But for the failure of the Legislature to i)ass a 
law for the collection of revenue the entire demand upon this 
fund could have been promptly met and paid at the Treasury. 
As it is, a prudent administration of the aftairs of the State haa 
demanded the utmost economy in disbursing the fund, and the 
limiting of contracts for ditching to the smallest amount com- 
patible with the intents of the counties to which the fund be- 
longs. A suggestion to this eifect having been made to the 
Swamp Land Commissioners of the various counties to which 
balances were due, they, with one or two exceptions, readily ap- 
preciated the embarrassing situation in which the officers of Stato 
controlling the Treasury Department were placed, saw at once 
the impossibility of meeting the entire debt of the State to the 
Fund at a time when no means were provided by law to re- 
plenish the Treasury, and, by postponing contemplated ditching 
operations, in many instances of great importance to the localities 
immediately interested, and exercising a strict economy in the 
prosecution of works already commenced and indispensibly 
necessary, they contributed materially to lessen difficulties, 
which, if actuated by a less liberal spirit, they might have ag- 
gravated. Their course in this respect cannot be too highly 
commended. 

Doubtless great disappointment has resulted in some instances 
from the iiuibility of the State to furnish means at the present 
time for the purposes to which this fund is devoted under the 
general Swamp Land act of 1852. Where ditches have been 
surveyed, contracts entered into, laborers employed and opera- 
tions commenced, an entire suspension for want of means to con- 
tinue the work has fallen heavily upon contractors, and wrought 
a hardship upon the laboring classes, many of whom in some of 
the larger Swamp Land counties are employed in draining these 
lands. This is but one among the many evils resulting from the 
failure of the Legislature to pass a revenue act. 

The balances standing to the credit of the different counties 
on account of this fund should be considered by the State in the 
light of a preferred debt, and not only protected from the as- 
saults of rapacious speculators but sacredly held and applied, so 
far as may be necessary, to the purposes contemplated by the 
act of May 29, 1852, and the act of Congress of September 28, 
1850, making the donation. For this, the good faith of the 
State is pledged both to the General Government and to those 
counties, and no doubt need be entertained that h^r pledge will 
be fully redeemed to the extent of the moneys paid into her 
Treasury. 

With this assurance, it is very doubtful whether the true in- 
terests of any county would have been subserved had the fund 



128 

Hrising from the sales been rotaiued in the county Treasury. 
From one or two unfortunate examples of this policy (the only 
ones of the kind) a diliereut inference might be drawn. 

Lender an act approved March 5, 1857, a distribution lias l)een 
made of the proceeds arising from sales under the act of Febru- 
ary 14, ISol, authorizing the Registers and Receivers of tho 
General Land Otiice for the different districts to act as agents 
for the State in the sale of Swamp Lands, and the amounts 
found to be due carried to the credit of the respective counties 
upon the books of this office. 

The apportionment thus made, giving to each county the pro- 
ceeds of the lands lying within its borders, is as follows: 

To the county of Laporte $4,349 45 

To the county of Jasper 1,668 90 

To the county of Starke 7^2 94 

To the county of Bentt)n 648 59 

To the county of White 4,448 06 

To the county of Pulaski 4,488 46 

To the county of Lake 5,59o 15 

To the county of Porter 3,210 46 

To the county oT Kosciusko , 1,510 59 

To the county of Howard 2,609 29 

To the county of Boone 899 31 

To the county of Madison 4,574 54 

To the county of Cass 539 35 

To the county of Miami 120 00 

To the county of Elkhart 200 00 

To the coimty of Jay 50 00 

To the county of St. Joseph 1,683 40 

To the county of Marshall 2,872 16 

To the county of Fulton 1,170 25 

To the county of Tipton 7,733 63 

To the county of Grant 2,503 62 

To the county of Montgomery 50 00 

To the county of Clinton 50 00 

To tlic county of Monroe 642 27 

To the county of Jackson 4,164 21 

To the county of Bariholomew 506 72 

To the county of Washington... 132 06 

To the county of Brown 978 60 

To the county of Jennings 110 23 

To the county of Morgan 218 44 

To the county of Johnson 142 87 

To thj county of Ripley 1,050 00 

To the county of Decatur 100 00 

To the county of Whitley 100 00 

Total amount api utioned $59,836 55 



129 

A detailed cxhil»it of the aeeounts of tlic several conntiea 
with this distribution included will be found by reference to 
Btatenicnt No. 5 of the ajjpendix. 

Under the provisions of the law of jS'Iarch 5, 1857, authorizing 
ditching contracts to be paid in Swamp Lands, most of the re- 
maining lands have been exempted from sale by lists filed in the 
several counties, for old contracts contirmed, or new ones made 
with the commissioners, while nearly all the patents which Avere 
fraudulently issued in 1856, for certilicates of work not done, 
liavc been returned and cancelled. In some cases where the hiw 
was not understood or misconstrued by the county officers, gene- 
ral contracts were made for the sale of all the land in a county, 
to be paid for in ditching. To remedy this, and to prevent the 
land being sold without an equivalent in work or in cash, the 
following circular was issued: 

Office of Auditor of State, Indiana, 1 
IndianapoHs, June 23, 1857. / 

From information received at this office, it appears that the 
act of !March 5, 1857, amending the 25th section of the swamp 
land law of 1852, is in many instances misunderstood by county 
officers and swamp land commissioners, rendering necessary the 
following explicit directions and instructions : 

First — The amended act does not authorize a general and 
indefinite contract, upon which the Auditor is authorized to 
withdraw from sale all the swamp lands in a county, l)ut each 
contract mi'S*: be for certain and specified work; iji advertising 
and letting which the commissioner Avill be governed by sections 
23 and 24 of the swamp land law of 1852, and upon which the 
Auditor is authorized to withdraw from sale an amount of land 
equal to the estimated cost of the work, and no more. Sections 
23 and 24 of the law of 1852 are in no way affected by th& 
amendment of 1855, but remain in full force. 

Secondly — Lands not patented to the State cannot be held for 
ditching contracts, by filing lists with the County Auditor, a^ 
they will be advertised and offered at public sale in the several 
counties, as soon as patents are received from the General Gov- 
ernment. 

Thirdly — It is charged by citizens of several counties where 
there are swam}) lands, that men obtain contracts for ditching, 
upon which they Avithdraw large amounts of lands from sale — . 
that they sell the best of the land at an advanced price, paying 
for the same at the minimum price, put the profits in their pocket 
and leave the Avork undone. It is earnestly recommended to the 
CJnimissioners that each contract contain a jirovision rendeiing 
it void unless the work is commenced within a reasonable or 
epecified time, and prosecuted to comjtletion. 

JOII^ A7. DODD, 

Auditor of Stait. 



130 

The law of March 5, 1857, provides that the contractor may 
t\'itlidraw from sale^ by filing a list with the county auditor, an 
amount of land equal to the estimated cost of his work, for 
which he shall receive patents as the work progresses ; or he may 
pay the money into the county treasury for the entire amount of 
the land filed, receive his patents, and draw the money back 
upon estimates of work done. Under this provision of the law, 
most of the lands have been patented upon certificates of the 
county treasurer that the contractor has paid the money. In the 
county of Jasper, all the lands remaining unsold at the passage 
of the law of March last, were taken by ditching contracts and 
lists filed with the proper ofiEicer; most of which have since 
been patented, upon certificates of the county treasurer that the 
contractor has paid the money for the same into the county 
treasury. 

Tlin-i it will be seen the responsilnlity for a faithful application 
of the swamp lands, as contemplated in the act of March 5, 1857, 
rests with the county ofiicers alone, and that their action is be- 
yo id the control of the ofiicers of State. 

STATE DEBT. 

The nature and classification of the foreign debt of the State 
liave been so often explained in the reports from this otfice, that 
a reiteration is deemed unnecessary. The following statement of 
its present condition is furnished by the Agent of State: 

Bonds Surrendered. 

There was outstanding on the 1st day of November, 

1856, 425 bonds of $1,000 each, $425,000 00 

There has been surrendered since that time 11 bonds 

of $1,000 each, 11,000 00 

$414,000 00 

Floe per cent. State Stock. 

There had been issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to the 1st of Novenibor,185G, $5,306,500 00 

There has been issued since that time on same ac- 
count, 5,500 00 



Making total issued on November 1, 1857,. ..$5,312,000 00 
Tioo and a-haJf per ccid. State Stock. 

There had been issued <m account of bonds surren- 
dered up to 1st November, 1856, $2,040,811 00 

There has been issued since tliat time on same ac- 
count, 4,262 50 

Making total issued on 1st November, 1857,. ..$2,045,073 50 



131 

Five per cent. Preferred Canal Stock. 

There is outstanding of this stock same as reported 

kst year, $4,079,500 00 

Five per cent. Preferred Special Canal Stock. 

There is outstanding of this stock, same as reported 

last year, $1,216,737 50 

Five per cent. Deferred Canal Stock. 

There had been issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to 1st November, 1856, $1,227,000 00 

There has been issued since that time on same ac- 
count, 5,500 00 

Making total issued on K'ovember 1, 1857,... $1,232,500 00 

Five per cent. Deferred Special Canal Stock. 

There had been issued on account of bonds surren- 
dered up to November 1, ]856, $465,582 50 

There has been issued since that time on same ac- 
count, 4,262 50 

Making total issued on November 1, 1857, $469,845 00 

INTEREST ON STATE DEBT. 

The following statement shows the amounts of interest paid 
each year, since the consummation of the arrangement ^^'ith the 
bondholders : 

In the year 1847, $ 78,600 00 

In the year 1848, 183,730 00 

In the year 1849, 188,344 00 

In the year 1850, 188,595 00 

In the year 1851, 203,718 00 

In the year 18.52, 199,784 00 

In the year 1853, 249,127 76 

In the year 1854, 298,255 52 

In the year 1855, 306,569 14 

In the year 1856, 316,674 34 

In the year 1857, 318,027 74 

$2,531,425 49 



132 

INTEREST AND EXCHANGE. 

Audited for 1854, |3,756 50 

Audited for 1855, 5,050 00 

Audited for 1856, 3,260 00 

Audited for 1857, 3,260 00 



^15,326 50 

SALARY OF AGENT. 

Amount aiulited for saliirv of Agent for the years 

1856 and 1857, ." $5,000 00 

EXPENSES OF AGENCY. 

Aiiiount audited for incidental expenses of Agency 

for the year ending October 31, 1857, .". $3,850 20 

The amount of State stock redeemed up to November 1, 1856, 
ia as follows: ,; . , 

Of live per cents, $150,000 

Of two and a-half per ceuts, 228,234 

' '■■■■'-'■'■■'= $378,234 

Since that time purchase has been made by tlie Agent, under 
direction of the Board, of two and a-half per cents amounting to 
$13,576 00, ])ut at the date of this report no formal account had 
been rendered, and consequently the expenditure is not showu 
iu the statement of disbursements for the year just ended. 

VINCENNES UNIVERSITY BONDS. 

Under an act approved February 13, 1855, to adjust the Gib- 
8on Seminary Township claim, and to provide for the payment 
of a judgment against the State obtained by the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Vincunnes University, bonds to the amount of 
^66,585 00, bearing six per cent, interest, were issued under dato 
of February 22, 1855. 

This case had been in litigation for a number of years. Tho 
Trustees of the Vincennes University claimed ownership of a 
to\vnslii[) of laud iu (jrib.sou county, donated to the State by tho 
General Government, for the purpose of founding a State semin- 
ary of learning. They gained the suit, but the lauds had all been 
Bold, and the proceeds paid into the Stute treasury, forming what 
18 known as the University Fund, the interest of which is devoted 
to the payment of salaries of the President and J'rofessors of tho 
Lidiana Univer.iity, at liloomington, while the principal is 



133 

required by the Constitntlon to be preserved inviolate. Hence 
the necessity which demanded the issue of tliese bonds, tind 
their acceptance by the Trustees may be regarded as a linal ad- 
justment of the matter. 

The bonds have interest coupons attached, payable semi- 
annually at the State treasur\'. The priiicii)al is [)ayable at the 
pleasure of the State, after thirty years from the date of issue. 

The amounts of interest which have been paid up to the pres- 
ent date, are as follows : 

For the year 1855, $1,067 55 

For the year 1856, 8,985 10 

For the year 1857, 4,085 10 



§9,987 75 

DOMESTIC DEBT OF THE STATE. 

Six 2^er cent. Treasury Notes. 

Total amount issued, ,$1,500,000 00 

Total amount redeemed to October 

31, 1856, $1,512,415 00 

Total amount redeemed since, 1,380 00 

1,513,745 00 



Excess of redemption, $13,745 00 

Fire per cent. Treasury Notes. 

Total amount issued, $722,640 00 

Total amount redeemed to October 

31, 1856, $735,545 00 

Total redeemed since, 250 00 

735,795 00 



Excess of redemption, $18,155 00 

Quarter per cent. Treasury Notes. 

Total amount issued, $70,000 00 

Total amount redeemed to October 

31, 1856, $76,995 00 

Total amount redeemed since, 60 00 

77,055 00 



Excess of redemption, 7,055 00 



134 

Interest Account. 

Amount of interest paid on six per 

cent, up to October 31,1856 $337,523 54 

Amount of interest since paid 1,000 33 

$338,523 87 

Amount of interest paid on five per 

cents, up to October 31, 1856 $163,064 45 

Amount of interest since paid 128 98 

163,193 43 . 

Amount of interest paid on qnarter 

per cents, up to October 31, 1856... $657 92 

Amount of interest since paid 1 44 

659 36 

Total $502^76^66 

. — -J,. 

WABASH AND ERIE CANAL. 

Balance remaininof in hands of Trustees Oct. 1, 

1856 .^ $286,803 12 

Receipts by Trustees for the year ending Septem- 
ber 30, 1857 ". 197,466 36 

$484,269 48 

Expenditures by Trustees for the year ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1857 318,047 67 

Balance on hand October 1, 1857 $166,221 81 

The grand total of receipts and expenditures on account of 
"Wabash and Erie Canal from its commencement up to October 
1, 1857, is as follows: 

Receipts. 

Total by State to surrcndf!r to Trnstecs $1,701,459 44 

Total by Trustees to October 1, 1847 302,856 73 

Total by Trustees ibr year ending Otttober 1, 1848 385,606 95 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1849 396,836 92 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1850 521,972 30 

Total bv Trustees for year ending October 1, 1851 365,761 43 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1852 460,452 04 

Total 1)V Trustees for year ending Oct(,l,er 1, 1853 657,399 77 

Total by Trustees for year endin'ii: October 1, 1854 520,681 10 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1855 252,076 62 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1856 238,892 25 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1857 197,466 36 

Total receipts from all sources to Oct. 1, 1857. ..$6,001,461 91 



135 

Expenditures. 

Total bv State to surrender to Trustees ^5,321,505 82 

Total b V Trustees to October 1 , 1 847 7,420 77 

Total by Trustees for year ending; October 1, 1848 854,311 62 

Total by Trustees for year endin«^ October 1, 1849 531,617 29 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1850 519,013 13 

Total b'v Trustees for year ending October 1, 1851 414,273 27 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1852 415,611 30 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1853 625,044 19 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1854 325,724 48 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1855 422,192 07 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1856 200,524 87 

Total by Trustees for year ending October 1, 1857 318,047 67 

Total cost to October 1, 1857 $9,455,346 48 

Total receipts brought down $6,001,461 91 

Deduct bondholders subscription to be refunded 

out of reyenues of the Canal 572,210 03 

Total net receipts 5,429,251 88 

Total net expenditures 9,455,346 48 

Grand total of expenses oyer receipts $4,026,094 60 

Total expenditures by Trustees to Oct. 1, 1857 $4,133,780 QQ 

Total receipts by Trustees to October 1, 1857, ex- 

clusiye of bondholder^ subscription 3,727,792 44 

Excess of expenditures oyer receipts $405,988 22 

t . . . GENERAL REMARKS. 

The balance in the Treasur}^ on the 31st of October 

1857, iis heretofore stated, is $650,653 48 

Deduct balance due Wabash and Ede canal which 

is merely nominal '. 166,221 81 



$484,431 67 



There is due: 

To the Swamp Land Fund, $183,194 80 

To the Common School Fund 127,773 82 

To the Townsliip Library Fund, 1,690 38 

To the yarious Trust Funds about... 35,294 24 

To the State Debt Sinking Fund,... 59,724 07 



407,677 31 
$76,754 36 



136 

Statement TTo. 1 in the Appendix exhibits in detail the April 
scttlenionts with the county treasurers, on account of State, 
school, sinking fund, and library taxes, showing the amount paid 
and the amount delinquent on each account. The settlenicnta 
have been promptly made, except in the case of the Treasurer of 
Jasper county, whose account has been placed in the hands of 
the Attorney General for collection. The whole amount of 
revenue received during the year is as follows : 

On account of revenue of 1856, §553,911 06 

On account of revenue of 1855, 10,061 54 

On account of delinquent revenue of 1856, 37,280 07 

On account of delinquent revenue of 1855 and pre- 
vious years, 53,178 66 

Total, §654,431 33 

Statement J^o. 2 shows an abstract of the August settlements 
with county treasurers on account of delinquent taxes of 1856. 
It will be observed that several treasurers have failed to make 
this settlement, as required by law. 

Statement No. 3 gives the number of acres of taxable land, 
and shows the valuation of the entire real and personal property 
in the State, as appraised for the purpose of taxation, with the 
number of polls returned for the same purpose for the year 1857. 
No returns having been received from the counties of Clinton, 
Grant, Lagrange, Lake, Monroe, Ohio, Tippecanoe, and Wari*ick, 
the reports for last year are inserted in order to complete the 
table. The following comparisons of this statement with that of 
last year may be made : 

Value of all taxables for 1857, $317,932,958- 

Value of all taxables for 1856, 306,797,819 

Licreasc, $11,135,139 

Number of acres, 1857, 21,510,601 

Number of acres, 1856, '. 20,868,370 

Increase, 642,231 

Number of polls 1857, 185,193 

Number of polls, 1856, 174,802 

Increase, 10,391 

Statement No. 4 will sliow the amount of taxes levied upon 
the duplicate.'i of the scvei'al counties, for school, sinking fund, 
and county purposes, for the year 1857. From several counties 



137 

no returns have been received, a]tlion<;:li tlie publication of this 
report lias ])eeii delayeJ tor several weei^s, in order to give county 
auditors ample time to furnish this office infonnation necessary 
to a satisfactory report upon this and other siihjcets. 

Statement Ko. 5 exhibits the condition of the swamp land ac- 
counts of the several counties in which these lands are situated. 
Under sccticm 50 of the swamp land act of 1852, and in order 
that the interest of the State may be protected, a charge has 
been entered against the swamp land fund of each county, in 
amount equal to ten per cent, of the gross receipts from sales of 
land within its limits, for the purpose of re-imbursing the State 
for moneys paid out of her treasury on account of general ex- 
penses of tlie fund. 

Statement No. 6 will show the. amount of tax and interest of 
common school fund received, the number of children, and the 
amount of the fund distributed to eacli county. 

Statement N(\ 7 will show the agricultural products of tlie 
counties. Aside from the failure of several county auditors to 
report, the statement cannot be regarded as reliable. Of the 
returns received, many are evidently incorrect, and it is believed 
that a majority fall short of what a full and complete exhibit 
would show. 



FREE BANKING. 



The annexed tables exhibit the condition of the Free Banks 
of this State, and show the gratifying fact that there has been 
no failure among the banks which complied with the amended 
law of 1855, involving the loss of a dollar to billholders. 

The ten per cent, excess of securities over circulation, required 
by that law, has been an effectual protection from loss, even un- 
der the almost unprecedented depreciation of stocks experienced 
during the last sixty days ; so that the notes of the only bank 
under protest, which has complied with that law, (Tippecanoe,) 
will be redeemed at this office dollar for dollar, provided no more 
notes were issued than the amount of securities on deposit when 
I oame into office. 

The promptness with which the Free Banks responded to the 
call for additional securities, at a time when stocks were heavily 
depressed, and when old and long tried institutions were failing 
on every hand, shows that they are controlled by honorable and 
responsible men, and is a proof of the correctness of the princi- 
ple of banking with adequate security, that no other system has 
furnished during the late financial crisis. 

Two Free Banks (iS^orth America at Clinton and Savings 
Bank) have been wound up during the past year by this depart- 
ment, at a loss to the billholders ; but these banks had only the 
amount of securities required by the law of 1852, and had not 
complied with the law of 1855. The circulation of these banks 
was quite small, and the loss nominal. 

The failure of these banks to redeem their notes demonstrates 
the wisdom of those provisions of the law of 1855 requiring an 
excess of securities, to guard against sudden depreciation in 
stocks, and fixing a minimum of capital of fifty thousand dol- 
lars ; thus preventing the establishment of banks with a small 
circulation, by adventurers from abroad without capital. 

Had the law of 1852 contained the provisions of the law now 
in force, requiring a deposit of fifty thousand dollars worth of 
stocks, and ten per cent, above the circulation of a bank, tlie ca- 



140 

lamitics of 1854 would not have been experienced, and the banks 
now doing business wouhl not feel so heavily the discredit thrown 
upon the system l)y the faihire of the brood which sprang into 
existence under the law of 1852, The securities required by the 
law now in force, for the redemption of the issues of the Iree 
banks, are ample in any emergency likely to occur, provided tlie 
officers in charge of this Department arc faithful to the law and 
their duties. 

There is a provision in tlie free banking law requiring the 
banks to appoint an agent at Indianapolis for the redemption of 
their notes, but there is no penalty for non-compliance. Such 
banks as have given notice to wind up will be entitled at the end 
of two years fn^m the date of such notice, to their remaining 
securities, by giving bond to the Auditor for the redem[»tion of 
any notes that inay be oulstanding. These banks do not a}»point 
the agent required by \avr, but compel their notes to be presented 
at the bank for redemption. As the circulation of these banks 
becomes reduced, and can be collected only in small quantities, 
it is received at a discount, to repay the expense of sending it 
home for redemption. Thus community is shaved for the benefit 
of bankers and brokers, while the securities for the redemption 
of the notes are ample. The law requiring an agent to redeem 
at Indianapolis should contain such a penalty as would enforce 
a compliance on the part of banks winding up and redeeming 
their circulation. 

The circulation of the Free Banks doing business 

on the 81st October 1856, was, " $1,765,060 

Circulation at this date 1,359,176 

Decrease in circulation $405,884 

The market value of the securities of Free Banks 

at the i>resent date, is $1,479,434 

Circulation as given above 1,359,176 

Excess of securities over circulation $120,258 

The Bank of Gosport has been established since the date of 
the last report. Caj.ital $100,000 circulation $59,390. 

Articles of association have been tiled for the Bank of Vin- 
cennes, at Vincennes, and the Bank of Corydon at Corydon. 
Plates have been engraved for both, and the notes for the Bank 
of Vincennes have been printed and received at this office, but 
no securities have been deposited by either, nor has there been 
any notes signe*! in this Department. 

The kind an<l vahic of securities of the Free Banks will be 
found in statement "A," being estimated by the prices ruling in 
New York during tlie first week in November, 1857, and from 
which it will be seen that at tlie date of tliis report and the 



141 

close of tlic fiscal year, the excess of seciirities over circulation, 
Vv'as ovvT eight per cent., even at the extremely low price of 
stocks then prevailing. The increase in price of all sccuritiea 
up to the close of this report, gives the Free Banks considerably 
over the ten per cent, excess required by law. 

Statement "13" is a tabular exhibit of the circulation of each 
bank, as compared with the same at the date of tlie last report 
from this otHce, also the notes issued and cancelled for each 
bank and the totals of each. 

Statement "C shows the amount at their par value of each 
description of stocks lield by the Bank Department in trust 
for the several free banks. 

Statement "D" coniains the semi-annual report of the free 
banks, as shown l>y returns made to this ofHce under oath on the 
first Monday in July, 1857. 

Statement "E"' sliows the condition of the suspended banks, 
redeemed at this otHcc, with tlie rate paid for each, and is fol- 
lowed by a list of banks, the securities of wliich were given up 
by my predecessor, leaving circulation unprovided for, except as 
the owners arc responsible. 

Statement "F" gives the names of the stockholders of the 
different banlcs, and the amount hold fjy each, made from the 
last semi-annual reports of tlie banks. 

Statement "G"' sliows the total nmubor and donomimitions of 
bank note impressions prin.ted for the different b:inks, tlie num- 
ber issued and the number burned, up to January 2-3, 1857, and 
the amount fonrid on hand at that date. The number issued 
and destro3'ed by my predecessors up to January 25, 1857, when 
I took possession of the office, and the number found on haiid 
at that date, should agree with the total number printed. An 
examination \)f the table will show some discrepancies in tins 
account. The want of care and accuracy which the records ex- 
hibit in this important particulai;, has made that part of the re- 
port a work of some difficulty. The engi avers have kindl}- fur- 
nished duplicate reports of the printing in many cases, and havo 
aitbrded every facility for a correct statement of the total amount 
printed for eacli bank. In some cases where the total amount 
printed is not accounted for on the 25th January last, there is 
evidence that the notes v/ere burned: but as there is no certifi- 
cate on tile, I cannot re[)ort the paper accounted for, relyino- 
upon the memory alone of those wlio preceded me. In other 
cases there is no record or evidence to account for the discreij- 
ancy. 

Statement "II" shows the disposition that has been made of 
the blaidv impressions on hand January 25, 1857, and the num- 
ber that has been printed sirice that date. It will be seen that 
the number issued and burned and now on hand, agree wiih the 
number found at that date. Certificates of the number of blank 
1 D. J.— 11. 



142 

notes burned, duly attested by the agent of the bank are on file 
in this office. 

Statement "I" sliows the bank note plates engraved, their 
denomination, the names of the engravers and the place of de- 
posit. 

Upon assuming the duties of this office in January last, but 
few of the plates were found in possession of the Departm^mt. 
An opinion prevailed that the right of the engraver to the 
possession of the plates, was paramount to the security of the 
billholder, or the protection of the banker. 

Plates were engraved, the name changed from that of one bank 
to another and notes printed in many cases without any order 
or authority from this Department, iSTotes had already appeared 
on the Savings Bank of Indiana, signed by the officers of the 
bank, which had been printed upon the genuine plate, altered 
80 as not to require the signature of Auditor or Register, and 
contai'iing the words '■^secured by -pledge of jndilic stocks."" These 
notes had been given b}" the engraver directly to the bank, with- 
out passing through the hands of the Auditor, and was a fraud. 

To remedy these evils and get the plates into the possession 
of this Department the following circular was issued: 

Bank Department, \ 

Indianapolis, April 21st, 1857. / 

Messrs. 

Bank Note Engrarers: 

The second section of the Free Banking Law of Indiana, 
passed ^larch 3d, 1855, makes the Auditor of State responsible 
that all bank notes to be issued in this State, shall be engraved 
and printed "in the best manner to guard against fraud and 
counterfeiting" — requires him to fix the amount of notes neces- 
• sary to be printed for any bank, and gives to this Department 
the control and custody of all plates and dies used in printing 
Biich bank notes. 

The third section of the law, while it gives to the Banking 
Associations the right to select the persons to do such work, and 
to make tlicir own terms for the payment of the same, does not 
in any way lessen the authority or responsibility of the Auditor 
of State. 

A proper execution of the law requires that, for the future, 
the following directions shall be observed in the engraving of 
plates and j)nnting of bank notes for the free banks of Indiana: 

No contract will be recogni/cd between any Banking Associ- 
ation and engravers, until a design of the plate to be engraved 
has Ijecn submitted to the inspection of this Department, and 
an order issued for the engraving and j)rinting of the same. 



143 

The amount of notes ordered will be forwarded to this office, 
with an afHdavit of the printer that the total anionut printed 
has been thus forwarded, accompanied by a voucher tliat the 
plate is deposited under tlie direction and subject to the order of 
this Department. 

In order that the plates of such banks as have been wound up 
may be destroyed, the engravers have been requested to forward 
to this office all plates and dies in their several establishments; 
and it is confidently exj)ected that this recpiest will be complied 
with hy those having plates and dies in their possession. 

In requiring an observance of these directions, this Depart- 
ment is actuated by a desire to preserve the credit of the Free 
Banks of Indiana, to guard the public against fraud, and to 
protect the rights of all parties concerned. 

JOIIj^ w. dodd, 

Auditor of State. 

Upon receipt of the foregoing circular the plates were promptly 
forwarded by the engravers, except those of the following banks, 
which were held on the plea that they had not been paid for, 
viz: Farmers and Mechanics Bank 1, 2, 5, 5 and 5, 10; Wa- 
bash Valley Bank 5, 5 and 10, 10; Allen Co. Bank 1, 5; Indi- 
ana Exchange Baidv 1, 5; N'orth Western bank, Rensselaer 1, 5, 
5, 10, and New York Traders Bank 1, 5. 

Statement "L" is a list of banks, the circulation of which, as 
registered, has been fully redeemed and the securities exhausted, 

JOHN W. DODD, 
, Auditor of State, 



STATEMENT A. 



EHIBITIKG the description and value of the securities of the 
Free Ban/:s, held by the Treasurer of Sta.te, on the Slst of Octo- 
ber, 1857 ; also of the securiti'S held by the Auditor of State for 
Banks that h.ace not complied with the law ofl^hh; and the circu- 
lation of each. 

BA:N'K of GOSHEN, GOSHEN. 

§9,000 ladinna live per cents, :it 80 cents, §7,200 

60,100 Indiana two and a-lialf per cents, at 

52 cents, 31,252 

9,500 Lonisiana six per cents, at 78 cents,... 7,410 
8,000 Tennessee live per cents, at 64 cents, 5,120 

§50,082 

Circnlation, 48,994 

BANK OF GOSPORT, GOSFORT. 

^89,774 Indiana two and a-half per cents, at 

52 cents, §46,682 

.20,000 Missonri six per cents, at 71 cents,... 14,200 

§60,882 

Circulation, 59,890 

BANK OF MOUNT VERNON, MOUNT VERNON. 

.§2,000 Indiana five per cents, at 80 cents,... §1,600 

11,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 7,810 

42,000 Georgia 7 per cents, at 95 cents, 39,900 

2,000 North Canjlina 6 per cents, at 83 

cents, 1,630 

*jr* §50,940 

Circulation, 49,189 

BANK OF INDIANA, MICHIGAN CITY. 

•\ 

160,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, §48,000 

Circulation,..., 20,998 



145 
BAXK OF PAOLI, PAOLI. 

$33,000 Louisiana (3 per cents, at 78 cents, f^25,740 

39,000 Missouri G per cents, at 71 cents, 27,(390 

,^53,430 

Circulation, 51,457 

BANK OF ROCKVILLE, WABASH. 

§54,000 Louisiana per cents, at 78 cents, §42,120 

11,000 Missouri per cents, at 71 cents, 7,810 

$49,930 

Circulation, 47,150 

: "■ • \ ■ 

BANK OF SALEM, NEW ALBANY. 

$ 1,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, §800 

15,000 Indiana 2;^- per cents, at 52 cents, 7,800 

500 Lousisiana 6 per cents, at 78 cents,... 390 

57,000 Missouri (3 per cents, at 71 cents, 40,470 

$49,460 

Circulation, 45,500 

BANK OF SALEM, SALEM. 

^80,000 Missouri G per cents, at 71 cents, $56,800 

Circulation, 51,927 

BLOOMINGTON BANK, BLOOMINGTON. 

^110,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, $78,100 

Circulation, 74,830 

CAMBRIDGE CITY BANK, CAMBRIDGE CITY. 

$27,500 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, §22,000 

51,334 Indiana 2-^ per cents, at 52 cents, 26,G93 

. $48,G93 

Circulation, 47,590 



146 

CANAL BANK, EVANSVILLE. 

$50,000 Indiana 5 per cents at 80 cents, $40,000 

500 Louisiana (3 per cents, at 78 cents, 390 

9,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 6,390 

$46,780 

Circulation, 46,000 

CENTRAL BANK, INDIANAPOLIS.— Closing. 

$15,000 Indiana 6 per cents, at 90 cents, $13,500 

1,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, 800 

$14,300 

Circulation, 14,278 

CRESCENT CITY BANK, EVANSVILLE. 

$57,600 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $46,080 

2,000 Louisiana 6 per cents, at 78 cents, 1,560 

2,500 Kentucky 6 per cents, at 93 cents, — 2,325 

$49,965 

Circulation, 45,781 

EXCHANGE BANK, GREENCASTLE. 

$85,758 Indiana 2| per cents, at 52 cents, $44,594 

5,000 Indiana 6 per cents, at 90 cents, 4,500 

$49,094 

Circulation, 47,421 

FARMERS' BANK, WESTFIELD. 

$51,500 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $41,200 

31,272 Indiana 2h per cents, at 52 cents, 16,261 

3,000 Indiana 6 per cents, at 90 cents, 2,700 

8,000 Louisiana 6 per cents, at 78 cents, 6,240 

$66,401 

Circulation , 56,568 

INDIANA BANK, xMADISON. 

$50,500 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $40,400 

46,077 Indiana 2^ per cents, at 52 cents, 23,959 

$64,359 

Circulation, 44,024 



147 



INDIAJSTA FARMERS' BAITK, FRANKLIN. 

)3,000 IiKliana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $42,400 

8,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 5,G80 

$48,080 

Circulation, 45,810 



KENTUCKY STOCK BANK, COLUMBUS. 

$54,G00 Lidiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, |43,680 

5,000 Lidiana 2^ per cents, at 52 cents, 2,600 

12,000 Louisiana 6 per cents, at 78 cents, 9,360 

22,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 15,620 

6,500 Georgia 6 per cents, at 81 cents, 5,265 

14,000 Kentucky 6 per cents, at 93 cents, 13,020 

$89,545 

Circulation, 83,990 



LAGRANGE BANK, LIMA. 

$14,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $11,200 

22,050 Indiana 2i per cents, at 52 cents, 11,466 

21,000 Louisiana 6 per cents, at 78 cents, 16,380 

13,000 Kentucky 6 per cents, at 93 cents, 12,090 

5,000 Tennessee 6 per cents, at 76 cents, 3,800 

5,000 North Carolina 6 per cents, at 83 

cents, 4,150 

Circulation, 56,889 



PARKE COUNTY BANK, ROCKVILLE. 

$100,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $80,000 

1,000 Indiana 2iV per cents, at 52 cents, .... 520 

$80,520 

Circulation, 76,152 



PRAIRIE CITY BANK, TERRE HAUTE. 

$85,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $68,000 

10,000 Indiana 2i per cents, at 52 cents, 5,200 

10,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 7,100 

$80,300 

Circulation, 08,055 



148 

SALEM BAXK, GOSHEN. 

$10,500 Iiuliana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, §8,400 

8,000 Indiana 2Vper cents, at 52 cents,. 4,100 

5,000 A^irginia (J per cents, at 81 cents, 4,050 

41,000 Lonisiana G per cents, at 78 cents, ol,l)S0 

§48,590 

Circnlation, 47,414 

SOUTHERNS' BAIiK OF INDIAXA, TERUE HAUTE. 

$65,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $52,000 

15,000 Virginia G per cents, at 81 cents, 12,150 

2,000 Louisiana G per cents, at 78 cents, 1,5G0 

37,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 26,270 

lijUL^vj icunesseo G per cents, at iG cents,... I:,.^b0 

104,260 

Circnlation, 91,778 

TIPPECAXOE BANK, LOGANSPORT.— Closing. • 

$10,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, .^8,000 

46,000 Indiana 2 J per cents, at 52 cents, 23.920 

8,000 Louisiana 6 per cents, at 78 cents, — 6,240 
6,000 Missouri 6 per cents, at 71 cents, 4,260 

§42,420 

Circulation,. 41,196 



.,>.4'- 



BANK,^ WHICH HAVE NOT COMPLIED WITH THE 

LAW OF 1855. 

BAXlv OE ELlvHART, ELKHART. 

$33,000 Indiana 5 per (-enls at 80 cent;-, §26,400 

Circulation, 25,498 



BANK OE [ni\'] CAlvrrOL, INDIANAPOLIS. 

Casli on Land, §2,750 

Circiilafioii, 2,745 

Ecdcenied by the Auditor at par. 



149 

BANK OF MONTICELLO, MONTICELLO. 

$2,000 Virginia G por cents, at 81 cents, $1,G20 

" Circnlation, 1,490 

BANK OF SYRACUSE, SYRACUSE. 

$1,000 Tndip.na 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $800 

11', 500 Lonisiana (J \)QV cents, at 78 cents, 15,210 

1,C00 Tennessee o per cents, at 04 cents,... G40 

$10,050 

Circnlation 1G,845 



T> 



^OOKYILLE "DA 27^1 EI100KVILT;E. 



?12,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $9,000 

9.000 Virginia G per cents, at 81 cents, 7,290 

$1G,890 

Circulation, - 15,8G7 



FAYETTE COUNTY BANK, CONNEBvSVILLE. 

$0,500 Virginia G per cents, at 81 cents, $2,835 

" Circulation, 3,000 



ITOOSIER BANK, LOGANSPORT. 

$9,000 Louisiana G per cents, at 78 cents, $7,020 

Cii'cnlallon, 7,104 



HUNTINGTON COUNTY BANK, HUNTINGTON. 

$2,000 Indian.a 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $1,G00 

4,000 Virginia G per cents, at 81 cents, 3,240 

$4,840 

Circnlation, 4,315 

INDIANA STOCK BANK, LAPORTE. 

p20,000 Indiana 5 per cents, at 80 cents, $16,000 

Circulation, 15,000 



150 

MERCITANTS' & MECHANICS' BANK, NEW ALBANY. 

§1,000 Georgia 6 per eonts, at 81 cents, $810 

3,000 Teniiessee per cents, at 76 cents,. ... 2,280 

$3,090 

Circulation, 4,931 



NEW YORK AND VIRGINIA STATE STOCK BANK, 

EVANSVILLE. 

$1,000 Virginia G per cents, at 81 cents, 

Circulation all redeemed. 



151 



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MCtRITtES HELD BY At DITOR OF STATE. 

Bank of Elkhart 

Bank of the Capitol 

Bank of Jlonticello 

Bank of Syracuse 

RrniiWvillp Blink 


Fayette County Bank 

llousier Bank 

lluiitinjrton County Bank 

Merchants' anil Mechanics' Bank 

X. Y. & Va. suite Stock Bank 


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cd Banks whose 
'he rate at which 
urities were sur- 



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175 


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$50 


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$225 
175 


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$50 00 



$406 00 
137 00 

$269 00 

$324 80 
109 60 

$215 20 



$1,252 00 
240 00 

Circulation outstanding $1,012 00 



^ 



154 



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D. 

Semi-Annanl Statement of the Condition of the Free Banlcs of Indiana on the first Monday in July, 1857, as shoicn by their returns made under oath to the A^tditor of State. 

RESOURCES. 



NAMES OF BANKS 



iiLf ll;i 



V.'« 



La 
J'a 

rniiiii! City ilJink, T--Tre Haute 

Salem Baiil;, Cialicii 

Soutlicm Bank of Iiidiaiin, TeiTe Haute 

Tipln-'caiioe Bank, Lfi;,'iliisi)ort 

Total 

I1»XK» WiilCil HAVE NOT COMPLlEn WITH THE LiW 0." 1855, 

Bunk of niklinit, Elkhali 

Bi-ookvUle Bank, Brookville 

Indiana Stock Bank, LaPorte 

Orand Total '■: 



.?0.j,275 75 
G7,533 00 
51, -108 OS 
58^132 44 
79,000 00 
05,000 00 
50,050 00 
00,757 02 
00,000 00 
71,168 00 
50,500 00 
80,100 CO 
52,100 (10 
70,000 00 

139,077 50 
50,390 00 
DJ,911 87 
9G,0S7 00 
83,883 32 

111,500 00 
57,500 00 

1-1,4,500 00 
50,740 00 



20,000 00 
' 18,000 00 



81,939 27 
11,159 CO 
143,019 52 



09,195 44 
30.442 10 
10,225 00 

157,250 09 
90,939 CO 
G-,4C5 75 
1,253 20 
74,100 80 
09,324 25 
24,724 80 

192,007 CO 



ir.,T49 88 
. C7,7C0 00 
19,700 84 



1,225 16 
1,595 00 
0,000 00 

901 CG 
0,349 C9 
8,995 55 
1,439 11 
2,511 81 

175 00 



Xotefl of other 
Banks and 
Checks. 



.?5,620 00 
2,751 00 
4,085 00 
4,994 00 

11,859 00 
3,035 00 

14,170 00 
5,829 00 
3,339 OO 

11,284 on. 

23,060 00 
37,812 00 
7,844 00 



7,500 00 
4,7C2 00 
3,088 CO 



1.033 00 
25,785 30 
1,C43 00 



I j Value of Rcil 

;Duc from Ea'ks ,?f5*?;,''A'''^"' 
.nn,lT!nnl-„.,_ "'y ^ the trans- 



16,050 I 
23,052 ( 
2,504 ( 



821,496 16 
9,575 05 
25,355 97 
8,271 95 
02,994 57 
38,113 99 
5,490 96 
19,234 70 
13,230 00 
11,500 54 
34,700 46 
11,162 15 
5,049 39 
29,359 25 
12,932 54 
3,145 70 
4,512 20 
481 78 
19,644 83 
12,181 31 
19,525 95 
25,186 41 



.54,233 18 
10,013 89 
12,570 94 

0,612 62 
11,348 43 

7,630 45 
11,500 74 
12,194 13 

7,555 17 
12,513 55 
10,491 49 
15,284 18 

8,283 80 

7,854 00 
2U,C28 03 
19,351 OO 
18,006 93 

0,410 02 

7,613 04 
13,800 05 

4,441 46 
17,922 00 

6,123 68 



9,909 04 



9,520 79 
4,830 00 
5,778 34 



.?91 00 

"9,053' oo' 



■SI 40,758 tS 
177,1)2 15 
102,211 91 

96,143 24 
249,232 03 
129,833 80 
238 102 18 
220,315 74 
195,474 12 
■217,845 20 
311,012 05 
224,866 87 
119,149 84 
117,438 25 
402,44? or 
192,332 80 
194,744 75 
128,142 06 
214,845 27 
248,181 92 
129,708 32 
420,342 98 

07,813 68 



4,.751,354 37 



78,821 10 
133,326 00 
103,402 94 



LIABILITIES. 



1 

1 


^ . 

NAMES OP BANKS. 


Capital Stock^ 


Due to banks 
und Bankers. 


Due Deposi. 

tors^ 


Notes in clr- 
culasion . 


Time Bills, 
and other ev- 
idences of 
debt. 


Losses charg- 
ed upon Cap- 
itol. 


LosSBs charg- 
ed upon prof- 
its. 


Dividends 
not paid. 


Profit and 
Lose. 


Suiiilus fund. 


Other Lia- 
bilities. 


Total. 


1 

2 
1 


DASKa WHICH HAVE COMPLIH) WITH rill! lAW OK 185j. 

Bank uf tioslicn, Goshen 

Bank of Gosliorl, Gosport ^ 


825,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00 
23,053 04 
50,000 00 
59,350 00 
74,705.00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
81,200 00 

100,000 00 
71,050 00 
50,350 00 
70,000 00 

123,500 00 
90,029 02 
50.000 00 
C0,026 00 
80,600 00 
82,700 00 
50,000 00 

200,000 00 
9,700 00 


$3,976 83 

5,996 84 

202 08 

635 86 

43,778 00 

1,593 76 

2,446 47 

115 79 

18,317 10 

149 35 

057 47 

5,785 07 

258' 18 ' 

""'e,773'ri" 


343,302 13 
^22,976 28 
20,343 87 
23,420 34 
80,574 29 
11,823 48 
107,178 95 
89,008 51 
38,001 37 
65,573 80 
47,270 78 
90,884 78 
17,321 50 

"143,519 67' 
50,720 00 
■ 00,439 57 
2,245 30 
41,798 34 
02,743 73 
28,192 54 
92,160 55 
2,481 34 


$56,209 110 
47,200 00 
20.993 00 
49,025 00 
59,959 00 
54,140 00 
45,500 00 
71,921 00 
81,830 00 
60,950 00 
40,000 00 . 
49,496 06 
47,421 CO 
40,493 Co' 
■ 90,524 00 
45,810 00 
M,990 00 
60,020 00 
76'245 00 
77,024 00 
47,014 CO 
J18,995 00 
47,040 00 






$12,210 92 


" "siliis's-j"' 


"" "i.ora'so"' 

"'"'"lii74"05"" 

"""■4i925"iii'" 
"'"'3',G5l"c2"" 

""'"l8iii4"95"" 

sis'ie"'" 

422 45 
0,,i95 88 
8,4G2 48 
4,661 78 






$140,758 88 
177,352 15 


4 

5 
6 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
IG 
17 
18 
19 
2U 
21 


Bank of Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon 

Bank of I'noli. IV.li 

Bank ol r..ckvillc, Wabash 

Bank "f ,■;, km. N./.v Albany 

Bank .,r ? ilin.. .^alcra - 

I.. : "1 :;:i;': ■.■■'■^■'■^'.■[■..'.[■l'.l^iV.llV.'\V.]]'.'.\'.]'.\'.'.\'."\\'.V.'.\ 

In: 1 ::, , i■..nk.?rmk\\'ny■y■y■y■y.y■y.v^y/////^'.y.v.y^\]'.]]y/.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

!<■! : I'll'... Columbus 

I'arke t. rjiinly liank, Itockville 

Prairie City Bank, Terrc Haute 

Salem Bank, Goshen 

Southern Bank of Indiana, Terre Haute 

Tippecanoe Bank, Loi^ansport , 


'"s'l'.ooti'oo" 

""l3',205'74" 

"■"1,000 06" 
0,210 90 


"'".Vr,397"5o"" 
5,422 91" 

iio'oo" 


"'""lii30"-i9"' 
""h',i)hi7(l" 

"'"10^122 '82"' 

""uKoie" 
liii'oi)"' 

iiirdo"" 


796"67"" 

5,607 40 

""oi563"s7"" 
5,047 00 

2,730 53"" 
940 25 

"""4",556"!«"" 


"""""$C02"37"" 

■""""i',Sd"3i"' 

70i"78"" 

"'"'"4",lio6 lio'" 
""'2Gi527"47'" 

■"""3iiio6"65"" 


""""l"4",3i8 37" 
""l05",563"48"" 

"""".ejire'co"" 


90,143 24 
249,232 03 
lC9,t:3 .. 
238,102 18 
230,315 74 
195,474 12 
217,845 20 
311,012 05 
224,860 87 
119,140 84 
117,438 25 
402,423 07 
192,332 80 
194,744 75 
128,142 CO 
214,845 27 
248,181 92 






14,187 43 




426,»12 98 

07,815 09 


23 


1,863 18 


1 
2 
3 


Bank of Elkhart 

Brookville Bank, Brookville 

Indiana Stock Bank, LaPorte 


1,607,8(13 96 
32,949 56 

77,500 00 

11,000 00 


94,550 19 

""Vjooo'ffi" 


1,148,170 48- 

7,706 44 
36,390 00 
36,090 73 


1,374,770 00 

25,497 00 
19,436 00 
24JI00 00 


21,425 70 

10,006 35 
""'2bi366"42"" 


7,170 41 


31,571 89 
1,671 81 


27,420 02 


51,995 30 
6,059 79"' 


51,055 41 


128,359 85 


4,55-1,354 37 

78,821 10 
133,326 00 
103,462 94 


= 


Grand Total 


1,729,313 52 


99,610 21 


1,228,447 65 


1,443,7X13 00 


52,698 47 


7,170 41 


33,243 70 


27,420 .02 


58,955 15 


51,055 41 


128,359 85 


4,609,964 47 



To follow page 154, 1 I). J. 



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STATEMENT E. 



A STATEMENT of the comlition of the Saspendrd Banks whose 

Notes are redeemed by the Auditor of State, icifh the rate at which 
each is redeemed,; also, a list of Banks lohose securities were sur- 
rendered by my 'predecessor. , 

AGRICULTURAL BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $225 00 

Circulation redeemed 175 00 

Circulation outstanding $50 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $225 00 

Cash paid out 175 00 

Cash on hand , $50 00 

Redeemed at par. 

ATLANTIC BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $406 00 

Circulation redeemed 137 00 

Circulation outstanding $269 00 

Cash on hand, January 25, 1857 $324 80 

Cash paid out 109 60 

Cash on hand $215 20 

Redeemed at 80 cents. 

BANK OF ALBANY. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $1,252 00 

Circulation redeemed 240 00 

Circulation outstanding $1 ,012 00 

10 



156 

Cash on liaiul January 25,1857, s?l,l-"l 30 

Cash paid out ' 210 00 

Cash on hand §915 30 

Redeemed at. 90 cents. 

BA:!^K of ATTICA. 

Cirenlation outstandhig January 25,1857 $1,858 00 

Circula lion rcdeen lod , 401 00 

Circulation outstanding $1,-157 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 §1,074 50 

Cash paid out , '.... 356 89 

Cash on hand §1,317 61 

lieeleeined at 89 cents. 

BANK OF AMiaaCA. 

Circuhition outstanding January 25,1857 li?070 00 

Circulation redeemed 155 00 



Circuhition outstanding §515 00 

Cash on liand Jamiary 25, 1857 §592 30 

Cash jiaid out ^. 134 85 

Cash on liand 457 51 

Redeemed at 87 cents. 



BAl^K OF BRIDGEPORT. 

Circuhition outstanding January 25, 1857, §83 00 

Circulation redeemed 16 00 



Circulation outstanding $67 00 

Cash on li:nid danuarv 25, 1857 $88 69 

Cash paid out .' 14 OS 

Cash on hand §74 61 

Redeemed at 88 cents. 



157 

BANK OF ALBION. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $680 00 

Circul ation redeemed 360 00 

Circulation outstanding 320 00 

Proceeds of bonds sold April 30, 1857 $820 00 

Cash paid out 360 00 

Cash on hand $460 00 

Redeemed at par. 

BANK OF COVINGTON. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $116 00 

Circulation all redeemed 116 00 

Cash on hand January 25,1857 $100 94 

Cash all paid out 100 94 

^ BANK OF CONNERSVILLE. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $19,499 00 

Cireu hition redeemed 2,714 00 

Circulation outstanding $17,785 00 

Cash on hand Januarv 25, 1857 $17,081 63 

Cash paid out ."...... 2,361 18 

Cash on hand $14,720 45 

' Kedeemed at 87 cents. 

BANK OF NOKTII AMEPvICA. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $15,720 00 

Circulation redeemed 14,060 00 

Circulation outstanding $1,660 00 

Proceeds of bonds sold April 30, 1857 $14,148 00 

Cash paid out 12,654 00 

Cash on hand $1,494 00 

Redeemed at 90 cents. 
1 D. J.— 12. 



158 

BANK OF PERRYSVILLE. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 

Circulation redeemed 

Circulation outstanding 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 

Cash paid out 

Cash on hand |48 00 

Redeemed at par. 

BANK OF ROCKPORT. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $40 00 

Circulation redeemed 10 00 



172 
24 


00 
00 


$48 00 


$72 
24 


00 
00 



Circulation outstanding $30 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $40 00 

Cash vaid out 10 00 

Cash on hand ' $30 00 

Redeemed at par. 

BANK OF SOUTH BEND. 

Circulation outstanding January 25i> 1857 $435 00 

Circulation redeemed 240 00 



Circulation outstanding $195 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $435 00 

Cash paid out '. 240 00 

Cash on hand $195 00 

Redeemed at par. 

BANK OF T. WARDSWORTH. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $35 00 

Circulation redeemed 6 00 



Circulation outstanding $29 00 



159 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $38 39 , 

Cash paid out 5 46 

Cash on hand $32 93 

Redeemed at 91 cents. 

DROVERS BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857... $162 00 

Circulation redeemed 221 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $187 42 

Cash paid out 187 42 

ELKHART COUNTY BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $901 00 

Circulation redeemed 582 00 

Circulation outstanding $319 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $873 97 

Cash paid out 564 54 

Cash on hand $309 43 

Redeemed at 97 cents. 



FARMERS BANK, JASPER. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $1,180 00 

Circulation redeemed 281 00 

Circulation outstanding $899 0^ 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $1,098 38 

Cash paid out 255 71 

Cash on hand $842 67 

Redeemed at 91 cents. 



FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK, INDIANAPOLIS. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $269 00 

Circulation all redeemed 270 00 



160 

Cash ou hand Jauuaiy 25, 1857 $269 00 

Cash paid out 270 00 



GREENE COUNTY BANK. 

Circidation outstanding January 25, 1857 $35 00 

Circuhition all redeemed 35 00 

Cash on hand January 25,1857 $25 31 

Cash all paid out 25 31 



INDIAN RESERVE BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $22,616 00 

Circulation redeemed 15,233 00 

Circulation outstanding $7,383 00 

Bonds on hand January 25, 1857 $24,000 00 

Bonds surrendered $5,000 00 

Bonds sold 19,000 00 

$24,000 00 

Proceeds of $19,000 bonds sold [ $17,408 75 

Cash paid out 9,596 50 

Cash on hand $7,812 25 

KALAMAZOO BANK. 

Circuhition outstanding January 25, 1857 $727 00 

Circulation redeemed 168 00 



Circulation outstanding $559 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $654 30 

Cash paid out 151 20 

Cash on liand $503 10 

Redeenic<l at 90 cents. . - 



161 

LAUREL BANK. .. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $751 00 

Circulation redeemed 270 00 

Circulation outstanding $481 00 

Cash on hand January 25,1857 $048 80 

Cash paid out 221 40 

Cash on hand $427 40 

Redeemed at 82 cents. 

N0RTHER:N" INDIANA BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $1,080 00 

Circulation redeemed 541 00 

Circulation outstanding $539 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $907 97 

Cash paid out \ 449 03 

Cash on hand $458 94 

Redeemed at 83 cents. 

ORANGE BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $78 00 

Circulation redeemed 18 00 

Circulation outstanding $60 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857.. $78 00 

Cash paid out 18 00 

Cash on hand $60 00 

Redeemed at par. 

SAVINGS BANK OF INDIANA, CONNERSVILLE. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $7,000 00 

Circulation redeemed 5,590 00 

Circulation outstanding $1,410 00 



162 

Proceeds of boiids sold April 30, 1857 $4,830 00 

Cash paid out 3,857 10 

Cash on hand $972 90 

Redeemed at 69 cents. 

STATE STOCK BANK OF INDIANA, PERU. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $2,096 00 

Circulation redeemed 693 00 

Circulation outstanding $1,403 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $1,839 40 

Cash paid out 589 05 



Cash on hand $1,250 35 

Redeemed at 85 cents. 

STATE STOCK BANK, MARION. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $583 00 

Circulation redeemed 147 00 



Circulation outstanding $436 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857, $552 00 

Cash paid out 132 30 

Cash on hand $419 70 

Redeemed at 90 cents. 

I 

TRADERS' BANK, NASHVILLE. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $1,249 00 

Circul ation redeemed 187 00 

Circulation outstanding $1,062 00 



163 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $1,102 79 

Cash paid out 172 04 

Cash on hand $930 75 

Redeemed at 92 cents. 

WABASH VALLEY BANK. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 P,703 00 

Circulation redeemed 1,039 00 

Circulation outstanding $664 00 

Cash on hand, January 25, 1857 $1,359 68 

'- Cash paid out 955 88 

Cash on hand $403 80 

Redeemed at 92 cents. 



WAYNE BANK, RICHMOND. 

Circulation outstanding January 25, 1857 $240 00 

Circulation redeemed 165 00 

Circulation outstanding $75 00 

Cash on hand January 25,1857 $240 00 

Cash paid out 165 00 

Cash on hand $75 00 

Redeemed at par. 

WAYNE BANK, LOaANSPORT. 

Circulation oustanding January 25, 1857 $740 00 

Circulation redeemed 240 00 

Circulation outstanding $500 00 

Cash on hand January 25, 1857 $740 00 

Cash paid out 240 00 

Cash on hand $500 00 

Redeemed at par. 



Tlie following is a list of Banks, tlie securities of which were 
surrendered by my predecessor, leaving circulation unprovided 
for, except as the owners or stockholders are responsible : 

Bank of Rochester $177 00 

Bank of Warsaw 2,227 00 

Delaware County Bank 709 00 

Gramercv Bank 31,383 00 

Great Western Bank 1,073 00 

North Western Bank 755 00 

Shawnee Bank - 21,171 00 

Traders' Bank, Indianapolis 849 00 

Wabash River Bank, New Corydon 625 00 



STATEMKiST F. 

Exhibiting the names of the Shareholders, aiixl the amount of Stock 
owned by each individual in the several Banks, as rejjorted to this 
office on the first Monday in October, 1857. 

BANK OF GOSPORT, GOSPORT. 



Capital Stock 



Capital... $100,000 



Names of Stockholders. 



Noah Allison 

A. L. Alexander 

Elisha McGinnis 

J. E. Goss 

Melinda Hays 

J.J. Alexander 

Isabel Dunning's heirs.. 
Lawson Shirley s's heirs. 

J. M. Smith 

J. H. Johnson 

Wm. Alexander 

B. F.Hays 

E. J. Alexander 

Dunning & Scott 

Thomas Alverson 

John Stairwalt 

J. H. Woodswall 

Lem. Gentry 

David Allen 

Philip Hodges 

P. M. Blankenship 

John S. Cash 

George Post 

W. D. Alexander 

J. M. Stucky 

Jesse M. Hays 

Isaac E. Johnson 

James M. Alexander . . . 

J. S. Buchanan 

Richard Laughlin 

J. M. Cash 

A. Brown 

J. Ettenliach 

Jos. Johnson 

Samuel McGinnis 

Dagley & Miller 

L. M. Hays 



Total. 



Owen CO., Ind... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Monroe co., Ind. 
Owen CO., Ind.. . 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Monroe co., Ind. 

do 
Morgan co., Ind. 

do 
Floyd CO., Ind.. . 

do 
Owen CO., Ind.. • 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



No. of 
Shares. 



100 

2 
20 
10 
50 
10 

4 
10 

8 
50 
10 

6 

50 
10 
10 
10 
12 
100 
20 
50 
20 

4 

10 

753 

2 

2 
100 

5 
10 
10 

7 
135 

5 

20 

10 

15 

350 



2,000 



$5,000 
100 

1,000 
500 

2,500 
500 
200 
500 
400 

2,500 
500 
300 

2,500 
500 
500 
500 
600 

5,000 

1,000 

2,500 

1,000 
200 
5(X) 
37,650 
100 
100 

5,000 
250 
500 
500 
350 

6,750 
250 

1,000 

500 

750 

17,500 



$100,000 



BANK OF INDIANA, MICHIGAN CITY. 

[No. Report. 1 



166 



STATEMENT F. — Continued. 



BANK OF GOSHEN, GOSHEN. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital... $200,000 



Names of Stockholders 



J. n. Barnes 

,T. H. Defrees .... 
W. A. Thompson. 
M. Mercer 



Total . 



Goshen, Ind. 
do 
do 
do 



No. of 
Shares. 



son 
400 
400 
400 



2,000 



$80,000 
40,000 
40,000 
40.000 



.^200,000 



BANK OF MOUNT VERNON, MOUNT VERNON. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital. . SlOO 000 



Names of Stockholders. 



Richard Barter 

John A. Mann 

J. A. Mann, trustee 

Philips & Leavenworth. . 

Thomas Newman 

Chas. F. Leonard 

A. Lichteberger 

B. AmVirewster 

E. T. Sullivan 

.James Whitworth 

T. J. Ilinch 

S. S. Dryden 

James Davis 

Virgil Soper 

John 1!. Evertson 

n. Carter 

Elizabeth Ilass 

W. W. Weare 

Andrew Kak 

Estate of Aaron llobinson 

J, Reberye 

Nettlcton, Lowry & Co. . 

W illiam J . Lowry 

N. G. Nettleton 

W. Boig 

Chas. Ilass 

Total 



Residence. 



No. of 
Shares. 



Mt. Vernon, Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Posey county, Ind. . . 
Mt. Vernon, Ind . . . . 

do 

do 

Posey county, Ind . . 

do 

do 

New Harmony, Ind . 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

do 

do 

Posey county, Ind. . 
Mt. Vernon, Ind . ... 



104 

69 

452 

48 
37 

27 

17 
7 
7 
6 
(i 
5 
4 
4 
4 
2 
1 
4 
2 
2 
4 
68 
03 
41 
7 
4 



Amount. 



$10,400 

6,900 

45,200 

4,800 

3,700 

2,700 

1,700 

700 

700 

600 

600 

500 

400 

400 

400 

200 

100 

400 

200 

200 

400 

6,800 

6,800 

4,100 

700 

400 



1,000 



$100,000 



167 



STATEMENT F. — Continued. 



BANK OF PAOLI, PAOLI. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital.... $50,000 



Names of Stockholders. 



.Taffies M. Ilains . 
Martha Frisliie. .. 

C.White 

M. J. Woodford , 

T. Frislne 

Samuel Stalcup . . 
John T. Throop., 

John Frazer 

R. S. Frisbie 

J. Hargavy 

M. L. Owen 

A. M. Black 

J. L. Frisliie 

J. A. Wininger . . 
Peter S. Ketner . . 



Total . 



Residence. 



New Albany, Ind . . . . 

do 

Paoli, Ind 

do 

New Albany, Ind 

Orange County, Ind. 

Paoli, Ind 

do 

New Alliany, Ind . . . . 

do 

do 

Paoli, Ind 

New Alliany, Ind 

Orange County, Ind. 
Paris, France 



No. of 

Shaies. 



200 

lU 

1 

2 

130 
5 



$20,000 

1,000 

100 

200 

13,(300 

500 

200 

500 

1,000 

3,000 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,500 

5,000 



$50,000 



BANK OF ROCKVIT.LE, WABASH. 



Capital Stock. 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
Shares. 


Amount. 


Capital.... $59,350 


W. F. Parker 


Cleveland, Ohio 

do 


10 
25 


$1,000 
2,500 








do 


"n 


2 COO 






do .50 

do 10 

do 50 

do 25 

do 2}i 

do 20 

do .. ! 11 


5,000 
1,000 
5,000 
2 500 




T. B Brockway 












C. H. Robinson 


250 


% - - " 




'>,000 






1,000 
3 0(10 




H. D Clement 


do 

do 

do .... 


30 

GO 

5 






6,000 
500 








W.P.Cook& Co 


do 


"i< 


250 






do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


25 
35 
25 
20 
5 
30 
18 


2,500 
3,500 
2,500 




0. N. Skeels 


















J. W. Wasson 


3,000 
1,800 




C . W. Delenbauf h 




Total 












168 
STATEMENT F.— Continued. 

BANK OF SALEM, NEW ALBANY. 



Capital Stock. 



CapitU... S'^00,000 



Names of Stockholders. 



Residence. 



A. S. Burnett 

M. A. Richardsori. 
W. C. DePauw.... 
J. B. Winstanly. . . 

A. Bradley 

L.Bradley 

D. Lyon 

J. H. Beeler 

J. L. Menaugh. ... 

E. Newland 

J. H. McMahan. . . 

E.Sabin 

Daniel Sealirook . . 
Anna 0. Scribner . . 

5. P. Town 

J. S. Winstanly. . . 

6. Gardson 



New Albany, Ind. . 
Louisville, Ky . . .. 

Salem, Ind 

New Albany, Ind. . 
do 
do 

Salem, Ind 

do 

do 

New Albany, Ind. . 
do 

Bedford, Ind 

New Albany, Ind. . 
Floyd county, Ind 
New Albany, Ind. . 

do 
Floyd county, Ind 



Total . 



No. of 
Shares. 



200 

100 

1,064 

100 

5 

5 

5 

5 

1 

457 

5 

5 

17 

6 

10 

5 

10 



2,000 



$20,000 

10,000 

106,400 

10,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

100 

45,700 

500 

500 

1,700 

GOO 

1,000 

500 

1,000 



$200,000 



BANK OF SALEM, SALEM. 



Capital Sto<;k. 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 

Shares. 


Amount. 


Capital.... 550,000 






899 
40 
40 

20 

1 


$44,950 

2,090 

2,000 

1,000 

50 




(Jo 




J H Butler 


do 






do 






do 




Total 








1,000 


$50,000 



BLOOMINGTON BANK, BLOOMINGTON. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital.... $50,000 



Names of StookhoMera. 



R. W. Akin 

W. C. Tarkington. 

Elias Abel 

S. H. Buskirk .... 

Jas. IIu>;)ies 

J.O Howe 

M. Hifiht 

A. M. Murphy 

L. S. Gentry 

W. B. Gentry .... 
J. W.Gentry 



Total 



Bloomington, Ind. 
do 

<lo 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Monroe county, Ind 
do 
do 



No. of 
Shares. 



280 
165 
10 
10 
5 
5 
10 
5 



$28,000 

16,500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

300 

200 

$50,000 



169 



STATEMENT F. — Continued. 



CAMBRIDGE CITY BANK, CAMBRIDGE CITY. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital.... $98,800 



Names of Stockholders. 



Barbary A. Pence 

Nathaniel Strong 

D. Hardman 

Myer & Bond 

Jacob Vore 

C. H. &E. Raymond 
Jonathan Hawkins... 

A. B. Claypool 

Jas. Vanuxen & Son. 

Jno. S. Dill 

Wm. Lenberger 

Jacob Heist 

J. A. Smith 

M. Thornburgh 

Mary Sink 



Total 



Refidence. 



Ohio , 

do 

Wayne county, Ind 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
<lo 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



No. of 
shares. 



] 

50 
13 
18 
13 
10 
1 



Amount. 



$1,300 

3,000 

6,000 

; 4,000 

3,000 

100 

600 

200 

100 

5,000 

1,3(10 

],8U) 

i.rioo 

1.000 

loo 



$93,800 



CANAL BANK, EVANSVILLE.* 



Capital Stock 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
shares. 


Amount, 


Capital.... $100,000 




Evansville, Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 






G. MaGhee 






C. Viele 






E. L. Babcock 
















•- 


H. D Allis 












Saml. Hall 






Total 















July Report 



170 



STATE>.IE:srT F.— Contiimed. 



CRESCENT CITVBANK, EVANSVILLE. 



Capital Stock. 



• Capital $250,000 



Names ^ Stockholders. 



Jas. H. McLanahan , 

Ilez. Easton 

S. D. Cul'oertson 

Jas. Nill 

Thos. J. Early 

J. M. Iliester 

H. S. Stoner 

T. B. Kennedy 

E. Culbertson 

Daniel 0. Gehi- 

Eliza Scott 

D. S. Piper 

Samuel Hall 

Wm. Shelby 

"Willard Carpenter . . 

William Baker 

J. A. Reitz 

C. Reitz 

Allis & Haweg 

Samuel Orr 

T. E. Garvin 

W. H. Walker 

Conrad Baker 

Phillip Decker 

John Law 



Residence. 



New York city 

London, Pa 

Chambersburgh, Pa 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Bristol, Pa 

Quincy, Pa 

Princeton, Ind 

Newljurgh, Ind . 

Evansville, Ind. — 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



No. of 
shares. 



250 

220 

254 

40 

60 

50 

30 

80 

20 

40 

40 

100 

120 

10 

710 

160 

100 

100 

100 

20 

30 

20 

20 

20 

20 



Total . 



2671 



$7,500 

5,500 

12,700 

1,000 

1,500 

1,250 

1,050 

2,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

2,500 

3,000 

200 

17,750 

4,000 

2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 



t $74,450 



Amount subscribed. 



t Amount paid in. 



EXCHANGE BANK, GREENCASTLE. 



Cai)ital Stock. 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
shares. 


Amount. 


Capital... «50,350 




Greencastle, Ind 

do 

Indianapolis, Ind. . . 
Putnam co., Ind. ... 
Hendricks CO., Ind. . 
Greencastle, Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


400 

200 

200 

20 

140 

35 

2 

2 

3 

2 

3 


$20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
1,000 
7,000 
1,750 






A D Wood 
















T 0. Allen 


100 






100 






150 






100 






150 




Total 




^ 


1007 


50,350 











171 



STATEMENT F.— Continued. 



FARMERS' BANK, OF WESTFIELD. 



Capital Stock. 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
shares. 


Amount. 


Capital.... $70,000 




Indianapolis, Ind . . . 


1400 


$70,000 





INDIANA BANK, MADISON. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital.. ..$123,500 



Names of Stockholders. 



E. R. Butler 

R. S. McKee 

Phillip Scheik 

Shrevvsburry & Price 

A. W. Pitcher 

S. M. Strader 

E. G. Whitney 

Samuel Polleys 

James Ilill 

J. S. Weger 

A.M. Whitney 

R. Whitney 

Low & Whitney 

A. W. Conant 



A. P. Conant Boston, Mass 



Madison, Ind .. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Louisville, Ky. 

do 

do 

do 



No. of 
Shares. 



172 



STATEMENT F.— Continued. 



INi'IAXA FARMMUS' BANK. FRANKLIN. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital.... S120,000 



Names of Stockholders. 



E . Herriott 

S. Herriott 

Mrs. L . Hen-iott 

J. V. Branham, Jr 

G. W. Branham 

J. S. White 

M. Gullett 

E. Baldwin 

Baldwin & Payne 

J. P. Banta 

George King 

Overstreet & Hunter 

R. T. Oversti-eet 

W. H. Manning 

C. Gauss 

J. S. McClelland & Bro. . . 

J. S. Houffham 

J. T. Forsyth 

W. H. Jennings 

F. M. Finch 

G. Hicks 

D. Hicks 

J. H. Donnell 

White & Branham 

L. Adams 

Johnson Lodge I. 0. 0. F- 

S.P.Oylr 

F. M. Furgerson 

H. M. Caslin 

J. Paniiys 

George Bridges 

E. W. Morgan 

W. Ditman 

L. W. Fletcher 

J. H. Paunnys 

J. L. Bradley 

A. H. Adams 

D. D. Brewer 

J. n. Legate 

R. Hamilton 

Mrs. J. Alexand;r 

Jno. Herriott 

W. Vickerman 

Jacob Fisher 

Rickets & Daily 

Jno. Clark 

P. M. Parks 

Samuel Cutsmyer 

Pleiis. Prewette 

Jas. Hayes 

N. Kyle 



Total 



Franklin, Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Johnson Co. Ind. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Edinburgh, Ind . . 

do 
Martinsville, Ind. 
Shelby Co. Ind... 

do 

do 

do 



No. of 
Shares. 



5 

117 

5 

20 

70 

5 

10 

20 

20 

121 

101 

15 

13 

27 

10 

20 

55 

20 

15 

19 

5 

5 

25 

10 

1 

4 

5 

10 



Amount. 



20 
10 
40 
20 
10 
10 
15 
10 
15 
10 
30 
10 
10 
10 
10 
70 



$500 00 

11,700 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

7,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 

12,100 00 

10,100 00 

1,500 00 

1,300 00 

2,700 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

5,500 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,900 00 

500 00 

500 00 

2,500 SO 

1,000 00 

100 00 

400 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 

2,500 00 

6,500 00 

1,000 00 

2,300 00 

i,ono 00 

600 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
3,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 (10 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
7,000 00 



$120,000 00 



173 
STATEMENT F.— Continued. 

KENTUCKY STOCK BANK, COLUMBUS. 



C::pital stock. 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
Shares. 


Amount. 


Capital $50,000 




Columbus, Ind 

do 

do 


200 
200 
100 


$20,000 00 
20,000 00 
10,000 00 


W F. Pid^eon 




B. F. Jones .... 




Total 




500 


$50,000 00 











LAGRANGE BANK, LIMA. 



Capital Stock. Names of Stockholders. 

i 


Residence. 


No. of 
Shares. 


Amount. 


Capital «60,000 


S. P. Williams 




400 
200 

600 


$40,000 00 
20,000 00 

$60,000 00 


J. B. Howe 


do 




Total 





PARKE COUNTY BANK, ROCKVILLE. 



Capital Stock. 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
Shares. 


Total. 


Capital ... $100,000 


George K . Steele 


Rockville, Ind 

do 

do 

do 

Parke co., Ind 

Rockville, Ind 

Parke co., Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Waveland, Ind 

Parke co., Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


160 
50 
50 
70 
20 

5 

10 

270 

5 

5 
15 
10 
20 
20 
28 
20 
30 
10 
30 

S 

10 
20 
75 
10 

4 


$16,000 
5,000 
5,000 
7,000 
2,000 

500 

1,000 

27,000 

500 

500 
1^600 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,800 
2,000 
3,000 
1,000 
3,000 

500 
1,000 
2,006 
7,500 
1,000 

400 














Perley Mitchell 








S Tusk 








C. W. Levin 's 












Wm. Aydelotte 












Wm. D Burford . . 






. a 














D. H. Maxwell 




D. W. Starke 




Wm. Strain 








B. C. Hobbs 




Phebe Mitchell 




Total 

















1 D. J.— 13. 



174 

STATEMENT F.— Contiimed. 

PRAIRIE CITY BANK, TERRE HAUTE. 



Capital Stock. 



Capital .... SS-2,'00 



Names of Stockholders. 



Elizabeth Ilanna 

James M. Hanna 

E.Cruft 

S. B. Gookins 

John R. Cunnincham 

MarvBell .". 

W.B. Tuell 

James H. Turner 

A. M. McGregor 

E. S.Wolfe 

C. Cruft 

John Jacobs • • 

JohnH. O'Boyle 

H. D. Williams & Co 

L. G. Wai-ren 

John F. King 

C. W. Barbour 

Sai-ah King 

J. D. Eaily 

John S. Beach 

L. Ryce 

S. S. Early 

T. B. Armstrong, deceased. 

W. J. Ball 

W. D. Griswold 

Mai-y S. Linton 

Harriet R. Linton 

L. H. Scott 

Elizabeth Hughes 

Robert Taylor 

H. Sturges 

W. Brewster 

John W. Davis 

James C. Grimes 

Oliver Bound 

James H. O'Boyle 

John Rea 

E. Tassett 

Daniel A. Jones 

H.L.King 

JohiJ Whitcomb 

B. R. Whitcomb 



Total. 



Residence. 



Terre Haute, Ind. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Bristol, Pa 

do 

do 
Montezuma, Ind . 

Marshall, 111 

Zanesville, 

do 

Carlisle, Ind 

Sullivan, Ind. . .. 

do 

Ind 

Philadelphia, Pa.. 

New York 

Ohio 

Albany, N.Y 

Clinton, Ind 

do 



No. of 
Shai-es. 



1 
5 

25 
10 

4 

10 

15 

45 

5 

50 

5 

50 

4 

9 

5 

5 

21 

5 

10 

10 

48 

20 

10 

50 

50 

60 

10 

10 

10 

25 

50 

40 

7 

5 

5 



$5,000 

2,500 

500 

600 

* 4,000 

500 

100 

500 

2,500 

1,00(1 

200 

400 

1,000 

1,500 

4,500 

500 

5,000 

500 

5,000 

400 

900 

500 

500 

2,100 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

4,800 

2,000 

1,000 

5,000 

5,000 

6,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

2,500 

5,000 

4,000 

700 

500 

5(X) 



$82,700 



SALEM BANK, GOSHEN. 



Capital Stock. 


Ncimes of StKckholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
Shares. 


Amount. 


Capital $50,000 






250 

250 


$25,000 
25,000 




do 





Total 




500 


$50,000 



175 

STATEMENT F.— Contiuiied. 

SOUTHERN BANK OF INDIANA, TERRE HAUTE. 



Capital Stock 


Names of Stockholders. 


Residence. 


No. of 
Shares. 


Amount. 


Capital . . . $200,000 




Terre Haute, Ind 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Erie Pa 


1,755 
50 
40 

5 
10 
10 
15 

5 
15 

5 
65 

5 
10 

5 

5 


$175,500 
5,000 


E. S. Wolfe 






4,000 
500 








M M Williams 


1,000 
1,000 
1,500 




M M Williams 




II. Ross 






500 






1,500 
500 








F S Williams 


6,500 




R Hecate 


500 






1,000 






500 






Philadelphia, Pa.... 


500 




Total 






2,000 


$200,000 



Note. — Some of the Banks did not report the number of shares and amount. 



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[L.] 



The circulation of the following Banks has been once re- 
deemed, and the securities entirely exhausted; but from some 
cause, notes on these Banks are occasionally presented at this 
department for redemption : 



Bank of Coviniton. 


Perry County Bank. 


Bank of Fort Wayne. 


Plymouth Bank. 


Bank of North America, Newport. 


Public Stock Bank. 


Bank of Rensselaer. 


State Stock Bank, Jamestown. 


Drovers' Bank. 


State Stock Bank, Logansport. 


Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank, Indianapolis 


State Stock Security Bank. 


Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank, Rensselaer. 


Steulien County Bank. 


Government Stock Bank. 


Traders' Bank, Terre Haute. 


Green County Bank. 


Upper Wabash Bank. 


Merchants' Bank of Lafayette. 


Wabash River Bank, .Jasper. 


Merchants' Bank, Springfield. 


Wabash River Bank, Newville. 


New York Stock Bank. 


Western Bank. 



Note. — Since Statement "E" was printed, the securities of Elkhart County Bank and Tippecanoa 
Bank, have been exhausted, and all the circulation, properly issued, has been once redeemed. 



APPENDIX. 



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248 



STATEMENT NO. Y. 

Shoirlrig the Heceqyts and Expenditures on account of Swamp 
Lands, for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1857, a7id the 
balance due each county at that date. 

NO. 1.— ADAMS COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 f!)13 35 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 188 06 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $7i;5 29 



NO. ii.— ALLEN COUNTY. 

Balance on hand. October 31, 1855 $3,514 79 

Paid out during the year $1 ,788 00 

Pro rata of general expenses of fund 1,498 SO 

3,286 89 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $227 99 



NO. 3.— BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $176 16 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 506 72 

$G82 88 
Pro rata of general expenses of fund 103 76 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $579 12 



NO. 4.— BENTON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $169 50 

Receipts during the year 7,011 05 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 643 59 

$8,424 14 

Paid out during the year $1,656 87 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 995 96 

2,052 83 

Balance on hand, October 31, 18.')7 $5,771 31 



NO. 5.— iiLACKFORD COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $105 54 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 143 30 

Overdrawn, October 31, 1857 $37 "6 



NO. 6.— BOONE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1850 $449 09 

Proceeds of »ale.s under act of 1851 H99 31 

$1,34!) 00 
Pro rata of general cxp'Mi.se of fund 069 53 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 .' $679 47 



249 

NO. 7— BROWN COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $1,001 04 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 978 60 



$1,979 64 

Paid out during the year $668 83 

Illegal sales refunded 931 01 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 279 74 



1,879 58 
Balance on hand, October 31, 1857. $100 06 



NO. 8.— CASS COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $393 73 

Eeceipts during the year 1,249 34 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 . . 539 35 



$2,182 42 



Paid out during the year $721 96 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 665 86 

1,387 82 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1S57 $794 60 



NO. 9.— CLAY COUNTY, 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $726 94 

Receipts during the year 544 22 



Paid out during the year $537 90 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 780 28 



81,271 16 
1,318 18 



Overdrawn, October 31, 1857 $47 02 



NO. 10.— CLINTON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $663 53 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 50 00 



Paid out during the y>:ar $197 20 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 172 87 



$713 53 



370 07 



Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $343 46 



NO. 11.— DAVIESS COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $17,297 06 

Receipts during the year C37 16 

$17,934 22 

Paid out during the year $1,611 10 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 2,716 48 

4,327 58 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $13,606 64 



NO. 12.— DECATUR COUNTY. 

Balance ou hand, October 31, 1856 «] 546 gg 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 100 00 

$1,646 98 
Pro rata of general e.xpense of fund , 1G4 69 

Balance on hand, October 31, lt^57 $1,482 29 



250 

NO. 13.— DEKALB COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1855 $2,898 75 

Paid out during the year $1,7P4 31 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 893 31 

2,677 62 



Balance on hand October 31, ISr-T $221 13 

NO. 14.— DELAWARE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $115 51 

Paid out durin'j; the year $45 00 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 24 60 

69 60 



Balance on hand, October 31, 1S37 $45 91 

NO. 15.— DUBOIS COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 185S $672 05 

Receipts during the year 1,800 00 

$2,472 05 

Paid out during the year - $860 83 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 1,156 72 

i $2,017 55 



Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $454 50 

NO. 16.— ELKHART COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $120 61 

Proceeds of sales underact of 1851 2 00 00 

$320 61 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 655 32 

Overdrawn, October 31, 1857 $334 71 



NO. 17.— FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $188 28 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 39 64 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $148 64 

NO. 18.— FULTON COUNTY. 

Receipts during the year $1,176 77 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 1,170 25 

$2,347 02 

Overdrawn, October 31, 1856 ^i^^ fi 

Paid out during the year 766 77 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 2,659 82 

3,867 06 

Overdrawn, October 31, 1857 $1,520 04 



NO. 19 —GIBSON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1853 $5,398 84 

Receipts during the year . 14,3.0 00 

$19,768 84 

Paid out during the year $14,349 99 

Pro rata of gerieral expense of fund 3,448 77 

17,798 76 



Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $1,970 08 



251 

NO. 20— GRANT COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $4,P<)7 77 

Proceeds of snles under act of 1851 2,513 02 

$7 401 39 

Paid out during the year $ 1,624 13 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 1,087 52 

2,711 65 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $4,689 74 

NO. 21.— GREENE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $7,657 43 

Pveceipts during the year 50 00 

$:,707 43 

Paid out during the year .$5,161 40 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 2,345 80 

7,507 20 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $-2m 23 



NO. 22.— HANCOCK COUNTY. 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1856 $140 19 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 16 99 

Balance on hand, October 31, 1857 $123 20 

NO. 23.— HOWARD COUNTY. 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 1851 $2,609 29 

Overdrawn October 31, 1856 $349 85 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 454 58 

804 43 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $1,804 86 

NO. 24.— HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $31] 39 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 33 33 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $278 06 

NO. 25.— JACKSON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $G 477 06 

Receipts duriug the year s'sil 58 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 1851 4,164 21 

$15,992 85 

Paid out during the year $5,238 89 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 2,520 58 

7,759 47 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $g 033 33 

NO. 26.— JASPER COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856, $3,695 33 

Receipts during the year 148,947 25 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 1851 1,668 90 

$154,311 48 

Paid out during the year $1.56,181 92 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 22,449 13 

178,631 05 

Overdrawn October 31, 1857 $24 319 57 



252 

NO. 27.— JAY COUNTY. 

BiUacceon hand Octol^er 31, 1856 $1,598 76 

Proceeds of Siiles under Act of 1-^51 50 00 

$1,648 76 

Pro i-ata of general esi eiisc of fviud 184 13 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $1.464 63 

NO. 28.— JENNINGS COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October SI, 1856 $804 23 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 183 1 110 00 

« $914 23 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 91 42 

B^ance on hand October 31, 18.57 $822 81 

NO. 29.— JOHNSON COUNTY. 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 1851 $142 87 

Pro rata of general exjiense of fund 14 28 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $128 59 

NO. 30.— KNOX COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31 , 1856 $6,194 37 

Receipts dming the year 4,839 60 

$11,033 97 

Paid out during the year $1,277 68 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 1,306 07 

^ 2,583 75 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $8,150 22 



NO. 31.— KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $6,497 80 

Receipts durin ,' the year 2,406 24 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 1851 1.510 59 

$10,414 63 

Paid out during the year $5,951 80 

Pro rata of geueral expense of fund 2,295 54 

8,247 34 

Balance on hand October 31, 1857 $2,167 29 



NO. 32— LAGRANGE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $826 31 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 860 82 

Overdrawn October 31, 1857 $34 51 

NO. 33.— LAKE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $25,262 00 

Receipts during the year 44,256 95 

Proceeds of sales under Act of 1851 5,593 15 

$75,112 10 

Paid out during the year $42,017 04 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 11,970 15 

54,587 19 

Balance on hand October 31 , 1H57 $20,524 91 



253 

NO. 3-1.— LAPORTE COUNTY. 

Balanced hand OctoVer 31, 1856 $3,1()1 17 

Receipts durinc; tlie ye;vr 67,285 49 

T'roceeds of s:\le9 under Act of l^St 4,349 45 

$74,790 11 

Vai'l out durin? th<" yertv $G2,41t 16 

I'ro rata of sjer.eial expense of fund l(l,'JSi8 62 

72,642 78 

Balance on hand October 31, 18.57 $2,153 33 



NO. M— LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand October 31, 1856 $479 50 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 55 00 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, lfi57 $424 50 



NO. SC..— MADISON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $409 65 

Receipts during the year 132 70 

Proceeds of sales under act of li^.'il 4,574 .'54 

.«j,117 09 

Paid cut during the year $2 05 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 697 78 

700 43 

Balance on hand Oct. 31. 1857 $4,416 66 



NO. 37.— MARION COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $58 05 

Pro raU of general expense of fund 8 34 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $49 71 



NO. 38.— MARSHALL COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct 31, 1850 $11,.520 98 

Receipts during the year 831 97 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 2,872 16 

$15,225 11 

Paid out during the year $8,703 82 

Prii rata of general expense of fund 4,59U 03 

13,293 85 

Balance on hand Oct 31, 1857 $931 26 

NO. 39.— MARTIN COUNTY. 

Receipts during the year $400 00 

Overdrawn Oct. 31, 1856 $103 44 

laid out during the year 5]j) 00 

Pro rati of general expense of fund H;5 24 

T87 68 

Overdrawn Oct. 31, 1857 $387 68 

NO. 40.— MIAMI COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $100 00 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 ]c)(j qq 

220 00 
Pro rata, of general expense of fund 22 00 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $198 00 

1 D. J.— 18. ^~ 



254 

NO. 41.— MONROR COUNTY. 

Balance on h;uid Oct. 31, JSoG S 103 37 

Receipts during the year 774 00 

Pi-oceeds of sales under act of 1851 (542 27 

1,519 64 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 277 11 

Balance on hand Oct. 31 , 1857 $ 1,242 53 



NO. 42.— MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $146 60 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 50 00 

196 60 
Pro rata of general expense of fund 19 86 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 §176 74 



NO. 43.— MORGAN COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 S41 92 

Proceetls of sales under act of 1851 218 44 

260 3t) 
Pro rata of general expense of fund 3!)9 22 

Overdrawn Oct. 31, 1857 $48 80 



NO. 44.— NOBLE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $3,927 24 

Paid out during the year $2,591 48 

Pro rata of general exi)euse of fund 89 -< 05 

3,489 53 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $'07 71 



NO. 45.— ORANGK COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 18.56 $225 95 

Receipts during the year 300 00 

525 95 

Paid out during the year S6 00 

Pro mla of general exp'^nse of fund 60 00 

66 00 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $459 95 



NO. 46.— OWKN COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1K56 .$85 0(1 

Receipts durin^' the year 508 88 

$593 H8 
Pro rat* of genenil exjiensc of fund 60 HH 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857.. ,$533 00 



255 



NO. 47.— PARKE COUNTY. 



Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $507 00 

Pro rata of general expense of fiind 53 79 

Balance n hand Oct. 31, 1857 $454 n 



NO. 48.— PERRY COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $378 72 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 46 18 

Balance on hand Oct. 31 , 1857 $332 54 



NO. 49.— PIKE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $1 209 73 

Receipts during the year 1 521 16 

S2 730 89 

Paid out during the year $1,277 23 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 1,274 63 

2,551 86 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 '. $179 03 

NO. 50.- PORTER COUNTY. * 

Balance on hand Oct. 31 , 1856 $14,249 79 

Receipts durin,^ the year 1,265 00 

Proceeds of sales underact of 1851 3,210 46 

$18,725 25 

Paid out during the yaer $1,295 46 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 4,722 56 

6.017 02 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 18.57 $12,708 23 

NO. 51.— POSEY COUMTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $743 42 

Receipts during the year 1,400 00 

,> .. J ^ $2,143 42 

Paid out during the year $1,570 20 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 463 20 

2,033 40 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $110 02 



NO. 52.— PULASKI COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 tjo 7^0 26 

Receipts during the year 23*316 79 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 4*488 46 

^ .. , . , $40,517 51 

Paid out dunng the year gop 946 27 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 10^218 76 

'■ .39,165 03 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $1,352 48 



256 ■ 

NO. 53.— RIPLEY COIINTV. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 ft4(3g 24 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1S51 '..'.'.'..'., 1 050 00 

Pro rata of general expense of fund '153 pQ 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $1,364 44 

NO. 54.— SCOTT COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31 , 185G ^] 266 97 

Pro rata of general expense of fund '217 ^2 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $1,049 15 

NO. 55.— SPENCER COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, IS'iC, 81.169 62 

{Receipts during the year 150 00 

$1,319 73 

Paid out during tlie year $3 00 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 712 61 

715 61 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $604 12 

• " NO. 56.— STARKE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 «8,475 89 

Receipts during the year , 19,653 88 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 722 94 

$28,852 71 

Paid out during the year $26,388 11 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 7,575 19 

33,963 30 

Overdrawn Oct. 31, 1857 $5^10_59 

NO. 57.— STEUBEN COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 185C $4,588 17 

Paid out during the year $595 46 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 1,U19 69 

1,615 15 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $1,973 02 

NO. 58.— ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $9,230 81 

Procecls of sales under act of 1851 1,683 40 

$10,914 21 

Paid out during the year $2,854 85 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 3,871 48 

6,726 33 

Balance oij h^ir.d Oct. 31, 18;)7 ,, $4,187 88 

NO. 59.— SULLIVAN COUNTV. 

Balance on hand Oci. 31. I8.>0 i^-\:^-:,r ^''~'^ ^ 

Paid out during th'.-y^ar......... *''7,i ;V. 

Prorataof general expense of fund _'^^ ''^ 2 gj3 ^ 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1H.'>7 $489 66 



257 

NO. 60.— TIPPEOANOK COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 S'^a 81 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 10 00 

Balance on hand Oct. 31 , 1857 $62 81 

NO. 61.— TIPTON COUNTY. 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 $7,733 63 

Overdrawn Oct 31, 1856 $498 47 

Paid out during the year 914 00 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 1 ,883 06 

3,295 ^3 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $4,438 10 



NO. 61.— VIGO COUNTY. 

Reliance on hand Oct. 31, IRoG $1,280 91 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 161 05 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 18.57 $1,119 86 



NO. 63.— WABASH COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 $134 50 

Pro rata of general expense of fund , 13 45 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $121 05 



NO. 64.— WARRICK COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1S56 $3,789 35 

Receipts during the jear 1,322 50 

$5,111 85 

Paid out during the year $113 30 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 636 57 

749 87 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $4,361 98 



NO. 65.— WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $1,571 02 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 132 00 

$1,703 68 

Paid out during the year $623 99 

Pro rata of general expense of fund 382 34 

1,006 33 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $697 35 



NO. 66.— WELLS COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1856..., $903 73 

Pro r.ita of general exjiense of fund 217 97 

Balance on hand Oct. 31,1857 $745 76 



258 

NO. 67— WHITE COUNTY. 

Balance on hand Oct. 31. 1856 $22,826 90 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 4,448 06 

$27,274 96 

Paid out during the year $2,969 31 

Pro rata of general exjjenso of fund 6,442 55 

9,411 86 



BsUance on hand Oct. 31, 1856 

Proceeds of sales under act of 1851 



Pro rata of general expense of fund. 
Ovwdrawn Oct. 31, 1857 .... 



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Balance on hand Oct. 31, 1857 $17,863 10 

NO. 68.— WHITLEYCOUNTY. 



$249 86 
100 00 


$349 86 
538 91 


$189 05 





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'T Ci -o o CO -J i^ ;=; i/^ ^ 1- r^ ::; o '-^ 3- -— c -v -. i - ^ »— i— ci -: i- at CO -C o oo co 

(^^'c^M cf o'r-ro ■^'co'jf r-Ti^ irf 'r x^crp-'-ir co x'^^'ir^'co'co'io'cTcrr^'''* .-Tj-' 

e^ r-. r- 



■'. t^ o 

= eo ci 

F-» LO r}< 
CJCOlO 



5D'»^aiOOlI0^10QO'^lO(OOOOC1000:OCCOOOOl.'OOr-^C-i 

■3i s( ^ "^ -^ LO CO o »o <s G* oi CO o 1^ o CO ^ ^ »-i CI :o c; c? 1^ i-n 'jo -^ vT 

"1< >0 rO ro r-' (^ O UO O C5 -M n- -H O to 00 rH = OC >iO 

O CC IC OfJ OO OS j - C; CO CC "T« lO CO CO KO w t^ O Ct Ci 
— (C^i-'VGICOCOr^CSwirOCfVCI'T^CIlQ'-^r-l 



CO 3< m LO CO o o o< 

UtOO-*!Of- 
"T tSC« I" 



J X' O Ut 00 T? !0 CO rl 




*j O 73 

C 'V " 

3 ^ 3 
— O ul 

ox 

Mi-1 






oo>.'Ouoo-i'Oxicoofo-HOi^ooooooi^oint^ooi-et'*o 
o-=)'^^ocoo5t^daortcs0'^r^;o;ioc^>io-^ci— ''-«i^i^i^i-to 

tN O u-5 O O -r -f CC -* C (- O OO X CO O 01 CO .-O => CI i~ 'H CI PO -O CO o o 

c» o c* LO ;:i CO ^ r3 o c^ OS X) CO uo ^ — -f CO (^ — • ^ 'O '-0 1-1 ijo o CO -T^ uo 

"^ LO Cj CO 0* «CO G* ^ Ot G< rr ■* ^ ^ rt CO r;t " r-t Gt CO 






; = o 



• « o a . a, 



i; - ^ 5. .i; 3 a i' o •_ D o ?- ;s -r :" r a " "i ?' — 

c 3 «i 2 b'S g 3 = o :i'-^ e- 5 rt = = rt .3 o o o o : 



h ■ S & rt 



3 S-J a 

,- iw =. t; V .- O O 3 3 



•nnmn ii •» w -n I- ^n o> o -" (5> M •* 15 <a (- cc c> o -- iji fo ■* « to I- X) cj o r; ff> CO ;J o » 
jaqiun)] I ri;rorocomcO'n"«'Vi<vr'9'^-rf>/ououoouO'''juouo'Ouoooo'^too<s 



261 



^ 00 5 



oooocooooo -ooocoocoooo 



(crooo'jc-ccQocccoifi 
OL' ■- 00 o en C( c> -n* I- ^r -^ lo o 

ic lO "^ cr u7 co^ 'Vot^e^^G^ 



<0 C* "^ O 00 CO «C i.» C* 00 CI I 

CO lO C3 ■^ tr: GO C: C. CO c» •-< 1 
^ 1 - i.O CI tn X ON " *^ '-' i- 

■^ t-;, i-^ -:;^ ol x^ CO a; >— > 1-^ ( ^ , 

; lo (ci^ ic u^ cJ CO Lo t-^ CO cr^r 



^ CI CI ct X r: tr T 
« c^ c* i^ o *— r; ^' 

e; 1-1 (^ o) 'i X = = 

»- L-: CI o X ^ cr- -»■ 


C) CI X CI M 

-. •.= (- X m 

Cl X ^ X cc 


c:ortOOii-'Mi^ci'-ico 
'a■■-^oc■. c: = c:t-.c-vo 

C-. — CXSrtr^l ^1.-5 1~ 

T i~ C ii 1- C. 1- M = X X 
o c: 12 c; CI ;^ ^ ti « C-. lO 


■^ CC X ^ lO c^ "^ 


■- e^ c^ c ^ 


X M X L-5 -"T ■^ -O — . C -H Oi 



ocow^r-oo-t*i-<t^coc^o 
Oi-^eococomc. ocicxc*'** 

C: CO iO> 11^ C:r iC CC C» C: O Tj« o t^ 

c.ci-^r-ic:;c:o*ipcocci-oo 

*- C^ O CI CO "^ l^ ^ 1- CO I- T-^ 



i-i 00 o <?t cr '-' CO Ci i-i c: lo 

COXOtCCTi-HtCCOOCOX 
I-' CO CJ O Ci CO t - t^ lO CI C". 
X O X O lO CI 1-- Cl 1-1 c< X 



noxooi-x^x — 
■<roio — wxmc-. oi 


§t:!§ 


Irt i- X i- CI 


05 t^ C 00 c» 
^a- 01 ;c ;i in 


CI 'i C-. CI o -^ — t~ C-. 
c< CI " ci m ■ ■ c^ " 


X m o 


.- C-. ■"T Cl 1.-3 
L-5X C-. I- C3 
C^ r-i X n O 


= lO CC lO o 



Oii-id'^cox»-ii-oco»— i-^i-OLo 

1^ CO O "V X i^ C> — '^ i- CO '^ "^ 

X"^xi-c^c". ■^c:0'.^'— no 

Oi-C^^-T-O'-'COCOi-CO'^ — 



oi o lo i-^ c» "t« c-i Tf ^ CO -^ 
i-i -^ I'- CO I— Lo CO c; o CO Gi 

Oc0i-ITJ<X'^XCO«0'^I> 
^ O C-' CM ^ t^ CO ^ ^- C) t^ 

■n'co-^xo: (--r-.— XCOCO 



C^CIC-^-^C^ CO^ClC-ftOi-i 



W5 Gl to CO C» C# l!0 O i-i --' I-" 



t-^Oi-Hf'^di-'OCOXOXO 

^ c o o X o c: CO c* X Cft^ (^ 

00(r>C:f:(XC;XX'-(COCOO 
'-'('l--XX'-^COi--X(NX'-^X 

irt ^ i-H CI "V «-! c* CI CI 



iiOt--Ot-^OC^i/5COCiTj<PO; 

to rH O '— O CI T-« w CI '^ i^ 

-^ CO -^ C. O i- '-0 r- cr. ^ o I 

-T i- >C CO CO''-' CO 1- CO 1- f-i ■ 
C;r-.Trr-ir-i COr-iCIC* 



X "^ O* t^ CO X C3 CO £- O LO C» {^ LO r~ Ci X O ^ — C» Oi O ■— I "^ 

c: CO cc r: CO i.o 1-0 I- cc -j:; Of c: o 'H' CO CO CO X t^ CO CO c: c *f CO 

CO-«rXCOCOCOCOCO'<riCC-COLO'^f-'^-«PCMOX.COXClCO'^ 



(OcDu^cicoT iOiCOiC'«ri-*cicicococococo'n^coococ*co 



-= o u c: 



5 5 u c 

E ~ ^■§ .S c ?^ P - 



i^oooo.-icico-^i.oot-xoc'-cicO'^inor-xciOi- 



(O <0 CO i^ t^ t~* I 



• t-i^^-t^i--xxxuuxxaoxooQocsci 



262 



^ 



C 

is 
<^ 






f^^ 



(tT t ~ Tj^ o -^ r-T cT eo~ -^ go" 



:o ^ -v (Wv t- r- CO 1^ o 

?D-^a;^r:xo — o {' 



■OOOCOulCO'^Oi-f-l'tDOTl'ClCTirtCOOiOlW 

" ■ * -3 au '-' ^ CMr: CO >r: c: ci CO 



c^wcoooooc;«aci w 



oc M' u^ «:; i' CI « <•- c^ oc' CO ^ C! CI c^ C-* o CO M c^ 
cT c^ cT to 10 -^ Lo tcT to -^ c*r » fo" ^ (>r cf ocT c^ cc" cl" iirT 



•r'^c*xinX'^CJ'-'to •cstot^ocoosio^h-Tfcococo*-^ — ocooico 






•-1 lo c: co"co cTtt cJc^co^i-Ti-^to CO X oi sToToc c< 



c»i-"ffr-ir5*-to'^foo 



•O(NCC0L-5C0Ctr-OC0rHO'*"^i-'C0C0O©»0l 



• C» -1* CO X — ' 00 00 -o CO 
M'^C^I-^ X^*';_C»_l^^'-;,tO 

ri-^Tp"to orco"to^cf cToT 
: o 1.0 1^ —I -^ <-• cs "^ o 



COiOf^Ct-^tOUOCJClCOO-^OiCO 

cf cfeO l^'O to oT c' 00 00 C3D oT to t-T 

^ G< «0 CO 00 00 01 1-. C^ '«p COC-iO 



O i-O 01 01 1-1 to 

" CO OS t^ a» o 



■<»• t^ 00 O 'Tf c» 
i-^ t» 00 00 CO 00 



iftTfi— tocs-^Goor^Oi 

^ "■ ■:; CO to 00 CO 'T CO 



Tr*oit^CTC^'^CNo:TPoooiOTj«'*j«ir5ir3 0ii>aioo 
to <•: >n CM- C5 L-^ 00 C( i/^ 00 c» v(0 1^ CO c* CN (- CO ex 

C^Ci C-> CO Ci O I— I _j CM- 05 Ci 00 -^ c; -^ -^ (- X" i'- 

^Gtaj -^ in '^^ ^ 6^ "V n co^i-^to^t^ o to o t-^o" 



1 












^ 










lO c:^ 0; G» tc c^ 


C-. « = 


OOi-OO — 
















































-r C-. CJ -"J" i~ 


O) — oc = 














ifl^'S 










t> 


» 








TO 


r- (N (N 


CQ --I 






Oi in a: cz ct "^ t-^ 


■ji in m 


-^totO'J'Ooomc^ 


mnnc-.t^ 


















Si 000 TT (J) 00 






CO ^ >- 








t^ 




























ct 


T)<5I- 


r- (M 


■fa. <M 


uf I-. n ^ 


iOCX-V 10 


'cnstm-vof^myf 


z 





















S=-S3-^c^g,^ 



.?; -f -^ « E= o ^ r, -p = -= 



> 1= S w 5 ^ S ?;. 



g-s 



o o -S 

^ 2 S j; B c >; 



*'M'""N 1 r- 1-1 i-l -^ -H -H .-1 i-l rH f-H 5> CI 4|(H CI CI i;* Cl <M Ot M « 



263 



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. tt) 0-. ■* ■* — — 

. Ci lO « C» ^ "^ 



. O^ G^ (T^ i ■;^ -^ IC -d^ 00 



, O CO ^^ O) 



. C5 C CQ CO lO 



• 00 ^ C^ Oi O ^ C-. r- m tT o 

'. cT\n i->^ ^ >o :^ S m f^7rS 
. i.T ^ ■^» r-, 10 -r- CI := -o M 



, CT. ^ CO ■» O 



00 •* t- 
CO t^ iri 



■ 00 = T-H 0« O 



, f-1 CI C< ■* Tl" 0( 



. i-O •* '51 00 -^ L- 00 00 t^ oc 



-^Ctni'^r-^tM'^' 



• o 00 a; to ff> 

• S» orj 00 ih -^ 



> o oo to J- I ' •— i^J )~ -^ CO o 

' rH 1-3 CO to t' rH »r ^ — lO 'JD 
' vn^CO C->^0_00 00 rH^O l-^Cn JO^ 

'. xi CO 1-o^co^i- I— I croT-^r- -r 

, C* -n- C-i Gl I - ^ CI CC <-< 



CO CO "-(M 00 

' c. o cr. 'o CO 

■ ■* 1.0 1- <- c 



, CO --- ^ CO c-* 



^ C~. TJ" -co 



.tao0'*aotoc3> .. _ _ _ 

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tceocooieO'-imocio 
>r^coc>cooor-cow^3:oo 

' CO^f-^^i-'^GJ^O CO ^^»-H Ci^co 

■^ cT -^ -^ c (^ -r Tf cT 'T otT 



O O ^ ■* OJ CO 

o I-' lr^ CO o i- 
c: c; »n lo CO c> 



C- ■* CO t^ — ' O rt CO f- ff> 
rf C* CO i^ CO O i^ (^ O (^ 
aOrJ<COGJOCOCO^Tl*rJ< 



i^ 1(0 — ' Ci Xj 
CO rM UO CO CO 



00 O CO CO 0» O lO X' -* t- rH 

00 CO ^ I ' CMO -T Ci CI CO CO 
-* X 'I" "O r^ CO -J- — I cr. CJ c. 



CO CI I- i- t - 

i~ 00 -q" oj o 

r— O ^ .XI -O 



« i^ o o o ^ 



" CO I— t CO "^ CI - 



i- i* CO liO -^ 1- CO 



CN Tj* lO CO CD 



I »0 >0 00 00 o^ 



■* C5 o o m CO 



ooc-^oi^muocMco^ 

lOCOI^OOXCO-^OCICO 



l^ Oi CI ^ t- CO i-i ri O »/0 



O O CO CO ■»• 
•*C0 CO C5CO 



oa X d o )(o 



co'^cO'Hi-tooiOiincico 
c:;; 00 Tf* ) - 1^ Oi i^ lo i-i CI Tji 

00 Ci^C Ol -^-^CI^OO C) CO CO 

i-T sr t-^ CO cToc CO CO cT -^ iio 
eo"n"a' = "'^cixQoi-iei 



— ' C<01 ■* CO 



UOCOIO 

o = to 
toio^eo 
of-*' to 



• 00 >fl CO O 05 ^ 

• O O 1~ lO -T ■* 

• Cl_00 lO^Cl^lO oo 

'. co'oc r^x'o"'^ 



UOCOOCiOXtMnOCOCJ 
CO £^ CO 05 i-t Tf CC I.O CO -^ 



CO •* CO CI TT to CI CO C: 00 



X 00 r-1 rjo CO 
CO lO CO rH^iO__ 

o'otTo co^irT 



t- in O C- CI -O CI C35 -J* -* 00 



; -»■ CO CO CO c I- 



t^ O lO to LO 

CO —■ CO r-l CO 
« lO =,C0 !■;_ 



C» d CO --^ O: CO 

>0 CO CO X (- CO 

eoioc-^ci^x^i-;^ 

C) xTco'ci -^o 

" to = >o <~ ■-1 
-H r-1 Ct C< 1-1 CI 



— CO X CO t^ 1^ X »0 -1« i-H 

CO 0-. " I— JO t CO -* lO s 
1-", •-<__ C-^ Cl^ 1-^ O-^ CO X_^ 1-^ -H_ 

x'^fcfoo co'otTio i-^i-^oT 
lo ^ -c:' c* --^ X CO CI CO rH 
"CO CI -r c! o fH 



O CO CO CO 1/0 
t' Ci X lO C5 



_ CO F- — 1 to 
X O -O = CI 
C! r- CJ r-, .-( 



to CI -r CI CO i~ —1 CO CO -r CO 

" CI '-' CO X CV lO lO -* CI o 

to^rr^ci^-a; -v'-'' ^-^^ -^'^I. 
cTx cr-i^ lo^crco'io x'co'" 

~ — " C( iDl^ to I- r- LO 
CO C^ CO CI '-' o* 



CO to 1^ " r 



a[^ y: z:- <o i!^ 



•- Ci no ^1 c: CI 



CI CO 1" UO CO f 



«— jcOioCiCO--t*C?-1*iO 

OixCJOVCTiCOCOXCOlO 
irt^CO C) OO 'crtO^X TT^iO co^ 

cfio uoco'i-T -^oTcT 



ocooieoioc<cocoxr"CO 



irj . CO to W* <— I CO • ot; tj 05 CO lO C< CO CO JU --■ c^ . V* ^* Wi I-- i^ 
O 'i-lCSX— ^CO '(-lOCICnxCOc^OO^CId ."Cl^^CO 

cf ." -i""cr-i''crcJ' .' "" -rto'''o'i^'"-- x'co' -r ; -i<"'- coi-^ i-< 



^ &s-= 



bt) a 



qj y fl 






n: d cfl 






COii?H£^iiii»H(iS^aiM cS'-Ti M -yi >-^ !» Ji H ti 



e«eoT»<iotof-xoo>-<c»eo'»'uocoi^xoJ = — 
cocococococococO'^-^-i'-rr)''r-*-*-?'-<^LO»-o 



C'CO ■* lO to i 



.CiOr-^C'CO-^iOOt-XCiO^CICO-l-tOtOi-OOClO 



lO ».0 10 liO LO lO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO c 



• t~ I- 1- 00 



264 



oc 





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rl lf5 =. LT OJ 








































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<^ I- O • C O CO l^ o 

' " " " ^ni-^ 

i-ir-i ci 



jt o « . c: ic irt F^ o 



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O XJ C* VO C". 



(^ C-. O --i c> 
I^ i~ IC — Oi 
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:S ? «2t: O 






•wquinii ; s 



am-t-i/ioi-xiCJ^f- 



265 



CO 



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e; 






f^ 






o o to »-t c-» 10 CO i-'t «-* o 
i'OO^mC'*'— 'Oioioc-i 
CO o CD to 10 i-jirt^o: c t^ 

W C^ i^ C* 1— I "^ C» i- ^ CO 



oi"^ 00 cor- CO 0001^ 

CC -3* C* Ci ^ 1-5 i^ CD lO O 
C-* O i-- .-1 <-< C( CO 



•"tClCOOCOCOlCClTPCJ 

CJ'Q<OCiC0<-(-viXiC:G0 

o o 'T* o) OifC^ zi 



C0l^J-'V'«rO3t0l--C0 



CO 00 CO L*: >-< ci 0:1 c^ CI •- 1 



O C: 00 t^ I-" O CN -^ CO i- 
(^ 1; I- ^ o t- -— o c* c» 

cT-^cTo ^rco oTi-Hi-f i-*" 

Oi-OOftOCOGCiOCO-^ 



CO'Vint'-COCOt^cOOO 
O01wC0C0i--00^00O 
I— 11— iC. cod-— 'lOOOUf?' 

ir3LO00co'^c:cococ:<- 
cooc.»-o ^xcoi---rGc 



t-* CO r- Ci (?» i> CO •— CO 

^^ ^ i-, f^ ^ r-i .-. G* 1— 1 O 

o oq_ i-o^ co_ uo_ x^ :r_ 00 CO Ti^ 
Tt to" i— co" r-T "-T Qc" -H o~ t -^ 

CO CO O C-l C- CO CO »0 X) 



:C»COOeOCO'VCOQOQtjCi ODi-n—COi-COOffJ^Utl^ 
>OCO»nC:u-j = uL4'-^CI — CiCO — '^i-i'^iOiOOCO 

re* -f "^cs CO i-^crx ITS oT 1/3 ctTi-Tc: Qo (Vcrt'^cTx'otr 

: C/ CO I-. O 10 *" ^ "^ ^ I- OU F-* O X uo CO CO 3 o cv 



0*lOCOC*XCOr-"<1«t03pC*CJOOC: (MlOOlOiO^ 



^ GO iJ X eo CO CO CJ c; e* -J 



—tin ri ^ --" i-i 



^COCNC-fClCO'^'^'Vft* 
CO '— ' C". ^ i/i o 



CO O CO C» -^ i.-? Cl t^ -^ TP CO CO 1"^ C» LO -^ i- »-< o to »-< CO 
1-1 10 —' CO CO X Ci Tf i- -^ 1-, O 01 C( *> to C) "-^ CO t-- ^ X 
C^X CO CJL^CO CO^CO Ci ■'J;,C*^OJ<0 i-;X CO -r !M i* ^^ CO i-n 

crt-^«-^ ^ CO ci c5 CO*^ i-T r-T r^- ui r-T ^4" 



o CO ^ r-. Ci CO i - cj CO o L- c» CO c. o c) =r CO i-o r 10 i ~ 

C* G< C» l^ X X Cjt "^ >— ' CO O J^ C< OL' t- C> lO Cp w. C* C} GO 

Lo '3-^irrx^Tp"x*"r'rco^/-'"o' co"cJ^ cT c:'cc o co '^ro-rcTor-.,'* 

CO w^ Oi CI i- ^ c. ^ ^ ^ — . (^ CO LO CO ^ Ci r: T Of -J- 1' 



O-^CSCO — COXCOG*Tt*CIt^LOr-C»XOiO-rt<C»0 
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CO Of CO L-^ o; c: CI — -^ 01 '-' CO X CI o ■— > "^ -^ •?- L-: r^. CO 

0'-'COCIt^>-'TrC*'VcO-ncOt^^01CQi-i-iOC*C c> 



'^c>c>i-i^o>cocO'^^ro*--f-LOco'^cociO-T 

J- X O O '^ X *■- CO I - Cf C: C-. CO C: CO 01 (- =;■ CO O 
O Cj C* -T CO X CO Tj- I-- -ri LO T ^ C. C i- CO X CO CO ^ 



r- "^ c> c> 1-1 c; c 

CO -^co X CO o ut *^ (•- n' CO ui •-« o: ~ ^ tt'c: c: co O • 



; CO CO CO c: CO X CO I 



? c; r^ X — — X CO 1- CO £ ^, 



°c 2^ ' - 2 ^- ^ •'^ 0^ "^ - ^ f^' "^ 3 »"- *' o t^ o CO c( CO 

" o X CI o CO c. m cj r; 'O o 1 - c* o 'J" CO ^ =r o CO I-, 
■^cj c-^co CO x^'rr^x^«oco^^c»_io CO co-voc»cooi7?oo 
■v c) c» — ::f TC (-^o^(^ crri-f c^rH cr^x'crTt^-r oo^i^o* 

t~-coi-Trc:coco'<j«iOC--rHCico^o«xco^'a-Oi-- 

^ r-ir-l F- C<— C<r-l,-^rt ^^^„Qj 




-jaqiQnfj 



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r.i^,-,,^rHr-«r-»^r-«^C^C»C< 5*C<CJ!C*OJC*CICOCOr:< 



266 



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tOQO l> C* to CO 
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CO (o CI I'- c^^ r* 



■* Qo '^ ■* CO r- 

; TT CO -^ 00 Ci 



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^- m o> c; '-' in 

C^CO OO^Cl^iq GJ^ 

-^ — 1 ■^ Tj* r^ c: 



t^ O ■«*< '^ Tji lO 
l^ CJ CN CO C^ LO 



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00 Ci a; -^ <-• * - 
O C5 c-u- O CO 
c:#_co^o «3 lO^c--^ 
00 r-TotCcT'^ 

UO 00 G^ i-t . - CI 



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r-i C* C< 



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MO CO C* liO O r-. C-f -^ X' 
iTr«30X'VXtOCO""' 



I^OQ0O00Tf*i>'«**t-^O 

c<toy3Tt<'-''^oo'^*^co 

CO Oi Oi^QO^tO CO OU IfS CO O 



0DOf-C*Clt-C0COTfrt< 



m-*t*co'<^i-Haif-HOioco 
i-- m G-* o CO >-« T-t o oc 1-1 



U000C0t^Ot^'*J^^C#O 



CiOc*csoi^vr:Oiooo 

O — OCOCOCOOO'^OlOO 

CO c^ Q0_ 00^ CO CO o^ irs^ C J, lO^ 
o o o" cT Qtr oo~ co~ t-^ o" T-T 

CI 00 O CO f- lO CO C* 00 i-- 
CiCOCOOOC*'-'^"^'-' 



r-iTj<OCOr-iOC»(^CO^- 

CO i^pH cj^to^o ocj^o o 

croo~r-Tc'"cru*"-irr-ro5 fo" 

i--toto^c»aoc*uococ* 

CI '^ C* r- 1 r-* 



t^'^i'r^i-itomLoaioco 
^ i~^ lo i-^ cj CO o in o CO 

00^ CO_ to C ^ CJ__ 1 -^ r-^ CO^ in_ 00^ 

cT CO c5" to o oc c^ 00 cT ocT 
00 to «3 in 1^ oj c» in ■*)* c^ 

C( rid -^11 



r Sj g| fl-:^ tprf 6 
i S'bl i-i a i E^-i Irf^ § i rt-iS o o o 



c= s S ^ t^ 



o GO OS r^ in 

CO d '-I to c< 



S ::;:::' 



Oi CO coco c^ 
1-- 1- o «; 1-1 

CO CT_r^ 0)^00^ 
C-* t^ i-H CO U5 
■^ CO O {?* CO 



f-ICOrtOO^ 
CO 00 00 1-1 c« 



r-100 t~ (N<0 
l» c o to CJ< 

IN OT r^!0 OJ^ 
oTlflCO' r-T 



•«^ Tj- OS t^ QC 
C- O Oi t^ 00 



'f c ooo c* 



OO (?t O C) (^ 



CO en (Mco 



COOOOC* 'J" 

ooco mi-iOJ 



O 00 lO -^ o 



^ • ^° a : 
3 .2 g « 1 



3 o o 3 9 



« >0 to f' CO Ci O 1-t r?» CO -^ Irt to '^ 00 05 O 1-t C» CO M* Ift to ^^ GO c 

;cocor^coco'*'^'^'<''^'r#^<«'^-^WiO»0»Oioii4rt»/>iftiu 



» CO -(i into 
> to to too 



267 



io i- 1- o o; o x- 



rt c; cc Ci 00 »- cc t 

Cl lO t— 'y -— O CC ' 
»— "n" ic C( CO (13 cc 1 



-i- C* C: -— M iC 



"^ c o o C-; 
n o: "-i 00 "^ o; 
Ci ffO o -r o ^ 
00 f^O '^O •-* 



lo o: "-i 00 "^ Ci . CO o -^ 






S -^ ^ ir5 Ci t^ . CC »-< CO 

( C> Gi w *- O . :_ '^ f- 

;^r^::^co^o ic • co c* r-<^ 

r-t~ao T-^o «? ; crj 1-^ oc" 

i o: (>» CO Tf . CO XI -^ 



•rf C> to Oi ro 
CO — ' Ci lO UD 
O CO^O C^ GO 

-i""ao ct <^co 



t- .— Ol o -^ 
C Oi ^ CO Ci 

O CO XI -^ CO 



^'1 



r ^o 1— > o CO oc CJ CO 
i c ic 1- i- - 
; -TT X c* c< 



iC 1- i- "^ t- X 



C0OC-. (Ninto .co'—i- 



C» O O CO ^ 

c. ■^ »-' »n (M 



CO »-« 



X(?^»OC0^»rM3ii- 

I'- .-I to lO C X <— o 
COXt?*"^COt- r-^ 



x-^j—ocoo .t^XtO 
00 oD_co o_"^ • *';,'* "^ 



ir; '— fft o LO 

CO CO UO 00 Ci 



c» c^ 1-- c* "^ »jo c; X 



■^ oi o ir: lO »o CO 



I- CO l^' «C CO X O". IC — ' 

■^CO OO^W^OJ^i.-^ • OO^C*^"^ 

i-i ini^ no t^ oi . 00 c» o 

C^ C* r^ . r^ ^ I-. 



X lO *^ Ct iC 

C-. ^ X -- o 

T— TT 0# X CO 



uoco irt"^ -^ 



c^fNi:*ooi-«^«;x 

i;OOc;(?*X=;C0 

CJ, 0_ CO C:^ I ^ au_ r-i_ r-^ 

o to to c>o t- £- ocT 

IrtTT'TCOl^'^i— lO 

uo c* CO f-1 lo to "^ 



o~00'«"^L0in * ^OQO 



lO Tp tj;-. 1^5 CO 

co^i-^i- cTcT 

iC — C> X X 

CO O C* ^ rH 



XX<Nt^C50it^O 

in <-i ■f o c* C-* t^ to 

00 lo c-*_o; o_t- ci_»(0 

t^uO C^O QC X CO i-^ 
i-^O CO ■<*' 1- '^ lO 
ri CO r- C* 



to cox O CJ ■«* 

iC — X i/^ Ci C* 
'tf iiO^ lO X "T^ Ci 

irTto oT 



X CO C^ ( 
O CO ~ ' 
CO Ot 



O CO uOX <;o 



to -1* . I- i-O ' 



X o 'tf -r i-^ 



t- X <M t- to i- X C* 

tOOTPOX^"^ — 

c-i X CO n* o o lo 



O ^ 1^5 O Cfc i- . O --« CO 
C: C-. -O to *- O . C. i - CO 

ct c~. _ '** iio 1- • a- •— CI. 



GO X O '^ iiO 



3 o 



i -S* S 5 X aiS w ii s 'S .&.& c § i; .^c rt « rt =5 rt ^'^ ^ x: 



r^ 00 c; o ^ c> CO -^ lo to r-- X w- o I— c< CO -^ to '^j 1^ GO 31 ci ^ 



I' I' t-«' t^ i 



t- i~ X X X X X X X 30 OO X c; C 



268 



t> 

C 









•^ 









'>. 






1 Oi r^ 



to cc rt c: cr. I ^ n c: -^ ic 

i-, !X> w '— -r oc --I 'X' rM -^ 



^ CM^ eo ?^ OC I- CO !•- oc 



-r c: '^ 



GCOO O 

•^ t-i 1-. 



X "^ c* fc trj o o m CO vn 



X « O « C£) 'I* X to t- (^ 



X <r> t- T— i-t i- C< O -V CO 






u?C0irtOC*5C0u^»0Xe0Ot-C0i-He0t^00OOO»»0-^ 

C0r-iCOi-iC0C»C»O»'*Tfr-'p-iC^C>*'^G-(C0c*C0G-*C<P0 



xi-coc- ■<i*'*c>x'*f'^f-ico<N-j*c*oir50<-ioi'-t-H 

»•? CO CO 3» CK>( i- '-' ^ O lO -T"^ C3 cr. O G* X <-< 05 (N in 

sL^a* "^ C'*^'— ^'-2_l^^'--^O^i-^i-n LO UO^C*:^CO_«- i-;^X^>JO OJ^i-^r-j^ 

r-'-^'fo r'co'co crcfirr-^'T^'r-^'crcfco'cr-^C'rco'co i:?rco 



t" r-Ti-J-^J-'co" 



i-^ooirtCTj^cDcoo^roiocit^o 
X O t^ ~ •-« c: irj r-i CO O CO *-^ «D -^ 

0>^ r-i ^ CO O C^ O r-^C» "^ — , ■"* 

CO*" 1-^ -^ co' 



C-J p-^ i;^ Tf X u^ CO *;- 
CO:00"^«3COC'CO 
CO «3 CO f-« Cv i.'l «0 



(sc-ciincoooco 

to Oi CO O t- CO CO (^ 



o t>. r- r- cj to oi 

lO — »/5 « w iO c?* 

i-i_rH_C^ QO^CO '^ CO 



O O C3 r-t CJ <-» lO 
CC CO -"T f^ X >-l X 
lO CO lO CO X -^ 



I- C» Tj« X X CO CO 

O 1/5 -^ r- 3 
C^ X" X 



O T}< CO 0» CO X Ifl 



CMiO LO X '-' CO O O O I^ X CO O; CO (?» OJ tM- CO S lO ■^ 



■*i.ocD*^cr. r-'*^ :;^cocO' 



G^ 10 I- t^ i- O) f-i 



^ CM G-> c: Tj* ■<?■ c» CO »- X CO o CO ^ 1.0 1- X CO -t- »io -^ X 



-- lO "^ 'JO 1-t C< I 



' 'T' CM ' CO lO C( X 'O CO UO CO C* CO CO X 
C^ r^ i-H G4 



'-iiot-^o-^^coc-^cotoi-irsCixt^ciooicocoaji^ 
'j*j^xcixxi~-i-(-xocixo"^ciiOr^cocnioo 
r* c". i-o CO c~ cr. Tt- CO X 1- CO ^ X •'9' CO «- X CO CO i^ o o 



c^ 



- TS q ^ O C 






la 



•J3quin(4 



!■<e«aKaoouocjoOQPOOo«^i.fc.f^faf^csooaflMKHH 

— mr-t-,— — .r--.-.-rt(;(Ol4|iHC/0}0<C<OIO<CO«C5rt 



269 



I- O Cl O X rt 

(N rH o po o: m 

" CO O) >^ CO C5 



O 0< C) OC QO i-i 

IQ •!• -^ O ■-< C» 



to M 00 O ■* l~ 

L-^ T-^ ^ M C> lO 

c;_t- CI ffl ■* ci^ 
to" <^^ i-i" 



»nC5 .MC>'-^O0 5»tDCO 
. O^CO lO^CO to i-;_tO^ 

•<^to I lo ©roc in cc *^ t^ 

— ,r-im<Mr-l(J<Mr1 



. O C5 O) 1^ O -* M 
I^ O !-• to ^ o c^ 



000Ct^tOMlO(N"0D(N 
C^-^tOlOOCSOC^OTO 



O ^n -H r-1 



1^ 05 M CO 



r-< •* X to 00 

o lo I— 00 a» 



. H 00 CO ■-I O -K 

; CO i^ to 1^ to o o CQ 



C> i-l CO Ol <N CI r-l rl lO •* 



t^ClOOCOtO-^QOOOtorHi-l 
C-. 0-. X X C» to t — - 



Oitomcidccocicooci 

p j^ r^ i^ Cl to to TO X CO -^ 
l^^C* C0^»O ^1 C5 l^ c* 



O w CO O O i-( 
CI o to ^ to CO 



-O" 1-1 C» CO 0< 



00 CO X oo -^ ct 
CI O m t^ I* 1^ 
to »0^i»^t^ to Oi 
■•3<'i-10r CJr-T 



(^ -^ O in ■»** (^ 

05 to I- i-H XI CO 
^ C( -^ LO CI 



Ttixr-c9<c»>ococ»c;x 
i-H c c) i~ X >n to 1-^ CI ■* 

COCOCOi-HTflO CIXCO 



to Ol 1^ i^ to 



XXlCCIO^HtOQOOtOr-1 

r-;tocococ^cococ*co cs 



O t~ OOiOiH 

■^ X >n c*m m 



C5 O CO O to t^ 

c o oxm tp 

1— I CO ^^ "'f -^ 



^orociw*cotoi-i 

■^OOCIOXXTJICOX 



C»i)< 

in CO 

■q"__l-H_ 



i-H X (~ o: o t^ 

CO C: CO CI CO 1-^ 



o CO •* en 1-1 ■* 
-H = CO to CI w 



co-^j'OiJ^t^oo-^'rteox 

t^ t- l^ T^ O O O CI to to 






X »— ' to ^ »n cs 

to "^ CD ^ i^ tz: 
CO C?^i-I "^CO^^ 
Co"^ CO"^ CO O 



cc^c>cif-"niH'«t<mco 

CO O to t- CO CI CI CD C< X 
O Oi 05 CO TJi L-^CO CO X CI 



O O OS CS 1-t 
O X C) C< CI 



CO LO in c» CO 



r-itOOXCOtOOOXOCl 



O— 1 O CJ 

^- ^i- oxo — 

x_^i-^to c^co to c» 1^ in ^ 

cT o" CO -^ in co" cT cT «K r^"~ x" 



3J ^ OS inx m 

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c-^Lo o CO in CI 
intgt'-''rtco'cJ" 



O X O C» CI to 

ci_rHto ;o__c>_to_ 
in cTco^-^x^in' 



COtOin-^rHlOOt-XX 

CI »n X o o in to o m X 
f-H^to^in^in ci^ci co^^^to -^ 
in rn' cf cf in o -^ -T CO to" 



X O -ti OICO 

i^ ctj f cr. i- 

Oo_i-. i, rt_^rH 

■>r i-'t--"x"-*" 



toininO'ij^"<**t^intDc»o 



OC|r^XO£^CI(NinC0CI 



1-1 m ■* to o c< 

o in to CO X o 

rH_ CO^tO_O^O^C» 

crT!;"o"cf-^"in 

i-l CO I— I i-l 



60 3 
c8'^ in 

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go 
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a ^ M t, ^ 



J g a g S ^; O O O Ph PM Ps (l( Pk ft A< rt « P3 la S M M c 



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r S-'S S S 



•vintot^xoO'-iCirO'i*intoi:-x^c>»-ic?cO'^incot^xoot-(c*cO'^incDt^Qooioi-((M«iTHirteoi^fYifl5o.-^/*« 
r3cococococo-ij<Tt.Tr'f-trri<^TrTrTrininininininwoinincD(oScoSSS£SS°?-?2"?.t3St^tSSSooS 

1 D. J.— 19 



^ 

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270 



ITS O Ift . O Cs Ol cc c> 



oo 



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CC rt» . LT -V -^ CC O 






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OOOUOUCUOOCOCCjOlO 



271 



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=.= -^^i-S « '^" J^ '= 3 § § ,-r ? i^ L^ ? g ^ § § 



rtS "^ '•■' Kco oi'sri/j"^. 



nt-ootoooco'^o — ifl 

O X^L-^iO^f-^^ ^ O 1^ l^ 

21 ■v ^ at'^ t^nuiinco 



:§Sgi2i?ss.-§3giii3iS|i2§SS 



S ?2 2 S! " =■• ^ ^ " 



i< - ■ v~ =i'-u'-^" =' ot » o S b = oc C^ ^ S :* r"= 









^ -~- *^ i-^C^C^ ,_, u-5 f-l ;— , 




coooxxooSkS 

irs'M o'cfoi l--"oo"to'(^ 






t^ocioxoioncc 

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"^ " " '^ " " o« =< « c« <?» c =t c< S o» ° « ^ S 



272 



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:o O O i^ T-t c^ 00 CJ O L-^ 



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O =1 

o2 



in o •* to •* m 
o CO c: «^ oi t^ 



m CD C^ t^ CO in rH rH 00 op 'O •COCOCOWO • TJH m OJ 



cTi-T co~ -T 



(M C< : rl 



C O O "-lO ■"! 

o o Ti^ in — * o 
in cn^C) oc^CJ <N 
rAoo cTo t>^ 



lo ic Tj« t^ ^} r^ OS »n to in 
oot^c^*Olni^r^ocmco 

CO o o_cs_(>) i--_to oo_>n ^_^ 
i-Tco r-Tco'co'in" co'r-Tto" 



CO 1-1 c t^eo 
rt X CO in in 




•* •* in in -v c< 



(?> i^ (N Tf t^ in CO 



•*-*inin-vcN -ost^ -(jti^tNTft^inco 

o -jD CO t^ C( OS . m OS . w; c* c> TT t^ c: 00 

to in oo^cj^i"-^'^ • "-^ * ^^^""..^^ "^^^ '^i 

rH"t-rco~in"to"irr I Tji" t '^o^Tjr^i^cTtD 



too i-it^ e» 
i~ o» o i^ (J» 
00 l^ i- rl o 



t^ I— O t~ (NOO 

in (^» to Lo c» in 



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to 00 CO -^ to in cj 

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■ m 


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a . 



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to CO OS 00 oc in to 

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o 


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to 


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•jsMimniJ aaiSI;2iS2^:53?23:^<e'~9e''>«l-'c^•c01l'ln!Ol-ooosOl-lO)co^ln!o 

^vptfuiii^ I oortnc^iocof^'ij'^'^^^'^-^-^rinminin'ninininminxicotototocoto 



273 






• in 05 iH r~ t^ 25 

• CD (?♦ t^ 05 o o 

• o ot o o» O 00 



C<"c< * CI 05 (O 



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• "^^^^^"^^ 

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»-» Qc CD c* o c» in M 



• 05 CO O O 00 t^ 

• cc in o o c; to 



• 00 !O00 OC5 

• :c f^ 00 in Oi 



»-tcsxoc5«i-'in ■fMin'-^c:t^M 
^^oc2oor?c5t^co •0'-^in'^o»o 

o'crrH in oT l icon en c<" ; i-To en 



o>— in-— oio .tnc-^ 



en en ■* 
tn o ^ 
ci m en 



• in en c^ -^ ci 

• &» T-H -f ■^5' -^ 

• '""..'^'^'^„'^ 

: r-i'o i-Ti-Tof 



gto a G> ^ rs Oi -^ -ooininooo 'encsc^ 

c* t' o X — --^ o . m (- en o o -^ • x -^ o 

en x_^en x_^c»_in__m r-^ . o c to ci^Ln__r-<_ -o^o^in^ 

t c en encfen en :t-"x'in^ 



en x_^en x_^c»^i _^ 
■-T TT 'T c^ !o' o" 



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, in to t^ *<*♦ Tt- 

: cr in -"j"^ ■*(!»" 



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• o o en 
lo'enx^co ■^■^'" cT I in oT .' r-Tcf i-T 



. o ■* . en X r^ in (N 

. "•T Ln . in ci c» X X 

• x^(>»^ • Oi^in^o^i-^r^ 

.' to (N : cfo'en cf 



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CI o -v en to c* c; X 
00 en c:^ r-^ to c 1^ r-^ o_ 
en "^ t -' rT Qo" to to^ c^ 



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'■ X_^>- C(_ 

; to o~cr 



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. tr^x_,m__x;^05 

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f- o o m i- c t^ en 


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X o m 

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en d c» <^ o 
X o m St C( 


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en o 


ri cir^ 




tox 


ot «B m m ct 



X c-t CI Ci •n* i^ OS m . i^ m c» to en OS 

to 1— X 05^05^00^1^ rH . cn^ ci^m^'^x^ 

cn'»r"m'-*'r-'to ; cTcTo'to'cn oT 

'-' 1-1 «l r^ r-l . (H 



di 03 t 



C)l^ 

_ _ m to 

Cl^Si ^"^ 

i-'t^ eneT 



t^moomoci-^ 

X to C5 X O (-» 1— ■»> 
t^ -r X CM' X ^^ to 



meni^cmcoen-« 
CO to CI m X to 
c< en m ci c« 



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f- to ^ ^ CI 
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r^xcso^CTcnTt-mtoe^xoio— icien-vrntot^xosorH 



to » to t^ i» i^ 



-t^t^i^xxxxxcsxxxxo-. O! 



274 



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INDEX 



Paob. 

General receipts 4 

Total receipts 6 

General expenditures 7 

Ordinary expenditures 7 

Miscellaneous expenditures 9 

Total expenditm-es lU 

State of the Treasury 10 

University fund 10 

Saline fund 11 

Bank tax fund iSl 

County seminary fund derived from militia fines 13 

Surplus revenue fund 13 

Congressional township fund 14 

Three per cent, fund 14 

Common school fund derived from sinking fund 15 

Indianapolis fund 15 

Treasury fund 15 

Fund from estates without heirs 15 

Asylum for the Blind 16 

Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb 16 

Hospital for the Insane 16 

State Prison 17 

Common school fund derived from current taxes and interest upon trust funds 18 

Swamp land fund 18 

Remarks upon the swamp land fund 19 

Apportionment of swamp land fund 20 

State debt — its present condition 22 

Interest on State debt 23 

Interest and exchange 24 

Salary of Agent 24 

Expenses of agency 24 

State stocks redeemed 24 

Vincennes University bonds — nature of explained 24 

Vincennes University bonds — interest on 25 

Domestic debt of the State 25 

Treasury notes redeemed 25 

Treasury notes — interest paid on 26 



282 



Page. 

Wabash and Erie Canal receipts and expenditui-es 26 

General remarks 27 

Balances due from the treasury 27 

Value of taxaWes for It's" and 1856 compared • 28 

Number of polls for 1S57 nnd 1856 compared 28 

Free banking 31 

Circulation of free banks 32 

Value of securities of free banks .' 32 

Appendix 83 



Doc. Ho. 4.] [PartL 

REPORT 



COMMISSIONERS 



Of THB 



SINKING FUND, 



FOR THE YEAR 1857. 



TO THE GOVERNOR, 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE PEINTBR. 
1857. 

J D. J.— 20 



REPORT. 



Office of Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, 1 
Indianapolis, December 21, 1857. / 

His Excellency A. P. \^illard, 

Governor of the State of Indiana: ', 

Sir: — Herewith is submitted the annual report of the Com- 
missioners of the Sinking Fund, showing its condition on the 
21st ultimo, (A), and also an exhibit of the business of the fund 
from November 3, 1856, to November 21, 1857, (B). 

It has been the earnest effort of the Board to purchase all the 
bonds of the State issued for banking purposes, which could be 
procured at a fair and liberal advance above the value of the 
other five per cent, stocks of the State; for which purpose adver- 
tisements have been made, both in England and in this country, 
of our readiness to make such purchase; and we have bought 
of them, during the last year, $262,000, at an average cost of 
about ninety cents on the dollar. 

Not receiving oifers for as many of the bonds issued for bank 
loan as we were able to purchase, the Board bought $155,000 of 
Indiana five per cents., and $18,000 of Ohio five per cents., at 
the rate of about eighty cents on the dollar, and also $20,000 
of Indiana 2|- per cent, stocks, at fifty-two cents. 

Besides paying the interest on the bonds issued for bank loan. 
there has been invested $178,193 10, in loans to citizens of the 
State, of $500 and under, on mortgages of real estate. 

It will be the purpose of the Board to continue to in\'e8t the 
income of the fund in like manner, as above stated, in purchases 
of State securities and in loans, as may be most advantageous to 
the interests of the fund. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. DUMONT, President 
P. M. Parks, 

B. McClelland, I U 

John F. Carr, > Commissioners. 

Joseph V. Bbmusdaffer. 



288 



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Doc. ]^o. 5.] [PartL 

SLXTII ANNUAL REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



STATE OF ITsDIANA. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE PRINTKR, 
1857. 

1 D. J.— 21 



STATE BOAED OF EDUCATION. 



WILLIAM C. LARRABEE, Supenntendent. 
ASHBEL P. WILLARD, Governor. 
AQUILLA JONES, Treasurer of State. 
JOHN W. DODD, Auditor of State. 
DANIEL McCLIJRE, Secretary of State. 
JOSEPH E. McDonald, Attorney General. 



SUPERINTENDEINT'S MPORT. 



To His Excellency A. P. Willard, 

Governor of hidiana: 

The first constitution of Indiana, formed in 1816, provided 
that, "inasmuch as knowledge and learning, generally diffused 
throughout the community, were essential to a free government, 
it should be the duty of the General Assembly to provide by 
law for a general system of education, ascending in a regular 
gradation from township schools to a State University, where 
instruction should be free, and equally open to all." 

In accordance with these constitutional provisions, the Gen- 
eral Assembly passed laws incorporating congressional town- 
ships, and provided for schools therein, organizing county 
seminaries and establishing a State ITniversity. Charters were 
also granted for private academics and colleges. 

In the Revised Statutes of 1843, an attempt was made to ap- 
proach more nearly than had been before done the general sys- 
tem required by the constitution. The congressional townships 
were more fully organized, and the powers and duties of the 
officers thereof were specified. Provision was made for the 
eflective organization of school districts, each of which was con- 
stituted a body corporate, with power to determine the site of 
their school house, the length of the school, and the branches to 
be taught therein, and to assess, by vote, taxes on the property 
of the inhabitants of the district, for the building, furnishing 
and repairs of school houses, and for the payment of tuition. 
The public funds of each township, arising from the surplus 
revenue, congressional township fund, and other sources, were 
distributed to each district in proportion to the number of child- 
ren therein. So long as any district school could be supported 
by the public money, derived from trust funds or taxation, it 
was open and free to all the children residing in the district. 



298 

If, however, the school, by vote of the inhabitants of the dis- 
trict, continued after the public funds were exhausted, the defi- 
ciency was made up either by voluntary contribution or by 
tuition bills, which could be legally collected from those who 
sent to the school. Uudcr this system, there was often great 
variety in the length, efficiency, and character of the schools in 
the same township, a*s each district formed a distinct corpora- 
tion, with power to assess taxes and to manage its school affairs 
in its o^^■n way. 

In 1849, an act was passed to increase and extend the benefits 
of common schools. This act provided for the levying of a 
school tax of ten cents on the hundred dollars, and of twenty -five 
cents on every person liable to pay a poll tax for State purposes. 
The income from this property and poll tax was to be added to 
the income from the surplus revenue, saline and bank tax funds, 
in each county, and to be denominated the county common 
school fund. 

The county treasurers were to distribute the amount derived 
from these various sources annually among the townships of 
their several counties. The school districts were authorized, by 
a vote of the majority, to raise an additional tax for building 
school houses, and for continuing the school after the public 
money was expended. Under this law, schools were required to 
be taught at least three months each year in every district. 

This law, in order to go into effect in any county, required the 
assent of the citizens, by vote, to be given on the day of the 
annual election. Only a part of the counties had assented to 
the law before it was rendered void by the provisions of the new 
constitution. Had the law continued before the people, it is 
probable that all the counties in the State would ultimately have 
assented to it, and under its operations we might now have a 
good and efficient system. 

The members of tiie Constitutional Convention of 1851 
deemed a radical change necessary in the system of public edu- 
cation, as well as in many other laws. They made it the duty 
of the General Assembly to provide not only for a general but 
for a uniform system of common schools, wherein tuition should 
be without charge and equally open to all. They also deprived 
the General Assembly of all power to pass local or special laws, 
"providing for the supporting of common schools, and for the 
preservation of school funds." 

The General Assembly of 1852 passed an act to provide for a 
general and uniform system of common schools, and matters 
properly connected therewith. The first and second sections of 
this act read as follows : 

\ "Sec. 1. There shall be annually assessed and collected, as 
the State and county revenues are assessed and collected, ^r6'f, 



299 

on the list of property taxable for State purposes, the sum of ten 
cents on each one hundred dollars. 

" Sec. 2. The funds heretofore known and designated as the 
congressional township fund, the surplus revenue fund, the 
county common school fund, and all funds heretofore appro- 
priated to common schools, the saline fund, the baiik tax fund, 
shall, together with the fund which shall be derived from the 
sale of the county seminaries, and the property belonging 
thereto, from the tines assessed for breaches of the penal laws 
of the State, and from all forfeitures which may accrue, all 
lands and other estates which shall escheat to the State for want 
of heirs or kindred entitled to the inheritance, all lands which 
have been or may hereafter be granted to the State, where no 
special purpose is expressed in the grant, and the proceeds of the 
sales thereof, including the proceeds of the sales of the swamp 
lands granted to the State of Indiana by the act of Congress of 
28th September, 1850, and deducting the expenses of selecting 
and draining the same, the taxes which may from time to time 
be assessed upon the property of corporations for common school 
purposes, the fund arising from the one nuudred and fourteenth 
section of the charter of the State Bank of Indiana, and unre- 
claimed fees as provided by law, shall be denominated the com- 
mon school fund, the income of which, together with the taxes 
mentioned and specified in the first section of this act, shall be 
applied to the support of common schools." 

It was provided by this law that every township, incorporated 
town, and city in the State, should form a corporation for school 
purposes, with power, through a board of trustees, to establish 
in each township, town, or city, as many schools as might be 
necessary for the education of all the children therein ; locate, 
build, and furnish school houses ; employ teachers, and by a vote 
of the people of the township, levy a tax for the purpose of 

• building or repairing school houses, and purchasing sites there- 
for; providing fuel, furniture, maps, apparatus, libraries, or in- 
crease thereof, or to discharge debts incurred therefor, and for 
continuing their schools after the public funds shall have been 
expended. 

Under this law, the proceeds of the general State tax, and of 
all the funds enumerated in the second section of the law, were 

. distributed annually to the townships, towns, and cities of the 
State, in proportion to the number of children in each. In 
addition to the sum received thus from the general fund, each 
township, town, and city might, by a vote of the people, raise a 
limited amount by corporate taxation. "With the funds thus at 
command, the corporation trustees were required to support a 
convenient number of schools in their corporate territory. Dis- 
tricts were abolished, and all their rights were transferred to the 
township. This law made many radical changes from the old 



300 

system. Some of the changes gave great dissatisfaction among 
the people. The abolishing of the districts made great trouble in 
many places, especially in cases in which the people of one district, 
having just erected, at their own expense, a school house, were 
called on to pay by taxation for the building of school houses in 
other parts of the township. The consolidation of all the school 
funds, by the second section of the law, gave still greater dis- 
satisfaction. The State tax, instead of being distributed in the 
counties in which it was collected, was paid into the common 
fund, for distribution throughout the whole State. Still more 
serious were the complaints against the consolidation of the con- 
gressional township fund, and the equalization of the proceeds 
by distribution, annuall}^ to all the townships of the State, in 
proportion to the number of children therein. This congres- 
sional township fund, arising from the sale of the sixteenth sec- 
tion, varied greatly in amount in diiferent townships; and it was 
claimed that the Legislature had no right to divert it from the 
inhabitants of the particular townships to whom it had been 
supposed to belong, and consolidate it with other funds for 
general distribution. In several counties injunctions were ob- 
tained from the courts restraining the county officers from pay- 
ing the interest on the congressional township fund to any 
persons except the citizens of the respective townships. Counsel 
were appointed by the State Board of Education to defend the 
law, and the whole question was fully argued before the Supreme 
Court of the State. We present in full the decision of the court 
on this question, as tound in the Indiana Reports: 

The State op Indiana and Others v. Springfield Township in 
Franklin County. 

The sixteenth section in the several congressional townships in this State waB 
granted by Congress to the inhabitants of such townships respectively, for the use 
of schools therein and not elsewhere; and the grant was accepted by the State on 
the terms in which it was made. 

By the sale of tlie sixteenth section in the several congressional townships in this 
State, under the act of Congress of 1828, the proceeds became trust funds, to be 
applied for the use of schools in such townships respectively, and not else- 
where. 

The act of Congress of 1828, authorizing the sale of the sixteenth section in the 
several congressional townships in this State, and the several acts of Congress 
reserving, and also those granting, the sixteenth section in the several townships 
in this State and other States for the use of schools, being in relation to the same 
Bxihjcct matter, arc to be taken in pari materia and construed as one act, in ascer- 
taining the purpose of the grant of the sixteenth section of the sevei-al town- 
ghipB in this State. 

The circumstance that when the sixteenth section in the several townships in this 
State was granted by Congress to the inhabitants for the use of schools therein, 
there were, in some of the townships, no inhabitants, did not affect the validity 
of the grant. 

A repeal by the legislature of the act creating congressional townships, could not 
affect the validity of the grant by (Congress of the sixteenth section in thoso 
townships to the inhabitants for the use of schools therein, nor give the State 



SOI 

Any better right than it otherwise w)uld have had to divert the funds derived 
from the sale of such sections. The grant in question was a contract executed 
and incapable of revocation by the legislature. 

Semfilfi, that so far as the corporate capacity of the several congressional townships 
relates to the funds derived from the sale of the sixteenth section in such town- 
ships, they are private corporations created to meet the terms of the grant by 
Congress of said sections, ar.d their powers can not be repealed by the legis- 
lature. 

The school law of 1852, so far as it diverts the proceeds of the sale of the sixteenth 
section in the several congressional townships from the use of schools in such 
townships respectively to the use of the school system of the State at large, is in 
contravention of section 7 of article 8 of the constitution. 

APPEAL from the Franklin Circuit Court. 

Stuart, J. — Appeal from an order of injunction restraining 
the auditor, treasurer, and board of commissioners of Franklin 
county, from distributing the income of a certain school fund, 
alleged to belong to the appellee. 

The fund in controversy is the proceeds of the sale of the six- 
teenth section in Springfield township. It is claimed that by 
the act of Congress of April 19, 1816, that section was granted 
in every township "to the inhabitants thereof, for the use of 
schools." The school law of 1852 treats the township fund as 
the property of the State, and its income subject to her disposal, 
for the use of the common school system. The complaint is 
that the defendants are about to execute the law, and thereby 
divert the income of the Springfield township fund, amounting 
to 7,423 dollars and 36 cents, from the use of the inhabitants of 
that township, to the support of schools elsewhere. 

The prayer of the complaint is, that the defendants be en- 
joined, &c. 

A temporary injunction was granted, agreeably to the prayer 
of the complaint. From that decision this appeal is prose- 
cuted. 

There are no technical objections raised by counsel on either 
side. Under the rules of court, we are thus relieved from 
taking judicial notice of any formal defects which may exist. 
We therefore proceed, at once, to the principal matter in con- 
troversy. 

The act of the legislature, the validity of which is thus ques- 
tioned, enumerates the several funds which are to be consolidated 
under the denomination of the "common school fund." First 
in the list of consolidated funds is the congressional township 
fund. 

Prior to 1852, a separate account was kept with each tov/n- 
ship. K. S. 1843, p. 254. The income of the fund arising out 
of the sale of the sixteenth section was expended for the use of 
schools within the township. Thus the inhabitants of each 
township enjoyed the income of their own particular fund. 

The school law of 1852 contemplates an entire change. Cioil 
townships, with difterent boundaries, are substituted for covgres- 



302 

sional townships. There is no longer to be anj congressional 
township fund recognized. All the separate funds, the town- 
ship, surplus revenue, saline, bank tax, &c., are united. The 
fund of each township is thus commingled with those of other 
townships, and with other school funds. Pamphlet School Law, 
notes, p. 26. The income arising from the consolidated fund is 
to be distributed ratably throughout the State for the support of 
common schools. 

In brief, the law diverts the proceeds of the sixteenth section 
from the use of schools in the congressional township where the 
land was situated, to the use of the school system of the State at 
large. 

And the only question raised is, was it competent for the State 
80 to divert the township fund? 

The appellants claim that the title to the sixteenth section 
was vested in the State ; and that it is her right to expend the 
income of the fund upon such system of common schools as she 
may deem best adapted to diffuse the blessings of education 
among all classes. 

The appellees insist that this diversion of the township fund 
is in conflict with the acts of Congress, and in violation of the 
constitution of the United States. 

Counsel on both sides seem to take it for granted that the 
school law is in accordance with the constitution of the State. 
The same view of the harmony between the law and the consti- 
tution prevailed, of course, with the majority of the legislature 
that passed the act. Many of the leading men who moulded 
the school law had been prominent members of the constitutional 
convention. The same opinion seems also to have prevailed in 
the asseiiibly of 1853. Pamphlet School Law, p. 34. 

If this opinion be correct, the question now raised on the 
school law arises on the constitution itself. To show with what 
tvarrant the impression of the accord between the law and con- 
stitution is so generally entertained, the eighth article of the 
latter, and the corresponding sections of the former, are inserted 
in note 1 at the end of this opinion. 

It is not our province to trace the idea of diverting the town- 
nhip fund to its origin; nor to inquire through what channels, 
legislative or constitutional, that sentiment seemed to run, fur- 
ther than may be useful to elucidate the pending question. 

The 8uV)ject seems to have been broached as early as the ses- 
sion of 1848-9 ; House Journal, p. 319 ; and perhaps even earlier. 
It was also agitated in the constitutional convention. At the 
session of" l!Sril-2, it came to maturity in the form of the act 
now under consideration. 

If the first four sections of article eight (see note 1) stood 
alone, qualified only by the clause quoted from section 22 of 
article 4, the court would be divided as to whether the constitu- 
tion itself did not consolidate, and thus divert, the township 



303 

fund. But the difficulty seems to be removed by a subsequent 
section. The seventh section of article eight, whatever its his- 
tory, or for whatever purpose introduced, enjoins that "All trust 
funds, held by the State, shall remain inviolate, and be faithfully 
and exclusively applied to the purposes for which the trust was 
created." 

On the subject of education, the constitution of 1816, and 
that of 1851, declare, that education, generally diffVised, is essen- 
tial to a free government. In both its encouragement is en- 
joined as a duty on the general assembly. The difference seems 
to be, that the new constitution gives unity to the school funds, 
and contemplates a uniform system of common schools as a 
State institntion, under an official head. Section 8, article 8, 
quoted in note 1. It is tacitly assumed, that the wealth of the 
State should educate the children of the State. 

Hence any enactment which the wisdom of the legislature 
might devise, to carry out that policy, should receive the favor- 
able consideration of the courts, unless it clearly conflict with 
laAvs of higher obligation. Fletcher v. Peck, 6 Cranch 87. — 
Newell V. The PeophCs Selden 9. 

Bringing the school law of 1852 to the test of the seventh 
section of the eighth article of the constitution, let us inquu'e, 
what was the purpose for which the congressional township fund 
was created? 

That question must be answered, primarily, by the terms of 
the grant. When Congress granted the sixteenth section, it is 
to be presumed the purpose of the grant was expressed. Ac- 
cordingly, the sixth section of the act of April 19, 1816, "to 
enable the people of the Indiana territory to form a constitu- 
tion," &c., makes the following, among other propositions, 
which, "if accepted, shall be obligatory upon the United States," 
viz., "that the section numbered sixteen, in every township, and 
when such section has been sold, granted, or disposed of, other 
lands equivalent thereto, and most contiguous to the same, shall 
be granted to the inhabitants of such township for the use of schools," 
The act is published at length in the revised statutes. 1 R. 
S. 93. 

It is matter of history that these propositions were accepted 
on the part of the people of Indiana, by a solemn ordinance of 
their constitutional convention. 1 R. S. 95. 

In construing language so plain, the only mystery is, how it 
could ever have given rise to any doubt. With the terms of the 
grant in view, the very statement of the question seems equiva- 
lent to a decision. Had the legislature passed an act consolid- 
ating the property of A and B, diverting it from their exclusive 
use, and providing for the ratable distribution of its income 
amongst A, B, C and D, the case would not be as strong as this. 
Yet the unsoundness of such legislation, as violating funda- 
mental principles, would not admit of doubt. Every one could 



304 

see, at a glance, its vicious tendency and dangerous assumptions. 
That the inhaibitants of the respective townships were quasi 
corporations, called into artificial existence hy the legislature, 
and strangled by the same power when their funds were wanted, 
does not seem either to distinguish the case nor justify .the act. 
The ingenious hypothesis of counsel does not blunt the force of 
the illustration. 

But the great importance of any question affecting so many 
interests and persons, putting in issue the constitutional action 
of the legislature, and involving the unity of a school system so 
elaborate, and claimed to be so complete, demands an extended 
and careful consideration. 

Prior acts of Congress throw an additional light on the inten- 
tion of the grant. The ordinance of May 20, 1785, "to ascertain 
the mode of disposing of lands in the western territory," pro- 
vided, that " there should be reserved the lot number sixteen of 
every township, for the maintenance of public schools within 
the said township." 

The act of March 26, 1804, making provision for the disposal 
of the public lands in the Indiana territory, (sec. 6), provides 
that "the section numbered sixteen in every township," &c., 
"shall be reserved for the use of schools wdthin the same." 

Then follows the grant of April 19, 1816, suj^ra, to the inhabit- 
ants for the use of schools. 

It is not necessary to pause on the single word in the grant 
which alone tends to give limits and locality to the munificence 
of Congress. That word is inhabitants. It is used in the first 
section ^of the act of April 19, 1816, s?/7;ra, thus: "Be it en- 
acted," &c., "that the inhabitants of the territory of Indiana be 
and they are hereby authorized to form for themselves a consti- 
tution and state government," &c. Here it defines and limits 
the right of forming a constitution, &c., to those who inhabit the 
Indiana territory. It excludes, ex vi termini, from participation 
in the rights conferred by the act, all inhabiting beyond those 
limits. So in the sixth section it is also a term of exclusion. 
Those living beyond the limits of the township are excluded 
from sharing the income of the sixteenth section or its proceeds. 
The w^ord inhabitants, as there used, is of itself sufliciently potent 
to confine the expenditure of the fund for the use of schools 
within and for the township. 

The intention of Congress is further illustrated by subsequent 
legislation on kindred subjects, wherein it is observable the word 
inhabitants occurs uniformly and with an obvious purpose. 

On the admission of Illinois by the act of April 18, 1818, and 
Missouri by tlie act of March G, 1820, a similar grant was made 
for the same purpose in somewhat diflerent terms, viz., that 
"section sixteen in every township," &c., "should be granted to 
the k^iate for the use of the inhabitants for the use of schools." 



305 

The act of Congress of March 2, 1819, for the admission of 
Alabama, contains the same propositions made to Indiana. The 
grant of the sixteenth section is also in the same terms, viz., to 
the inhabitants, for the use of schools. 

Similar grants have been made in all the new States; but 
these are selected because the grants have received construction 
in the State courts. 

In 1827, the legislature of Indiana applied to Congress to ex- 
tend to the General Assembly the power to sell the school lands. 
The congressional response, passed May, 1828, is couched in 
these remarkable words: 

" That the legislature of the State of Indiana shall be and is 
hereby authorized to sell and convey, in fee simple,, all or any 
part of the lands heretofore reserved and appropriated by Con- 
gress for the use of schools within said State, and to invest the 
money arising from the sale thereof in some productive fund, 
the proceeds of which shall be forever applied, under the direc- 
tion of said legislature, for the use and support of schools, within 
the several townships and districts of country for which they were 
origincdly reserved and set ajjart, and for no other purpose whatso- 
ever: Provided, said land or any part thereof shall in no case be 
sold, without the consent of the inhabitants of such township or 
district, to be obtained in such manner as the legislature of said 
State shall by law direct. And provided, also, that in- the appor- 
tionment of the proceeds of said fund, each township and dis- 
trict aforesaid shall be entitled to such part thereof, and no more, 
as shall have accrued from the sum or sums of money arising 
from the sale of the school land, belonging to such township or 
district." Vide note 2. 

The original impression seems to have been that the lands 
should be leased, and the rents and profits applied to the use of 
schools. The policy was to provide a school fund for every 
locality of six miles, which should be permanent and perpetual. 
So it seems to have been understood both by Congress and the 
General Assembly. R. S. 1824, p. 380. Hence the necessity of 
obtaining the sanction of Congress to the proposed change in 
the character of the trust. 

In this light, the act of May, 1828, is to be taken in pari ma- 
teria with other acts on the same subject. Though passed at 
different sessions of Congress, yet as they all relate to the same 
subject matter, they are to be taken and construed together as 
one act. The whole form a body of law from which the purpose 
of the grant is to be deduced. Smith on Statutory and Consti- 
tutional Construction, 751. 

Thus in 1785 and in 1804, the sixteenth section is reserved in 
each township for the use of schools within the same. In 1816, 
it is granted to the inhabitants of such township for the use of 
schools. In 1828, the sixteenth section may be sold ivith the con- 
sent of the inhabitants. It is further provided, as indicative of 



806 

the original purpose of the grant, that the proceeds be forever 
applied for the use of schools within the several townshi-ps and 
districts of country for which they were originally set apart, and for 
no other purpose whatever. The several acts for the admission of 
lUiuois, Alabama and Missouri, further illustrate collaterally the 
purpose of the grant. In all those enactments the language is 
clear and explicit. The purpose of Congress in granting the 
sixteenth section is for the benefit of the inhabitants of the town- 
ship in Avhich the section is located. Whether the grant be to 
the State for the use of the inhabitants, or directly to the inhabit- 
ants, is, for the present, immaterial. The point of inquiry is the 
intention and purpose of the grant. In every instance, to whom- 
Boever gi^ited, it is dedicated to a particular use, for the benefit 
of particular persons. That use is the schools of the township; 
and the persons to be benefited, the inhabitants of the toivnship in 
which the lands are situated. 

Historically, these several acts indicate the settled policy of 
the government since the period of the first reservation of the 
eixteenth section in 1785. 

If, as the counsel contend, the acts prior to 1816 be regarded 
only as an intimation of future policy; the act of 1816 the com- 
pletion of that policy; and the act of 1828 simply nugatory; still 
the latter act, as a legislative exposition of what had been done, 
would seem to leave nothing wanting to demonstrate the settled 
purpose of Congress in first reserving and subsequently granting 
the sixteenth section. The grant for the schools and the inhabit- 
ants of the township exclusively, stands unimpaired, and even 
fortified by that construction. 

The purpose of the grant is still further elucidated by the 
second proposition in the sixth section of the act of April, 1816, 
supra. The salt springs out of which the saline fund arose, is 
granted to the State, for the use of the people thereof. This occurs 
in the very next sentence after the grant of the sixteenth section ; 
clearly intending to distinguish between the inhabitants of the 
townships respectively, in the one grant, and the people of the State 
at large, in the other. 

The obvious policy of such a grant may be suggested as an 
auxiliary consideration in favor of this construction. It was to 
encourage the settlement of all parts of the State, and thus 
secure the speedy disposal of the public lands. The same policy 
has since added the pre-emption laws. A supplemental and 
higher consideration was, no doubt, the diffusion of knowledge 
among the people, by laying the basis of a school fund uni- 
formly, every six miles, throughout the State. 

It will not be pretended that the sale of the school section, 
with the consent of the inhabitants, under the direction of the 
legislature and the sanction of Congress, changed the purpose of 
the grant. The terms upon which Congress authorized the sale 
are too explicit to leave room for mistake. Act of May, 1828, 
supra. Instead of a trust estate, it became, by the sale, "trust 



307 

funds." It is in this light that the new constitution (section 7, 
article 8, quoted in note 1, infra,) contemplates them as trust 
funds; and enjoins on the General Assembly their faithful and 
exclusive application to the "purposes for which the trust was 
created."' 

Such being the history and purpose of the grant on the part 
of the United States, it is pertinent to inquire, in the next place, 
how the grant has been treated by the State of Indiana. 

The convention that framed the constitution of 1816, for 
themselves and their posterity, accepted the propositions of Con- 
gress. Among these propositions, we have seen, was the grant 
of the sixteenth section. They were accepted in the very terme 
of the grant, without any qualification whatever. 1 R. S. 95. 
This solemn ordinance would alone seem sufficient. It is conse- 
crated by adherence to its terms for a period far beyond the 
generation that gave it birth. The men of that day seemed to 
have no idea that its solemn obligations would ever sit lightly on 
their posterity. There is no allusion to any such contingency. 
They made no provision for weighing fanciful considerations of 
expediency against the plighted public faith. To them belongs 
the honor of enjoining upon the General Assembly "to provide 
by law for a general system of education, ascending in regular 
gradation from township schools to a State university, wherein 
tuition shall be gratis and equally open to all." Constitution of 
1816, art. 9, sec. 2. 

Under this constitution and the laws made in pursuance of it, 
the school system was managed up to the taking effect of the 
school law of 1852, 

The practical exposition of the grant by the state government 
for a period of over thirty-six years, cannot fail to have its 
weight. During all that time the school section and the town- 
ship fund arising from the sale of it, were administered for the 
use of schools within the township, in accordance with the uni- 
versal understanding of the terms of the grant. The purpose 
of the grant was repeatedly recognized by the assembly, often 
in the very language of the grant itself. 

Without stopping to analyze all the State legislation on the 
subject, a few instances must suffice. Thus in January, 1828, 
the proceeds of the sale of the sixteenth section are directly 
recognized as " a school fund, to be forever applied to the use of 
the inhabitants of the respective townships in the support of schools 
iherein,'" &c. A similar recognition is made in the school laws 
of 1831, 1833 and 1838. Further, the faith of the State is re- 
peatedly pledged to the inhabitants of each township for the 
preservation of such of the funds belonging thereto as are con- 
trolled by the State, and for the payment of the annual interest 
thereon to the townships properly entitled to receive the same. R, S. 
1831, p. 468.— Acts of 1833, p. 88.— R. S.. 1838, p. 522. 



308 

From that period up to the session of the assembly of 1851-2, 
though the subject of diverting the fund was agitated, as we 
have seen, the whole tenor of legislation is a continued recogni- 
tion of the rights of the inhabitants to the exclusive use of the 
congressional township fund. R. S. 1843, chap. 13, article 8, p. 
253.— Jc/., p. 261. 

Even as late as 1849, when many radical changes were intro- 
duced in the mode of administering the trust, the township fund 
remained unimpaired. The legislature carefully guarded against 
any misconstruction as to the integrity of the fund. It is done 
in these memorable words, evincing a full knowledge of the his- 
tory and purpose of the grant, as well as a just appreciation of 
the sacredness of the trust. " Provided, That nothing herein 
contained shall be so construed as to divert the fund commonly 
called the congressional township fund, or any part thereof, from 
the objects and purposes for which it was created by Congress." 
General Laws 1849, p. 125. 

That recognition alone, thirty-three years after the grant, 
might, it should seem, suffice. Such intelligent appreciation of 
a public duty, in the administration of a public trust, is grateful 
to contemplate. It outweighs a world of visionary theories 
which would place any fancied expediency above the public 
faith ; or inaugurate a new era in education by an act which it 
is not easy to distinguish from a breach of public trust. 

The executive officers of the government, under all the phases 
of the school law, recognized, within their proper spheres, the 
rights of the inhabitants to the income of the township fund. 

Even the courts added the weight of their authority in the 
same direction. " The grant," says Judge Sullivan, " by the act 
of Congress of 1816, of the sixteenth section, is not to the State,, 
but to the inhabitants of the township in which the section lies." 
The State v. Newton, 5 Blackf 455. 

So in Missouri. In The State v. Dent, though the grant was 
to "the State, for the use of the inhabitants, for the use of 
schools," yet her own courts regard the State as a mere trustee 
for the inhabitants. 18 Missouri R. 313. So, also, the same court 
in Butler v. Chariton County Court, 13 id. 112. 

A question somewhat similar came before the Supreme Court 
of Ohio in relation to what is called the "ministerial sections." 
In the sale of lands by the United States to the Ohio Land Com- 
pany, and to one Symmes, section sixteen in every township was 
reserved for the use of schools, and section twenty-nine for the 
use of religion in the township. The sections thus reserved for 
religious purposes were denominated the "ministerial sections." 
It was held that the fund derived from the sale of the "minis- 
terial sections" was intended for the support of religion in the 
tovmship in vjhich the section vms located; and could not be diverted 
to any other jrarpose, or for the support of religion in any other 
place. The Slate v. The Trustees, ^c, 11 Ohio li. 24. 



ao9 

In Morton v. The Granada Academy^ it was held, that the 
school sections numbered sixteen are trxist -property for the bencfil 
of the whole township in which they are situated; and that the 
h'i2;islature has nc }Jo\ver to divert them from that purpose. 8 
StnedciS and Marsh. 773. 

Wo are cited by the appellants to several decisions of the Su- 
preme Court of Illinois for a different purpose, in regard to which 
we would be slow to admit the doctrine to the extent it is there 
pressed. But these very decisions are directly in point on the 
question we are now considering, viz., the power of the legislature 
to divert the fund. In Bush v. Skipman^ it is held, that though 
the grant is to the State for the use of the inhabitants^ &c., yet as 
a matter of good faith the effects of the township should be secured 
tur the use of those for whom they were donated. 4 Scam. ISO. 

Long V. Broion is also cited to a point, (the title,) in which it is 
opposed by the authority of our own court in 5 Blackf. 455, supra, 
ant directly overruled in the Vinceunes University case, 14 Ilow. 
2()S. Bet on the point we are now considering, it is good authority, 
and consistent with the case in Howard. It is there declared that 
the sixteenth section .is held by the State in perpetuity for the use 
and benefit of the inhabitants of the proper township. G Alabama 
W. (Xew Series) 622. 

On the same point, Judge McLean: "The citizens within the 
townsliip are the beneficiaries of the charity. The title to these 
lantls has never been considered in the State; and it has no inherent 
right to appropriate them to any other purpose than for the benefit 
of schools. For the exercise of the charity nnder the laws, the 
title is in the township." The trustees of the Vinceimes University 
V. The Slate of fndiana, 14 How. 268. 

The dissenting opinion of Taney, G. J., does not favor the diver- 
sion of the fund. "Tlie reservation of the school sections un- 
donbtedly dedicated them to the uses for which they were reserved; 
and they cannot be api)ropriated by the State to any other purpose. 
lUit Congress alone has the power to designate the body by whom 
the trust should be administered." 1 4 How., supra. 

So that whether the one opinion or the other be adopted, the 
result is the same. Both agree that the fund can not be appro- 
priated by the State to any other purpose ; that the trustee has no 
power to divert it from the specific purposes for which the trust 
was created. 

The supervision exercised by tJie legislature over the township 
fund is but an implied necessity sanctioned by Congress. It ex- 
tends only to protecting and administering, not diverting, the 
fund. 

It but remains to inquire, does the school law of 1859 faithfully 
and exclusively apply tliat fund to the purposes for which it was 
created? We are clearly of opinion that it does not. The opera- 
tion of the law is to distribute to the people of the State at large a 
1 D. J.— 22. 



310 

Bchool fund created for the exclusive use of the iuliabitants of 
Springfield township. 

To thai extent the law is in violation of the seventh section of 
article eight of the constitution, and therefore void. 

We have not been careful to inquire how far the school law of 
IS52 may conflict with the constitution of the United States. It 
is sufhcient that it conflicts with the IState constitution. The laws 
of Congress have therefore been examined solely with a view to 
ascei'tain the intention of the grant. 

It is urged that in most of the townships there were not at the 
time any inhahitanis. I5ut at common law, land may be granted 
to pious uses before there is a grantie in existence competent to 
take. 14 How., «?//?'•«. — 'I he Preshyterian Churchy <^c , v. Wil- 
liams, 1 Ohio Stale R. 478. In the meantime, the fee will be in 
abeyance. Story J, in The Town of Paul et\. Clark, ^^ Craneh '2U!2. 
These school lands donated to cfuuiiahJe uses fall within the same 
reason, and are governed by the same rule. 

It is fui'ther insisted that tiie congressional townships were mere 
municipal corporations, existing at the will of the legislature; and 
that the act creating civil townships, with corporate powers, re- 
pealed by implication the former acts. 

But even if this position were admitted, it is not perceived how 
it could inure to the benefit of the vState, or give her any better 
right to divert the township fund. The property of the deceased 
does not ordinarily fall to the party who gave the fatal lilow. The 
artificial person created by the State may have been brought to an 
untimely end by the same power. But the effects of the delhiict 
corporation do not thereby escheat. The inhabitants still remain. 
They are "the beneficiaries of the charity." Tiie grant once made 
to the inhal)itants can not be invalidated. It is a contract executed, 
which even the sovereign power can not revoke. Fletcher v. VcclCy 
6 Craneh b7. — ! crrett v. Taylor. U Craneh 43. — Tha Tov>n of 
Puult'i V. Clark, y Craiudi, 'ii);"). Besides, by the act for the incor- 
poration of c'lDgressi'mal townslii[)S, the General Assembly vested 
the hin Is. resei'ved by Congress for the use of sclioois, in each con- 
gressional townshi]) in the corpo rations thereof. 11. S. lb'24, p. 3S0. 
(She is therefore widiiii the rule in Craneh, suj}ra^ even if she ever 
liad a shadow of title to dispose of. 

Hence, admittins: the demise of the corporations, the State is not 
entith.'d to the school iund, lior released from her duty as trustee to 
admiidster it faithlhlly and exclusively inv the benefit of the in- 
Juihitmits. 

So far as these corporations may have been invested with politi- 
cal ])Ower or jiarticipated in the administration td" municipal atfairs, 
the position of the appellants is undoubtedly correct. 'J'he hgisla- 
tnre could recall -such ])owir at ])leasure. There is no vested i-ight 
in corporate i'rancliises creati-d for ])iiblic ])urposes. But so 1'ar as 
their corporate capacity related to the fun;i of which the inhabit- 
ants were the beneficiaries, it presents a very different question. 



311 

To tlint extent tlicy are, perhaps, embraced within tlie rule in tlie 
Dartmouth Collep^e case, 4 Wheat. 5 IS. They would seem to bs 
private corporations created to meet the terms of the tyrant. Acts 
of 1817, p. 1U4 — Acts of 1S18, p. 3IJL— II. S. lS-24,^p. 379—11. 
S. 1831, p. 403.— Acts of 1833, p. 78.— R. S. 1838, p. 509.— R. S. 
1843, p. 306. 

Since the State can not, in any event, divert the fund, it would 
not become her, if she couhl, to repeal the coi-porate powers of ihe 
inhabitants, and thus emlnirrass the administration of the school 
funds. She would not thus needlessly compromise her dignity and 
good faith, by assuming a hostile and unnatural attitaJe to any 
portion of her citizens. She should rather confer on them increased 
facilities to administer their school funds efRciently, 

It is urged in argument that the ruling indicated would be a 
deadly blow to the common school system of Indiana. We do not 
so regard it. We should be slow to believe th:)t human ingenuity 
has bjen exhausted in the concoction of an unconstitutional enact- 
ment. However that may be, the responsiijility does not Ho with 
the judiciary. If the legislative department will impinge on tha 
constitution, the duty of the courts may be arduous and unpleasant, 
but it is a plain one, regardless of consequences. 

As there are no disputed facts to be adjudicated, only the single 
question of law involved, we see no necessity for remanding tlie 
cause for i'urther proceeilings. 

Per Cur'unn. — It is therefore ordered that the Franklin Circuit 
Court make the injunction granted in this cause perpetual. 

J. D. Howland, for the appellants. 

G. Holland, ibr the appellee. 

(1) The following is the eighth article of the constitution in relation to "Ediv- 
cation:" 

"Section 1. Knowledge and learning, generally diffused throughout a cora- 
munity, being essential to the preservation of a free government, it shall bo lli« 
duty of the General Assembly to encourage, by all suitable means, moral, inteW 
lectual, scientific, and agricultural improvement; and to provide, by law, for a 
general and uniform system of common schools, wherein tuition shall be witlioul 
charge, and equally open to all. 

"Skc. 2. The comn.on school fund shall consist of the congressional township 
fund, and the lands belonging thereto; 

"The surplus revenue fund; 

"The saline fund and the lands belonging thereto; 

"The bank tax fund, and the fund arising from the one hundred and fourteenth 
section of the charter of the State Cank of Indiana; 

"The fund to be derived fi-om the sale of county seminaries, and the moneys and 
property heretofore held by such seminaries; from the fines assessed for breaches 
of the penal laws of the State; and from all forfeitures which may accrue; 

"All lands and other estate which shall escheat to the State for want of heira 
or kindred entitled to the inlieritance; 

"All lands that have been, or may hereafter be, granted to the State, where no 
special purpose is expressed in the grant, and the proceeds of the sales thereof] 
including the proceeds of the sales of the swamp lands, granted to the State of 
Indiana by the act of Congress of 28th September, 1850, after deducting the ex- 
pense of selecting and draining the same; 

"Taxes on the property of corporations, that may be assessed for common school 
purposes. 



'-Sec. 3. The principal of the common school fund shall remain a perpetuaT 
fund, which may be increased, but shall never be diminished; and the income 
thereof shall be inviolably appropriated to the suppoi't of common schools, and to 
no other purpose whatever. 

''fc>Ko. 4. The General Assembly shall invest, in some safe and profitable man- 
ner, all such portions of the common school fund as have not heretofore been 
entrusted to the several counties; and shall make provision, by law, for the distri- 
bution, among the several counties, of the interest thereof. 

*'Sec. -5. If any county shall fail to demand its proportion of such interest, for 
oonimou school purposes, the same shall be re-invested for the benefit of such county. 

"Sec. 6. The several counties shall be held liable for the preservation of so 
much of the said fund as may he entrusted to them, and for the payment of the 
annual interest thereon. 

"Sec. 7. All ti-ust funds, held by the State, shall remain inviolate, and be faith- 
fully and exclusively applied to the purposes for which the trust was created. 

••Sec. 8. The General Assembly shall provide for the election, by the voters of' 
the State, of a State Superintendent of Public Instruction; who shall hold his office 
for two years, and whose duties and compensation shall be prescribed by law." 

The twenty-second section of the constitution, so far as it relates to common 
schools, is as follows : 

"Sec. 22. The General Assembly shall not pass local or special laws, in any of 
the following enumerated cases, that is to say: 

"Providing for supporting common schools, and for the preservation of school 
ftinds," &c. 

The school law has been published in pamphlet form, with notes, &c., by th& 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. At page 26, the second section, embracing 
the consolidation feature, is thus introduced: 

"Sec. 2. By this section, all common school funds, from whatever source derived, 
are consolidated in one general and common fund, to be called the 'common school 
fund.' The county oihcers need therefore no longer keep on their books the several 
cl.'sses of public funds distinct." 

Then follows the act, the first four sections of which are as follows: 

"An act to provide for a general and uniform system of common schools, and 
school libraries, and matters properly connected therewith. 

"Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana, 
That there shall be annually assessed and collected, as the State and county 
revenues are assessed and collected; first, on the list of property taxable for State 
purposes, the sum of ten cents on each one hundred dollars. 

"Sec. 2. The funds heretofore known and designated as the congressional town- 
ship fund, the surplus revenue fund, the county common school fund, and all funds 
heretofore appropriated to common schools, the saline fitnd, the bank tax fund, 
shall, t/Ogetlier with the fund which shall be derived from the sale of the county 
seminal ies, and the property belonging thereto, from the fines assessed for breaches 
of the penal laws of the State, and from all forfeitures which may accrue, all lands 
and other estates, which shall escheat to the State for want of heirs, or kindred en- 
titled to the inheritance, all lands which have been or may hereafter be granted to 
the State, where no special purpose is expressed in the grant, and the proceeds of 
the sales thereof, including the proceeds of the sales of the swamp lands granted to 
the State of Indiana by the act of Congress of 28th September, 1850, and deducting 
the expense of selecting and draining the same, the taxes which may from time to 
timelbc assessed upon tlie property of corporations for common school purposes,, the 
fund arif-ing from the one hundred and fourteenth section of the charter of the State 
Bank of Indiana, and unreclaimed fees as provided by law, shall he denominated the 
#ommon school fund, the income of which, together with the taxes mentioned and 
Bpccifitd in section 1 of this act, shall be applied to the support of common schools. 

"Sec. 3. Tiie several counties of this State shall be held liable for the preserva- 
tion of said fi'nrl, and the payment of the annual interest thereon, at the rale 
•established by law. 

"Sec. 4. Marii civil towiiHliip in the several counties of this State, is hereby 
declared a township for school ))iirposcs, and the trustees of sucli township are 
hereby declared to be ti-ustccs also fov school purjjoses, and their clerk and treasurer 
shall be tlie clerk and ti-casurcr for school purposes also." 

(2) This article is a litoi-al cojiy, mutatis mutandii, of the prior act of Congress 
•f Fcbuary, 1820, authori-z.ing the State of Ohio to sell the school lands, and of the 
act of March, 1827, giving tho same authority to Alabama. 



313 

r 

Another source of dissatisfaction was found in the power of the 
township trustees to assess a tax on the inhabitants of the township 
for the continuance of the schools, after the public funds were ex- 
pended. It was contended that this power of the township trusiees 
interfered with the uniformity required by the constitution. This 
question was brought before the Supreme Court, and the decision 
thereon will appear from the following report of the case, as found 
in the official records: 

Greencastle Township in Pdtnam County and Kercheval, County 
Treasurer. &c., v. Black. 

Complaint by A., filedon behalf of himself and others, againstGreencastle townshipia 
Pulman county, and B., the county treasurer, to enjoin the collection of a tAx 
assessed by said township under s. 130, c. 98, 1 R. S. 1852. The answer of the 
township admitted B.'s tax as stated, but denied the same as to the others for 
whom he sued. It also, admitted facts which B., in his answer denied. It als« 
alledged, by way of estoppel, that B. voted at the election by virtue of whick 
the assessment was made. 

Held, that the admissions of the township could not be qualified by B.'s answer. 

Held, also, that a decree, upon demurrer to the answers, enjoining the collection of 
"all and any of the taxes named in the complaint," was too broad. 

Held, also, that B. was not estopped, by having voted at the election, from denying 
the legality of the assessment. 

Section 1.30, c. 98, 1 R. S. 1852, which provides that "the voters of any township 
shall have power . t any general or special meeting, to vote a tax for the purpose 
of building or repairing school houses, and purchasing sites therefor, providing 
fuel, furniture, maps, apparatus, libraries or increase thereof, or to discharge 
debts incurred therefor, and for continuing their schools after the public funds 
shall have been expended, to any amount not exceeding annually fifty cents on 
each one hundred dollars of property, and fifty cents on each poll," is, as to the 
mode of levying tax and paying tuition, repugnant to the constitution. 

The disci-etion of courts is more restricted in applying the rules of construction t« 
a plan of government contained in a written constitution, than in the con- 
struction of statutes. 

In the construction of the constitution, words must be understood to have been used 
in their natural sense. 

In the construction of the constitution, courts have nothing to do with the argu- 
ment from inconvenience — their duty being simply to declare what the constitu- 
tion has said. 

Note. — The opinion given in this case on overruling the petition for a rehearing, 
was delivered on the IGth day of January, 185-5, but is inserted immediately after 
the original opinion, by request of the court; and the syllabus applies to both opin- 
ions. 

APPEAL from the Putnam Circuit C airt. 

HovEY. J. — Alexander Black filed a complaint in the Putnam 
Circuit Court, on behalf of himself and other resident citizens of 
Greencastle township, in Putnam county, for the purpose of enjoin- 
ing the collection of a tax assessed by said township, under the 
130th section of the 9;5th chapter of the 1st volume of the revised 
statutes. 

The complaint states, that at the April election, 1853, a proposi- 
tion was submitted by the trustees of said township to the voters 
thereof, for the purpose of assessing a tax of 15 cents on each 100 



314 

dollnrs'' worth of property, and 25 cents on each poll in the town- 
ship, tor common scliool purposes; that they voted in favor of such 
assessment, and that the same was accordinuly assessed by the 
ti-nstees. That Bhick's taxes nnder said assessment amounted to- 
26 dollars and 21) cents, and the other citizens for whom he sued 
to Ij'JdO dollars; that a duplicate had issued to the count}- treasurer 
ko collect and pay over said taxes to the township; and that the 
township was threatening to collect, and would collect it, unless re- 
strained. Tlie complaint avers, that the levy and taxation were 
not uniform throu^ihout the State, and concludes with a prayer for 
an injunction. 1'he complaint is sworn to. 

Greencastle township answers in two paragraphs. In the first 
tiie answer denies the complaint generally, except as to express ad- 
missions. It then sets out a special meeting in May. 1S53, at v\hich 
the voters voted a tax for the purpose of ''building school houses, and 
purchasing sites therefor, providing fuel and for continuing schools, 
after the public funds might be expended," of the same amount as 
stated in the complaint, and that a duplicate of such tax had been 
placed in the hands of the county treasurer lor collection. It admits 
Black's tax as stated, but denies the same as to others for whom he 
sues ; denies threats, but admits that the treasurer will collect, and 
avers that he ought not to be enjoined. 

The second paragraph alleges that Black was a voter, and voted 
at the election; and insists that he is estopped from denying the le- 
gality of the assessment. 

Kercheval, the treasurer, answers b}" denying the complaint in 
general terras, but admits the dupll ate, with Black's tax, and that 
ke intends to collect it, unless restrained. 

Demurrers were filed to each paragraph, assigning for cause that 
they did not contain sufficient answer or defense to the mattera 
charged in the complaint. 

The court sustained the demurrers, the defendants failed to make 
farther answer, and upon the filing and approval of an injunction 
bond, the court decreed a perpetual injunction, " prohibiting and 
enjoining the defendants from collecting all and any of the taxes 
named in the complaint." The defendants appealed. 

The answers of the township and Kercheval must be considered 
as one. The admissions of the township, the party in interest, can 
not be qualified by the answerof Kercheval, who is only her agent 
in collecting the taxes. In this view the proceedings substantially 
admit that the township levied the tax under the ISOth section ; 
tliat a duf)licate of that tax was in the hands of Kercheval, for col- 
lection ; that Black's tax, as stated in his complaint, was embraced 
in the duplicate, and that, unless restrained, they intended to pro- 
ceed in making collections. Wo do not think the variance in re- 
gard to the time of holding the election material, and we deem it 
nnnecessary to notice at length several minor poinls rai'^ed by 
counsel in regard to the [)h'a(liiiL'B. The admissions by the plead- 
ings raise three questions for consideration. 



315 

First. I3 Black estopped from deiiyiug the legality of the assess- 
ment ? 

Second Is section 130, under which the tax was assessed, con- 
stitutional? 

Third. Is the decree sustained by the admitted tacts? 

1. Black voted at the election, and the appellants insist that he 
is thereby estO|)ped from denying its legality. The case oi Ri'x v. 
iS/yM«. (5 Barn, and Cress. 240, is cited to support this position ; 
but that case only decides that a corporator vviio attends and votes 
at a meeting for the election of officers of a borough, will not bo 
permitted to impeach the title of the persons there elected, on ac- 
count of the want of title in the presiding officers at sucii election. 
In this case. Black not only attempts to deny the rigfit of officers to 
preside at the election, but also the constitutionalty of the law au- 
tiiorizing it to bo holden. We cannot carry the doctrine of estoppel 
to tlie extreme of denying him that right. 

This brings us to the second and principal question in the cause. 

2. For the purpose of understanding the fall purport and meaning 
of ihe sections m our present constitution in regard to common 
schools, it may not be improper to take a cursory view of the school 
system in this State. 

The constitution of 1S16 asserted that knowledge and learning, 
generally diffiised throughout the community, were essential to a 
free government ; and provided that it should l)e the duty of tlie 
General Assembl}^ as soon as circumstances would permit, to pro- 
vide by law for a general system of education, ascending in a regu- 
lar gradation from township schools to a State University, wherein 
tuition should be free, and equally open to all. See sections 1 and 
2, art. 9, 

As early as 1818 the General Assembly passed laws in regard to 
public schools, and the Revised Statutes of 1824, 1831, and 183S, 
contain "'acts incorporating congressional townships, and providing 
for public schools therein." In the R. S. 1843 the school laws 
were revised and amended in a lengthy chapter, under the title of 
"common schools," au'l in IS49 an "act to increase and extend 
the benefit of common schools," was enacted, which considerably 
enlarged the former system, but no county was to be bound by its 
provisions until it was assented to by a majority of its popular vote. 
Several counties in the State never assented to this act. Besides 
these, many local laws were enacted, for the management of schools 
in difterent counties and townships throughout the State, dissimilar 
in many respects to each other, and to the general law. 

These laws gave the officers having control of the system the 
maiuigemeni of the school funds, the right to rent and sell school 
lands, and in some instances to levy taxes for the support of schools. 

Under their operation, large sums of money were waited, and 
some of the most valuable lands in the State sacrificed, without 
producing any perceptible results. Every step in legislation scL'med 
to involve the system in greater expense and difficulty, until ineffi- 



316 

ciency, confusion and waste seemed to be the legitimate offspring 
of our louislation on the subject. Such was ihe well known condi- 
tion of ihe common school system, when the constitutional conven- 
tion of 185 1 adopted the ibllowing sections : 

"Knowledge and learning, generally diffused throughout a com- 
munity, being essential to the preservation of a free govefnment, it 
shall be the duty of the General Assembly to ' encourage, by all 
suitable means, moral, intellectual, scientific, and agricultural im- 
provement; and to provide by law for a general and uniform sys- 
tem of common schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge, 
and equally open to all." Sec. 1, art. 8. 

" The General Assembly shall not pass local or special laws, in 
any of the following enumerated cases, that is to say 

•'Regulating the jurisdiction and duties of justices of the peace, 
and ot constables," &c. 

'* Providing for supporting coinmon schools, and for the preserva- 
tion of school funds," &c. Sec. 122, art. 4. 

The object of both these sections was to provide, not only that a ^ 
••'general system of education" should be established, as was re- 
quired by the constitution of IS 16, but that such system should bo 
both general and uniform ; and for the purpose of more efiectually 
eecuring that r.^sult, the 22d section places it beyond the power of 
the General Assembly to pass local oi special laws, '* providing 
for supporting commort schools." 

In compliance with the requirements of the foregoing constitu- 
tional provisions, the legislature that succeeded the adoption of the 
constitution, passed "an act to provide for a general and uniform 
eystem of common schools and school libraries, and matters prop- 
erly fonnected therewith," approved June 14, 1852. Tiie following 
are the firtt and second sections of that act: 

" Se tion 1 . Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State 
of Indiana^ That there shall be annually assessed and collected, as 
the State and county revenues are a'^sessed and collected, first, on 
the list of property taxable for State purposes, the sum often cents 
on each one hundred dollars. 

"Sec. 2. The funds heretofore known and designated as the 
congressional township fund, the surplus revenue fund, the county 
common school fund, and all funds heretofore appropriated to com- 
mon Bl-hools, the salinefund, the bank tax fund, shall, together with 
the i'und which shall be derived from the sale of county seminaries 
fend the proj)erty belonging thereto, from the fines assessed for 
breaches of ttie penal laws of the State, and from all forfeitures 
which may accrue, all lands, and other estates which shall escheat 
to the State for want ol heirs or kindred entitled to the inheritance, 
all lands which have been, or may hereafter be granted to the State 
where no special purpose is expressed in the grant, and the pro- 
ceeds of the salijs thereof, iiududing the ]>roceeds of the sales of the 
Bwainp lands grantc^l to tlie State of Inrliana by the act of Congress 
of 28 h Septeud.>er, 1^50, and deducting the exj)ense8 of selecting 



317 

and draining; the same, the taxes which may from time to time be 
assessed upon the property of corporations tor common school pur- 
purposes, the fund arising^ from the n4tli section of the charter of 
the State Bank of Indiana, and unrechiimed fees as provided by 
law, shall be. denominated the common school fund, the income of 
which, together with the taxes mentioned and specified in the first 
section of this act, shall be applied to the support of common 
schools." 

From the sources contained in these sections the common school 
fund was to be derived, and provision is made in other sections of 
the same act for the equal distribution of the proceeds arising from 
this fund, among the several counties. Thus far there is no contro- ' 
versy as to the act being general and uniform throughout the State. 
But the principal question in this case arises out of the 130th sec- 
tion of the same act. which provides that — 

" The voters of ai^y township shall have power at any general or 
special meeting, to vote a tax for the purpose of building or repair- 
ing school houses, and purchasing sites therefor, providing fuel, 
furniture, maps, apparatus, libraries or increase thereof, or to dis- 
charge debts incurred therefor, and for continuing the schools after 
the public funds shall have been exp'-'uded, to any amount not ex- 
ceeding annually fifty cents on each one hundred dollars of property, 
and fifty cents on each poll." 

Is this section constitutional 1 We are of the opinion that it is 
not 

Before we proceed to the consideration of tlie constitutionality of 
this section, we would remark that its phraseology seems to indicate 
that the legislature did not regard the taxes to be raised by it as 
being of a public character ; for one of the specified causes for ma- 
king the assessment is, " for continuing their schools after the pub- 
lic fund shall have been expmded ;" thus making a distinction be- 
tween the- ''public funds," and those contemplated by the section. 

It was evidently the intention of the framers of the constitution 
to place the common school system under the direct control and 
supervision of the State, and make it a quasi department of the State 
government". 

To < ontrol and manage this department, the constitution provides 
for the election of a Superlntendeat of Public Instruction by the 
popular vote, and enjoins upon the legislature the duty of provi- 
ding by law for a general and uniform system, wherein tuition is 
to be without charge, and open to all. Placed in this condition, 
the State occupies the position of a parent to her children, whose 
duty it is to see that all are equally provided with the means of ed 
ncation. For the pur})03e of supplying such means, the constitution 
authorizes her not only to use the funds heretofore set apart for that 
purpose, but to compel the elder brothers of the same family, by "a 
unifonn and equal rate of assessment and taxation," to aid her in 
carrying out the scheme ; and as the diffusion of knowledge and 
learning is regarded by the consti'ution as " essential to the preser- 



318 

vation of free governments," it would seem but jnsi tliat those wlio 
enjoy sucli a government shoiiKl eciually assist in contributi!Jg to its 
preservation. The inliabitanis of one t-ounty or township should 
not be compelled to bear greater burdens than are borne by all. 
Again : if the pi'ovisions of section 130 are to be regarded a^ con- 
stitutional, the unilormity of the common school system would be 
at once destroyed. In some townships taxes would be assessed by 
vote, and in others Jiot ; in some, a suificient amount might be 
raised to support their schools six. nine or twelve months; so that 
there would really exist no uniformity eitlier as to the time the 
school should be i<ept, or as to the amount of taxes to be paid bj 
the inhabitants of the respective townships. 

But the want of uniformity M'ould not be the only evil resulting 
from such a construction, as the power of controlling schools would 
necessarily, to a great extent, pass from the State and the Superin- 
tendent into the hantls of the local authorities of the diflerent town- 
ships. Should the legislature pass a law for ilie assessuient of a 
mere nominal tax, (a supposition not remote from probability,) the 
whole sciiool system would be left to the mercy of a popular vote 
of the different townships ; and thus all the evils of the old system 
which were intended to be avoided by the new constitution — ine- 
quality in education, inequality of taxation, laciv of UTiiformity in 
schools, and a shrinking Irom legislative responsibilities, would be 
the inevitable result. 

It is useless to urge that the operation of section 130 is and might 
be uniform throughout the State. The character of its provisions 
renders ^:uch a result impossible; and even if it should so happen 
that every townsliip in the State sliould assess the same rate ot tax- 
ation, the assessment would not be the less unconstitutional on ac- 
count of such an accident. 

Jt has long since been beautifully declared by high authority, 
that " a corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit.'' An unconsti- 
tuti' nal provision cmnot be the basis of lawful proceedings. 

The counsel for the appellants contend that if cities, towns, and 
counties can assess taxes for local purposes, the same power must 
necessarily bflongto incorporated towusinps. We are not prepared 
to deny tluit the legislature might confer such power upon them for 
certain local purposes; but where the taxes when collected are to 
be used for State purposes, the constitution requires that — 

•"' The General Assembly shall provide, by law, for a unif)rm and 
equal rate of assessment and taxation ; and shall prescrdje such 
regulations as shall secure a just valuation for taxation of a|l prop 
erty, both real and personal, excepting such only for municipal, 
educational, literary, scientific, religious, or charitable purposes, as 
may be specially exempted by law." Sec. I, art. 10. 

The piiraseology of this section shows that it was not intended 
to apply to local assessments. The wcu-ds "•unilbrm and equal rate 
of assessment and taxation,'* an:l "all property, both real and per- 



319 

sonal," qlearly refer to general assessments to be marie for the State 
at lai'ge. 

We have refrained from noticing cases of seeming similarity in 
other States, as those cases were not controlled by constitutions 
like ours. In several of the eastern States, it is understood that 
townships now and for many years past, have exercised powers sim- 
ikir to those claimed in this case by Greencastle township ; but by 
an examination it will be found that there is scarcidy a shade of 
similitude between their constitutions and ours, in regard to schools 
and taxation. 

The ditticulties anticipated by counsel from the construction which 
we have reluctantly felt constrained to adopt, do not seem to us in- 
surmountable, as we can easily conceive of a constitutional system 
which would work no injustice to any one. But even if such a sys- 
ti'Ui could not be devised, we will not bond the constitution to suit 
the law of the hour. 

3. The decree enjoining '■ all and any of the taxes named in the 
complaint," is too broad. While the answers admit Black's taxes 
as stated in the complaint, they pointedly deny the taxes of others 
for whom he sues, and his authority to sue for them. These iacts 
are admitted by the demurrers, and the injunction should be con- 
fined to the taxes assessed against Black. 

Per Curaim — The deer e is athrmed as to the taxes assessed 
against Black, and reversed as to the taxes assessed against those 
for whom he sues. Cause remanded, &c. 

H. Secrest, D. R. Williamson, and D. R. Eckels, for the appel- 
lants. 

J. Cowgill and D. McDonald, for the appellee. 

This decision was deemed so tatal to the efficiency of the law of 
l!?5'2, that a petition for rehearing was presenied, and the case was 
re-argued. On this petition the following decision was made by 
the court : 

Greencastle Township i; Putnam County and Kercheval, 
County Treasurer, fee. v. Black. 

On Petition for a Rehearing. 

Stuart, J. — The facts and pleadings so fully appear in the for- 
mer ijpinion, that it is not Ufcessary to repeat them. The case was 
twice elaborately aigued, once on printed brief when submitted, 
and afterwards orall}^ . 

Judge llovey, who delivered the opinion of the court on that 
occasion, bein<: no longer on the beucli, it is not improper to say 
that his position as .a distinguished member of the constitutional 
convention, justly imparted great weight to his opinions on ques- 
lions of coubtitutiunal construction. 



320 

The petition Tor a rehearing respectfully reviews the positions of 
the court, and ingeniously point:^ out what are conceived to be 
errors in coming to the conclusions announced. To a question of 
finch magnituie, it is natural that the public attention should be 
directed. The important interests involved and the feeling excited 
rentier it highly proper that we should carefully review our former 
ruling. 

It is due, perhaps, for another reason. Feelings not very favor- 
able to the candid discussion of abstract questions have been in- 
voked. A co-ordinate department, with what degree of taste or 
propriety does not become ns to say, has officially questioned the 
correctness of the decisions in the school cases. It can not, theie- 
tore, foil to be more satisfactory to the parties, and to the public, 
that we re-examine the question on its merits, without much regard 
to the course of reasoning adopted on the former occasion, or that 
pursued by counsel. 

In onler more accurately to mark the path of inquiry, it is pro 
posed to examine : 

1. The rule of construction applicable to written constitutions. 

2. The constitutional provisions on the subject of common 
schools, gratuitous tuition, and school tax. 

3. Whether the school law is, in these respects, conformed to 
the constitution. 

Preliminary to these inquiries, a few explanatory observations 
seem to be demanded. 

We are fully aware that to declare an act which treats of schools, 
(a subject so closely interwoven with the interests and feelings of 
society), uncon>^titutional, is to assume the gravest responsibility. 
Still, when such questions are presented, they must be met. Par- 
ties urge a decision, and we have no means of escape. It is not a 
crisis of our seeking, but one forced upon us in the regular course 
of judicial duty. When such a question does arise, it is surely not 
the first duty of the courts to tax their ingenuity to explain away 
the constitution, in order to accommodate a favorite theory. If 
there be any form of words which should be held sacred, it is the 
plain language of the fundamental law. "It is the rule and com- 
mission by which both legislators and judges are to proceed." 2 
Dallas S04. The courts dare not deal with that instrument in a 
"double sense." In giving it construction, they must not bend to 
any outside pressure, real or simulated. Such judicial delinquency 
wouM inflict infinitely more serious evils than any temporary in- 
convenience which may flow from adherence to the terms of the 
constitution. 

A correct solution of the school questions has been a subject of 
anxious solicitude with the court. They would gladly have received 
light from any legitimate source. At the instance of the judges, 
the cause was argued orally in addition to the printed briefs. They 
were deeply sensible that the construction of an instrument adopted 
with such unanimity by the [;eople, because it was supposed capa- 



821 

ble of shedding its blessings and protection over all, was among tlie 
very gravest of judicial duties. Others may look at such questions 
through mediums tinged, and consequently perverted, with pecuni- 
ary, political, or educational considerations. Not so with the 
courts. Their vision is bounded by authority; their*path of inquiry 
hedged in with rules of judicial construction, 'I'o disturb these 
rules, is to tmsettle everything. Beyond tliem it is seldom the 
courts can either safely or properly penetrate. " They must be 
governed by the principle of law, and not by the hardship of any 
particular case." When the rule of" law is plain, no matter how 
cogent the reasoning from other sources ma.y be, the argument from 
inconvenience is wholly inadmissible. The rule must, in such cases, 
be applied without regard to what interests may thereby be built 
up, or what prostrated. 

Men who reason on such questions, not from principles, but re- 
sults, are but poorly fitted to solve constitutional difficulties. Of 
course, their praise or censure, for such reasons, must always be a 
matter of equal indifference. Strictures predicated upon conse- 
quences, besides the doubtful quality of their taste and logic, pro- 
ceed upon two very grave mistakes. The one is, that the people 
are not sufficiently intelligent to understand the true issue; the 
other, that the judges can be overawed in the disch'arge of their 
public duty. And yet it would be the greatest misfortune to the 
people of the State, if the judges could bo thus intimidated. It 
requires but a moment's pause to estimate the evils of a pliant 
judiciary, and the necessity of judicial independence. That very 
independence which, adhering strictly to principle, conflicts with 
the real or fancied interests of to-day, may be th'-ir only shield from 
destruction to-morrow. Whoever looks thus to expediency only 
in legal questions, must often find himself in opposition to the 
court>. 

That we have not been needlessly refining in constitutional con- 
struction, is clearly shown, we think, by the authorities. We pro- 
ceed then to the first inquiry. 

1. What is the rule of construction applicable to written con- 
stitutions ? 

Newell V. The People^ 3 Seklen 9, is a very important and 
instructive case on this subject. It is of recent date (May, 1852). 
The signal ability with which it is discussed, both by counsel and 
the court, makes it the leading case, embracing the modern learning 
on the construction of written constitutions. . 

The facts were tliese : 

The constitution of the State of New York of 1S46, authorized 
the surfilus revenues of the canals to be applied in each fiscal year 
to their enlargement, in such manner as the legislature should 
direct. The State was prohibited from contracting a debt, save for 
certain specified purposes, and to a limitted amount (one million). 
The act of 1851 assumed to authorize the issuing of certificates to 
the amount of 9,000,000 dollars, for the redemption of which the 



322 

annual surplus revenues of the canals wore pledged. In short, 
the law, instead ot expendino; the revenues annually, each iiscal 
year, as ihey accrued, anticipated ihem, in order to enlarcre the 
works more speedily; imd pledii;ed the surpUis revenues for the 
payment of these anticipations. And the cpiestion was, could 
the revenues be thu santicipatcd consistently with the constitu- 
tion? 

It was admitted on nil hands that the speedy enlargement of the 
canals was a matter of urgent public necessity, to accommodate the 
increased businct^s. It was further jdausibly urged that the surplus 
revenues of the canals were still set apart for their enlargement. 
That the manner in which they were to be applied was given uu- 
rcstrictedl}^ to the discretion of the legislatuie. That this anticipa- 
tion was a proper application of that fund. That the nine mil'ions 
was not a debt borrowed on the credit of the State, but on the 
credit of that fund. And that, thereibre, it was in conformity with 
the plan for finishing these works prescribed by the constitution. 

Eut the court held that the act contravened, among other things, 
the constitutional provision requiring the remainder of the canal 
revemies to be applied in each fiscal year, and also the provision 
prohibiting the St te from contracting a debt. 

'J he law has its maxims, which are to bo granted without argu- 
ment or discourse. 1 Inst. IC. In the ai'gnments of conns. 1 and 
the opinions of the judges, in the Newell case, the legal maxim8 
bearing on the construction of written constitutions are collected. 
Tliongh gleaned mostly from American authorities, they were 
treated as settled beyond the reach of discussion. And well tliey 
might be, considering the sources from which they emanated, and 
the obvious C(jrrectness of the principles announced. 

Thus it was urged in argument, and so held by the judges, that 
tlie discretion of courts is more restricted in applying the rules of 
construction to a ]);an of government contained in a written con- 
stitution, ihan in the construction of statutes. And the reason is 
conclusive'. Statutes are often hastily and unskilfully drawn, and 
thus need construction to make them sensible. But constitntions 
import the utmost disi-rimination in the use of language. "They 
are the ]iernuinent will of the people, intended for the guidance of 
posteiity." 'J'hus, Marshall, C. J., in relation to the Constitution 
of the United States: '*'J'hc framers of the constitution, and the 
people who adojjted it, must be understoo:l to have employed words 
in their natural sense, and to have intended what they said." 
Gihhons v. Orjden, 9 AVlieat. 188. 

S'l the dissenting opininn of i^ronson, J., in TJiP People v. Purely^ 
2 Hill 31. subsequently declared in the Coui't of Errors to be the 
law. and cited with marked ajjprobation in Newell v. 'I he People. 
''Written constitutions will soon become of little value, if their 
injunctions may be ligiitly overlooked ; and the experiment of set- 
ting a boundary to jiower will ]n-ovc a failure." 



323 

Airain, in the same case, the Court of Errors, in rcversinir the 
judguunt of the iSnprenie Coni-t, an?! a<{optin'iJ; the dissenting 
opinion of Bionson, J., say: "If the courts venture to substitute 
for the clear language of the instrument, tluii' own notions ot what 
it should have been, or was intended to be, there will be an end of 
written constitutions." Purely v. The Peojjle, 4 Hill 384. In 
consti-ning tlie language of the constitution, courts have nothing to 
do with the argument from inconvenience. Their sole <luty is to 
declare, ita lex scripia est — thus saith the constitution. *il Wend. 
5S4. 

These may be regarded as well-settled legal maxims, governing 
the construction of written constitutions. Keeping these maxims 
in view, let ns inqnire: 

2 What are the constitniional provisions on the subject of com- 
mon schools, gratuitous tuition, and school tax? 

The constiuiiion enjoins on the legislature, ''to provide by law 
for a general and uniform system of common schools, wherein tui- 
tion shall be without charge, and equally open to all." Section 1, 
article 8. 

'idle chief duty here enjoined, viz, that *'tuiiion is to be without 
charge," is specially noticeable. To enalile the .State to discharge 
this duty, a 1 the trust funds are consolidated in-o what is called the 
■•'common school fund," the income of which is inviolably appro- 
priated to the support of common schools. Sections 2, 3, article 8. 
Had there been no fund provided, the power of taxation to accom- 
plish the object would necessarily be implied. 

Should the fund provided prove insufficient, the same rule ap- 
plies. To snpply Mdiatever may lie needed beyond the income of 
the common school fund, the pow'i and duty to levy a tax are 
equally clear. 

Common scliools are thns to hv established as i Sta^'c institution, 
under the Superintendent of Public Instruction, as its official head 
(section 8, article 8), and to be supported as to tuition by State 
funds. 

In the mode of levying tax, hoAvcver, the State is restricted. 
Taxes for school purposes Can not be levied by local or special law 
Section 'i*2. article 4. They must be levied by general law, of uni 
form oi)eraiion throughout the State Section 'i3, article 4. And 
upon a iinilortn and equal rate of assessment and taxation. Sec- 
tion I, article 10. These restrictions the people have deemed it 
expedient to im|Hise on the legislature. It is not our pur|)ose to 
inquire into their policy. That they are part of the fundamental 
law, is enough for us. It becomes ns to see that they are not im- 
paii-etl. 'J'he language is plain, clear, and consistent. If these 
restrictions can be explained away or evaded, then "it may be set 
down as an established fact, that the Engli-;h language is too poor 
to frauie fundaiuental laws which shall limit the powers of the 
legislature." 

We come then to the last inquiry, viz.: 



324 

3. Wlicthcr the 130th section of the school law, as to the mo;le 
ot levying tax ani paving tuition, is in conformity to the constitu- 
tion % 

We thus confiae it to tlie sisigle points of fultioji- and tax, for the 
sake of perspicuity. The other parta of tlie section can hardly be 
said to be before ns; nor have we, consequently, examined how far 
they may be affected by the ruling in the Maize case'. At all 
events, if the tax in this case is vicious for any purpose, it being 
inseparable, vitiates the whole section. 

The school law, section 130, as to tax and tuition, provides that 
the voters of any township shall have power, at any general or 
special meeting, to vote a tax, &c., for continuing their schools 
after the public funds shall have been expended, &c. 

We now deal solely with the tax as a common school fund. 
Keeping in mind the obligation of the State to furnish tuition free, 
was the tax voted by Greencastle township a constitutional mode of 
discharging that duty? We arc very clear that it was not. 

That the tax so levied is a township tax, in contradistinction to 
a State tax, needs no illustration. This distinction is recognized 
in the constitution Section 22, article 4.. It is 5, tax levied in the 
township by the voters, upon tiie pro})erty and polls of the town- 
ship. It is, thereiore, strictly a township tax. 

• Now is this tax to be appropriated ? I'he purpose is, to continue 
the schools in Greencastle township after the public funds have . 
been exhausted. This '^ continued school" either belongs to the 
common school system, or it is independent. If it belongs to the 
State system, then here is a State school supported, not by common 
school funds, but by a township tax. It is not a State tax, levied 
on all the property of the State; but a specific and local tax, levied 
by vote, for the support of that part of the common school system 
embraced in Greencastle township. Tuition is not without charge, 
it is not paid by the Stale, nor out of State or common school funds. 
The peoj/le of Greencastle township pay their tuition, over and 
above their proi)ortion of the State tax for common school purposes. 
It is a discriminating tax on the property and polls of Greccastle 
to^^nshi]). 

The 130th section of the law levying such a tax for such a pur- 
pose, is in direct conflict with the express terms of the constitution, 
and void. 

But it may be said that the "continual school," nfter the [)ublic 
funds have been expended, d'ics not belong to the common school 
Bystem, but it is a [)rivate S(diool, inilependent of the system. The 
definition is accepted; and what then ? It conflicts with another 
section of the constitution. It was formerly not nncommon io find 
an insurance company chartered, or attempted to be, under the 
modest title of a State road. To prevent such h.'gislation, the <;on- 
vention adopted the 19th section, article 4. " Every act shall em- 
brace but one subject, and matters properly (connected tiaruwith. 
]3ut if any subject shall be embraced in an act which shall not be 



325 

expressed in the title, sucli act shall be void only for so much there- 
of as shall not be expressed in the title." The title of the school law 
is, *• An act to provide for a general system of common schools'and 
school libraries, and matters properly connected therewith." This 
title does not embrace independent schools ; nor, if it did, are they 
matters properly connected therewith. The very idea of an inde- 
pendent school is that of a school unconnected with any system. 
On the hypothesis, then, that it is an independent school, it is a dis- 
tinct subject-matter embraced in the act, but not expressed in the 
title, nor properly connected with the school system. It is theretbre 
clearly in conflict with section 19, article 4, and void. 

Taking the rules of construction and the constitution in the one 
hand, and the law in the other, the result is more strongly marked 
than in the Newell case. Thus, whether it be regarded a as tax to 
support the State system, or a tax to support an independent school, 
it is equally unconstitutional. Of this we are clear beyond all doubt. 
In such a case of incompatibility between the law and the constitu- 
tion, " the court would be unworthy of its station, if it could be 
unmindful of the high obligation which that station imposes." 

Nor does this conclusion as to the invalidity of the law, imply 
any disrespect to any other department. Neviell v. The People^ 
supra. 

The uniformity of the laws, as required by the constitution, is 
easily understood. That no law can be devised to operate uni- 
formly in all respects, is quite clear. A school in the city, and in 
the rural districts, would be a very different thing, under any law. 
School houses could not be built in different localities, of the same 
size and material, for the same price. But there is a wide distinc- 
tion between the want of uniformity incident to different circum- 
stances, and that want of uniformity created by the law itself. 
When the State has raised a common school fund by uniform assess- 
ment and taxation, she has attained the contemplated uniformity in 
that respect. When she has distributed the fund equally to all en- 
titled to it, she has attained uniformity in that respect; and so of 
everything else in which uniformity is attainable. 

But when a tax is levied in one township for common school 
purposes, which is not a State tax, and may not be so levied on the 
taxable property of the State, the law itself creates the want of 
uniformity. Such diversity, where uniformity is attainable, is in 
violation of the constitution. The meaning of the instrument is 
plain. The burdens to support the system must be apportioned, 
and the funds distributed generally and uniformly to all. 

Another source of confusion and cavil is the similarity of the re- 
striction upon the levy of county and school tax, in section 22, 
article 4. But it is overlooked that the State is not bound to levy 
a State tax to defray the county expenses. Article 6. She is so 
bound as to the tuition in her common schools. Section I, arti- 
cle 8. 

1 D. J.— 23 



326 

It is impliedly affirmed in what has been said, that the State 
may by tax provide public funds to any extent she thinks proper. 
She'now levies 10 cents ; she may make it 10 dollars on the hun- 
dred. Her power to do so is a necessary sequence. 

On the subject of popular votinii on laws — in this instance voting 
a tax — we have nothing to add to what was said in the Maize case. 
We believe the theory of such voting unsound and untenable, and the 
reasoning of the court in the case of The Stale of Vermont v. Parks, 
in which such voting is sought to be vindicated, seems to us wholly 
inconclusive. It leaves out ol view the idea of a representative sys- 
tem as the system. If to that be added the restrictions of our own 
constitution, we think the question closed as to the policy of this State. 
In thecaseunderconsideration, the voters are authorized to vote a tax. 
Jt is claimed as a popular right. If that be admitted, then carry out 
the principle. If the voters of the township have such aright, so have 
the voters of the county, so have the voters of the State ; and if on 
one species of tax, so on every other ; and if on tax questions, then 
on all questions. The theory of our constitution is representative. 
The people of the townships act by trustees, or other local officers; 
the people of the county, by their county board ; the people of the 
State, by the legislative, judicial, and executive departments. Thus 
the laws operating in counties and townships become efficient com- 
mands, and rules of civil action — not mere permissions, to be dis- 
regarded or otherwise, as the voters may chose to vote. In electing 
members of the General Assembly, the people are all heard upon 
every subject. The executive officers of the State, the counties, and 
the townships, carry out whatever general laws the wisdom of the 
assembly has devised. Thus the people speak, but under the con 
stitution it is through their representatives. 

With singular incongruity, this very school bill, which, contrary 
to the constitution, confers the popular right of voting a tax, takes 
away from the inhabitants, not only the control of their township 
school fund, but appropriates the wliole fund itself. The voting is 
treated as the theoretical idea, the diversion of the township fund, 
the practical illustration of local popular rights. The fund wisely 
donated as a permanent basis for local popular action and control 
in each congressional township, is blotted out. To seal the matter, 
80 that the " murder may not out," it is even attempted to take 
away the private corporate powers of the inhabitants. And the 
courts are upbraided in high places, for upholding the constitution 
and the public faith against such pernicious policy. 

The great difficulty seems to arise from the restrictions in the 
constitution. It is said, for example, that city and county taxes 
come under the same restriction as local taxes for common schools. 
We have already alluded incidentally to this objection, in answer 
to the argument of counsel. In addition, we may observe, that we 
do not readily see how any fair inquirer could arrive at that result. 



327 

It is quite ceitain we have not intimated anything of the kind. 
The constitution recognizes, in various ways, counties, county 
boards, cities, and other municipal corporations, as then existing 
inbtitutions. Of this class is article 6; so, also, more or less directly, 
sections 6 and f22, article 4 ; section 3, article 7 ; sections 4, 5, 6, 
article 8; section 3, article 9; section 6, article 10; sections 13, 
14, article 11 ; section 7, article 15. The 3d and 4th clauses of 
the schedule expressly continue municipal corporations, until modi- 
fied or repealed by the General Assembly. But nowhere is it en- 
joined or implied, that the State shall defray the expenses ol' these 
corporations. She is bound, as before observed, to institute a system 
of common schools wheiein tuition shall be without charge. 

Yet if the provisions of the constitution were imperative on the 
State in regard to the expenses of municipal corporations, what 
could be done? If it were expressly declared, or necessarily im- 
plied, tfiat all taxes for county and city purposes should be assessed 
and collected as State tax, it is not easy to see how the constitution 
could be superseded either by the legislature or the courts, even 
with the aid of the exectitive. It would still be duty of all to 
obey, and of the courts to uphold and adhere to this plain meaning. 

If the restrictions imposed be found impracticable, it belongs 
8olel3' to the people to modify or change them. It is not meet that 
the courts could eflect a change by construction and evasion. But 
these restrictions being new, do not yet work smoothly. Besides, 
the wild latitude of former legislation being kept in view, perhaps 
the parties restrained are a little restive. However that may be, 
these restrictions were imposed deliberately, and for a purpose. 
They are the barriers erected by the people against the encroach- 
ment of the power they have delegated. The people will therefore 
be slow to remove them — leaving it to time to vindicate the wisdom 
and profound policy of the checks thus imposed. For these reasons 
the petition for a rehearing must be overruled, 

GooKiNS, J., was absent. 

Per Curiam. — The petition for a rehearing is overruled. 

These decisions led to a modification of the law of 1852, in which 
by the way other than constitutional imperfections were found. 

The law of 1855, being a revision of the law of 1852, provides, 
in relation to distribution of funds, as follows: 

"Section 97. The Slate Superintendent shall annually, by the 
fourth Monday in April in each year, make out a statement show- 
ing the number of scholars in each county of the State, the amount 
of the income of the common school fund in each county for distri- 
'' bution, and the amount of taxes collected for school purposes, and 
shall apportion the same to the several counties of the State, accord- 
ing to the enumeration of scholars therein, witbout taking into 
eonsideration the congr3Bsional township fund in such distribution.'' 



328 

*' Sec. 101. The treasurer of the several connties shall annuallj^ 
on the third Monday of May, make distribution of the income of 
the common school fund to which his county is entitled, (upon the 
warrant oi the county auditor,) to the several townships and incor- 
pora'ied cities and towns of the county, which payment shall be 
made to the treasurer of each township, and in making the said 
distribution the auditor shall ascertain the amount of the congres- 
sional township fund belonging to each city, town, and township, 
and shall so apportion the income of the common school fund as to 
equalize the amount of available funds in each city, town, and 
township, as near as may be, according to the number of scholars 
therein : Piovidrd^ however^ that in no case shall the income of 
the congressional township fund belonging to an}' congressional 
township, or part of such township, be diminished by such distri- 
bution, and diverted to any other township." 

To show clearly the practical effect of this provision, the Super- 
intendent appends the following note : 

"Section 101. — The requisitions of this section will so far secure 
the equalization of the school funds, that, with perhaps the excep- 
tion of a very few townships, there will be an equal enjoyment on 
the part of the youth of the commonwealth of the educational 
provisions both of the National and State governments. The 
auditors will find no trouble in adjusting this apportionment, with- 
out the labor of giving, in detail, the specific amount of each town- 
ship's share of the two funds, if they will ascertain what the whole 
amount of school funds, both special and common, for the county^ 
on ape?- capita division, will give each scholar, and then ascertain 
whetlier any township's school section will yield a larger dividend 
to its children. It any township should have a larger amount^ 
exclude its number of children and the income of its school section 
fund from the calculation, and proceed with the other towns on the 
consolidation basis of distribution. The design of this 'equalization 
is to secure what the infelicitous phraseology of our contract with 
the general government, in ref -rence to school grants, has deprived 
our youth, ])ut which the present method of bestowing the educa- 
tional dower on our younger sisters evidently shows was the 
parental purpose and intent of Congress, in the educational outfit 
which the older sisters received at her hands on reaching their ma- 
jority. 

In illustration of the above suggestions on the method ot distri 
button , a case may be presented as follows, viz.: 

lu County, (Jonpressioiial Township, 

A. has 300 <jliil<lri;u, and $37.') Con^ressionat township fund, = ^1 25 per scholar. 

B. " -MO " i.'iO ♦• " " _ 75 " 

C. " 84 " i'U '■ " " =; 50 " 

D. " 400 " IW) " •' " _ 25 " 

£. " sao " — • " _ « 



329 

The last four townships have 1)34 children and ^292 of congros- 
eional fund. The common school fund of the county amounts to 
$875 50, which, added to their $292, sc lool section fund, will 
make an aggregate of $1,167 50. This will give them on a pro 
rata division, $1 25 per scholar — the same sum that township A. 
receives ;rom her school section fund — in which case the sam'j 
result is secured either with or without consolidation of A.'s num- 
ber of children and funds with those of the other townships. But 
it the county common school fund be only $828 80, the last four 
townships would get only $1,120 80, which would be but $1 20 
per scholar; a sum less than township A. derives from her school 
section fund, which must not, according to the lOlst section of the 
revised law, be diminished by any process of distribution. Hence 
the propriety of excluding A.'s number of children, and also her 
.amount of special fund from the said calculation." 

The constitutionality of this provision was brought in question, 
^nd decided by the Supreme Court, as lollows : 

Quick and Another v. White- Watee Township. 

By the school law of 1855, the amount derived from taxation for distribution for 

school purposes, must be distributed with the school funds therein specified. 
Upon general principles, and where there is no constitutional restriction, the power 

of the legislative department is complete, and its discretion uncontrollable, in 

disposing of the revenues of the State. 
The constitution requires that the interest derived from the congressional township 

fund shall be distributed to or remain with the congressional townships, alike 

unequally as the fund is itself unequal as between such townships. 
By the constitution, the proceeds of the entire common school fund (of which the 

congressional township fund is to be considered in the distribution a part) are go 

to be distributed as to produce equality and uniformity in the school system 

throughout the State. 
The proceeds of said fund, other than the interest on the congressional township 

fund, must, therefore, under the constitution, be unequally distributed, in order 

to produce the equality required by the constitution in the final result. 
If two provisions of a constitution are irreconcilably repugnant, that which is last 

in order of time and in local position shall be preferred. 
The school law of 1855 conforms to the spirit of the constitution, in the mode of 

distributing the school fund among the several civil townships. 
The school law of 1855 does not conflict with any act of Congress, as it does not 

undertake to vary the distribution of the congressional township fund from the 

■conditions of the grant. 

APPEAL from the Franklin Circuit Court. 

Ferkins, J. — Complaint, and prayer for an injunction restraining 
the auditor and treasurer of Franklin countj^ from distributing the 
school fund, in said county, in accordance with the provisions of the 
school law of 1855. The complaint is by White Water township, 
who, as plaintiff, says, that she was the owner of section sixteen in 
said township — a congressional township — and in 1836 sold the 
same for 7,423 dollars and 36 cents, which sum has since been ad- 
ministered so that the interest has been applied to the support of 
common schools in the township. The complaint then proceeds : 



330 

'♦ And the said plaintiff alleges that the anunal sum collected foT 
distribution for school purposes in said township, of the interest 
accrued on the said fund, up to the 3d Monday of May, l!555, 
amounts to the sum of 435 dollars and 17 cents, which last-named 
sum is in the hands and custody and under the control and man- 
agement of the defendants to this complaint. 

'* And the plaintiff complains tnat said congressional township 
remained, under the law of the State, a body corporate and politic^ 
uniii the passage of the school law of June 14, 1852, by the Gene- 
ral Assembly of Indiana, entitled ' an act to provide for a general 
and uniform system of common schools and school libraries, and 
matters properly connected therewith,' when the corporate powers 
of the said congressional township were repealed, and the said 
plaintiff, by virtue of the general laws of the State, was erected 
into a body corporate and politic; and the plaintiff avers that the 
geograpliical limits of the said White Water township, in Franklin 
county, aie identically the same with those of said congressional 
township number nine, range number one, &c.; and that the inhabi- 
tants ol said White Water township, the plaintiff herein, are the 
owners of said congressional township fund, and are, for the pres- 
ent year, ending on the 3d Monday of May, 1855, entitled to distri- 
bution among them of said sum of 435 dollars and 17 cents, for 
common school purposes in the said township. 

""And said plaintiff further shows that, as nearly as can be 
ascertained, and taking the report of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction of this State, of January 19th, 1855, as the basis of the 
estimate, there are in said White Water township six hundred and 
eight children legally entitled to distribution of the school fund, 
and that thus the per capita distribution of said sum of 435 dollars 
and 17 cents, among said children in said township, for the current 
year, as aforesaid, amounts to a fraction over 71 cents, out of said 
congressionaKtownship fund. 

"And said plaintiff further shows, that by an act of the General 
Assembly of the State of Indiana, approved March 5, 1855, entitled 
'an act to provide for a general system of common schools, the offi- 
cers thereof, and their respective powers and duties, and matters 
properly connected therewith, and to establish township libraries, 
and for the regulation tiereof,' it is provided in the 97th section 
thereof, as follows, to-wit: 'The State Superintendent shall annu- 
ally, by the fourth Monday in April in each ye r, make out a state- 
ment, showing the number of scholars in each county of the State, 
the amount of the income of the common school fund in each 
county for distribution, the amount of taxes collected for school 
purposes, and shall apportion the same to t!ie several counties of 
the State, accor ing to the enumeration of scholars therein, without 
taking into consideration the congressional township fund in such 
distribution.' And also in the lOlst section thereof, as follows to 
wit: ' The treasurer of the several counties shall annually, on the 
3d Monday of May, make distribution of tlie income of the common. 



331 

school fiind to which his county is entitled, (upon the warrant of 
the county auditor,) to the several townships and incorporated cities 
and towns of the county, which payment shall be made to the treas- 
urer of each township, and in making said distribution the auditor 
shall ascertain the amount of the congressional township tund be- 
longing to each city, town and township, and shall so apportion the 
income of the common school fund as to equalize the amount of 
available funds in each city, town and township, as near as may be, 
according to the number of scholars therein, provided, however, 
that in no case shall the income of the congressional township 
fund,' &c., *be diminished by such distribution, and diverted to any 
other township.' 

""And the plaintiif further shows that the common school fund, 
as fixed and defined by law, consists of the congressional township 
fund and the lands belonging thereto; the surplus revenue fund; 
the saline fund, and the lands belonging thereto; the bank tax fund, 
and the fund arising from the 114th section of the charter of the 
State Bank oi Indiana; the fund derived from the sale of the county 
seminaries; and the fines assessed for breaches of the penal laws of 
the State, and from all forfeitures which may accrue; all lands and 
other estate which shall escheat to the State for want of heirs or 
kindred entitled to the inheritance; all lands that may be granted 
to the State, when no special purpose is expressed in the grant, and 
the proceeds ot the sales thereof, including the proceeds of the sales 
of the swamp lands; and taxes that may be assessed on the prop- 
erty of corporations, for common school purposes; and that said 
common school fund does not embrace in any way the general 
school tax levied by the laws of this State, and that such tax is 
therefore not a part of the common school fund of the State 

*' And the plaintifif avers that the said attempted legislation of 
the General Assembly of Indiana, and particularly the sections of 
said act of March 5. 1855, and the proposed plan of distributing 
the general tax levied for common school purposes, are, as plaintiff 
is advised, in contravention of the act of Congress under which the 
plaintiff holds said common school fund derived as aforesaid from 
the sale of said section sixteen, of township nine, range one, &c., 
and also that the same are in contravention of the constitution of 
the State of Indiana, and are therefore void." 

The complaint further shows that the defendants, the auditor and 
treasurer, are about proceeding to equalize among the townships, 
under the law of 1^55, the sum appropriated to Franklin county 
for common schools. It then proceeds: 

"And the plaintiff avers that by reason of the near approach of 
the period of distribution by said defendants, and also for the rea- 
son that when said distribution shall be made, an irreparable wrong 
will be inflicted on the plaintiff, that the present proceeding is a 
case of emergency, in which notice cannot safely be given to said 
defendant, as in other cases; and the plaintiff prays your honor for 
an injunction in this case, to be granted forthwith, on the plaintiff's 



332 

eomplying with such terms as the Court may prescribe, directed to 
said defendants, strictly enjoining them from any such distribution 
of the money arising from the general common school tax, and from 
the common school lund, or any part thereof, as will in anywise 
diminish to the plaintiff the full amount due the plaintiff on a fair 
and equal J9er capita division and distribution of the whole of said 
tax fund, and part of the common school fund aforesaid, without in 
anywise regarding said congressional township fund, or making the 
said proposed illegal effort to equalize such congressional township 
fund throughout the county. And will your honor adjudge the 
distribution to be made in conformity with this complaint and the 
prayer of the plaintiff, and t;rant all other suitable relief in this 
behalf." 

A temporary injunction was granted. On appearing, the defend- 
ants demurred to the complaint. The Court overruled the demur- 
rer, and adjudged that said defendants should be restrained "from 
■making any distribution of the said tax, and of the proceeds of the 
common school fund aforesaid, which would diminish to said plain- 
tiffs their full share thereof, at the rate of 72 cents to each and 
every child in said township, entitled to share in such distribution; 
and that the said defendants, in making their distribution of said 
tax. and the proceeds of said fund, in said county, do allow and 
distribute to the plaintiffs their full share thereof, as if there was 
not any congressional township fund in existence. And it is fur- 
ther considered that the plaintiffs recover of the defendants their 
costs in this behalf. And the said defendants pray an appeal to the 
Supreme Court, which is granted by agreement of parties, without 
bond." 

It is shown, in a part of the complaint not here set out, that if 
the sum appiopriated out of the State funds to Franklin county is 
distributed without reference to the township fund, it will give, out 
of that sum, 72 cents to each child in "White Water township enti- 
tled, &c.; but if distributed upon the principle of equalization, 
under the statute, it will give to each a less sum than 72 cents ; in 
ehort. that if the law of equalization is not regarded, each child in 
White Water township will draw 71 cents from the congressional 
township innd, and 72 cents from the State fund, making from both 
143 cents; while, on the other hand, if equalization under the stat- 
ute is carried out, each child in said township will receive from the 
two sources but 109 cents. 

Sufficient of the complaint has now been embodied in this opinion 
to present the questions to be decided. The point of it may be 
briefly re-stated thus: The Congress of the United States gave the 
sixteenth section of land in each township in this State to the in- 
habitants, respectively, of the townships, for the support of common 
schools. Tlie sections were of unequal value, and on sale produced 
Hnequal amounts, even relatively to the number of scholars in the 
respective townships. They did not, therefore, constitute an equal 
and uniform school fund, producing uniform privileges of educa- 



333 

tion; but the Legislature could not differently distribute the fund, 
because of the terms of the grant of the sections. The State v. 
Springfield Township, ^c, 6 Ind. R. 83. 

The State also possessed a number of funds which she devoted 
to common school purposes, and her Legislature was vested with a 
taxing power, by which it could add to the funds so appropriated. 

Under these circumstances, the Legislature enacted that the sums 
of money arising annually from these latter sources should be just 
as unequally distributed in the townships of the several counties, 
as was the interest on the congressional township fund, but in in- 
verse order, so that the aggregate amount from the two sources, 
viz., the congressional township fund and the appropriations on the 
part of the State, distributed in each township, should, relatively 
to the number of scholars therein, be equal. 

And the main question raised and argued by counsel is, could 
the Legislature enact such a law? Is the enactment constitutional? 

The act, so far as it is objected to, makes an appropriation of 
money from the State treasury to the several counties of the State, 
to be distributed among the townships of those counties in a certain 
manner, and to be expended in supporting common schools. The 
act does not (as perhaps it might) attempt to apply to counties the 
principle applied to townships in distribution. 

The money appropriated for such distribution is derived from two 
sources, viz., taxation, and interest upon funds devoted by the State 
to common school purposes. It is contended, it is true, that the 
sum derived from taxation is not directed to be distributed'with the 
interest upon the named funds, and in terms it is not; but we think, 
taking the whole statute together, that such is the fairly implied 
intention of the Legislature. 

Upon general principles, the power of the legislative department 
is complete, and its discretion uncontrollable, in the disposition of 
the revenues of the State. A treasury seems to be regarded as a 
necessary element in the constitution of, at least, a respectable State 
or nation. I Kent, 189. Without money a government is power- 
less. Possessed of it, its legislature expends it, as to time, place, 
and manner, according to the exigencies of occasions, being answer- 
able only to the electors, the people. And if no provision of our 
constitution interferes, as that constitution, measurably abandoning 
(whether wisely or unwisely, it is not for us to say) the voluntary 
system, has made the education of the children of the State a pub- 
lic duty of the State, the Legislature may appropriate money for 
that purpose to different counties, as it may deem their respective 
wants require. 

We know of no provision of the constitution controlling the dis- 
tribution of that part of the moneys in question derived from taxa- 
tion, unless it be the one requiring laws for the support of common 
schools to be uniform. We do not say that that provision is appli- 
cable to such a case as this. But if it is, it must be conceded that 



334 

it also applies with equal force to the distribution of the interest on 
the permanent funds. 

And, as to this interest, it may be that the sections of the consti- 
tution requiring it to be distributed for the use of schools in the 
several counties, taken by themselves, might fairly imply that it 
should be appropriated among them by some fixed rule of equality; 
but the implication would not reach to the distribution among the 
townships. Article 8, ss. 3, 4, 5, and 6. Those sections, however, 
cannot be construed by themselves. They form a part of the 8th 
article, which, being devoted to one subject, all of its sections must 
be construed together. Regarded thus, we find that the whole sec- 
tion designates what then existing matters should constitute the 
common school fund, naming such as were appropriated by the 
State, and also a certain trust hind, viz., the congressional township, 
donated by Congress to be thus used; 6 Ind. R. 83; which aggre- 
gate fund, it is declared, may be increased, but not diminished. 
We find it further ordains that the interest accruing on all the parts 
of this fund shall be distributed by law among the several counties 
of the State, for the support of common schools, but that the inte- 
rest on one part, viz., the congressional trust fund, shall be distrib- 
uted according to the terms of the gift, and that, by the use of all 
these means, including of course the power of taxation, the Legis- 
lature shall "provide by law for a general and uniform system of 
common schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge, and 
equally open to all." 

We find then, as the result of this investigation, that the consti- 
tution requires — 

1. That the interest on the congressional township trust fund 
shall be distributed, or remain with the townships, alike unequally 
as the fund itself exists unequally in the townships. But, 

2. That the proceeds ot the whole of the common school fund, of 
which, as we have seen, the congressional township is to be con- 
sidered in distribution a part, are to be so distributed as to produce 
equality and uniformity in the school system throughout the State; 
and as a necessity, therefore, 

3. That the proceeds ot said fund, other than the interest on the 
congressional township fund, must be unequally distributed, in order 
to produce the equahty required by the constitution in the final 
result. Instead, therefore, of the prohibition of, we find a command 
for, an unequal distribution of the school fund, other than the con- 
gressional portion of it. 

And, should the point heretofore briefly alluded to now be 
pressed, that the law violates that section of the constitution re- 
quiring laws to be uniform on this subject, a point on which we 
intimate no opinion, it will be a sufficient answer to say that that 
section is, locally and in time, anterior to the sections of the educa- 
tional article in that instrument above epitomized, and hence, it 
irreconcilable with, is so lar abrogated by them. 1+" the different 
sections cannot be " liquidated," and made to stand together, it is a 



335 

"rule of construction, not derived from positive law, but from the 
nature and reason of the thing," "-as consonant to truth and pro 
priety," "that the last in order of time shall be preferred to the 
first." Federalist, No. 78. — Spencer v. ihe State, 5 Ind. R. 41. 
The school law in question conforms to the spirit of the constitution, 
in the manner of distributing the school fund among the townships 
of the several counties of the State. Perhaps the same principle 
is required, by the organic law, to be applied to the distribution 
among the counties themselves. 

The law does not conflict with any act of Congrees, as it does 
not assume to vary the distribution of the congressional township 
fund from the conditions of the grant. 

Stuart, J., dissented. 

Per Curiam — The judgment is reversed with costs. Cause 
remanded, &c. 

J. Morrison, for the appellants. 

G. Holland and J. D. Howland,for the appellee. 

The same question, in a modified form, was decided by the Su- 
preme Court in the following case : 

Quick and Others v. Springfield Township. 

The school law of 1855 is not in contravention of the constitution. 

It was competent for the people, in tlie exercise of sovereign power, in providing 
by the constitution for a general system of common schools, so to discriminate 
between that portion of the people who were already provided with a school fund 
and that portion who were not, as to place them upon an equality. 

The eighth article of the constitution requires that such discrimination shall be 
made. 

The school law does not conflict with the act of Congress granting the sixteenth 
section in the several congressional townships in this State to the inhabitants of 
such townships respectively for the use of schools. 

APPEAL from the Franklin Circuit Court. 

GooKiNS, J. — Springfield Township, in Franklin county, being 
also a congressional township, upon a complaint against Quick, the 
auditor, and Robeson, the treasurer of said county, obiained an 
injunction to prevent said auditor and treasurer from distributing 
the common school funds in said county, as required by the act of 
March 5, 1855. From the order making said injunction perpetual, 
they appeal to this Court. 

The complaint shows that said township has a considerable fund, 
derived from the sixteenth section therein, and the plaiutitf claims 
that the annual income arising from that fund shall not be taken 
into account, as said act requires, in making distribution of the 
revenues ot the State derived from other trust funds and from 
taxation. 

The ground upon which this claim is made is, that the act in 
question is unconstitutional, and also that it violates the act of 
Congress making the grant. 

The eighth article of the constitution is as follows : 



336 

"•Sec. 1. Knowledge and learning, generally diffused tbrongh- 
ont a community, being essential to the preservation of a free gov- 
ernment, it shall be the duty of the General Assembly to encom-ago, 
by all suitable means, moral, intellectual, scientific, and agricultural 
improvement; and to provide by law for a general and uniform 
system of common schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge, 
and equally open to all. 

'• Sec. 2 The common school fund shall consist of the congres- 
sional township fund, and the lands belonging thereto ; 

" The surplus revenue fund ; 

" The saline fund and the lands belonging thereto ; 

" The bank tax fund, and the fund arising from the one hundred 
and fourteenth section of the charter of the' State Bank of Indiana; 

'♦ The fund to be derived from the sale of county seminaries, and 
the moneys and firoperty heretofore held for such seminaries ; from 
the fines assessed for breaches of the penal laws of the State, and 
from all forfeitures which may accrue ; 

•^ All lands and other estate which shall escheat to the State for 
want of heirs or kindred entitled to the inheritance; 

'' All lands that have been, or may hereafter be, granted to the 
State, where no special purpose is expressed in the grant, and the 
proceeds of the sales thereof; including the proceeds of the sales 
of the swamp lands, granted to the State of Indiana by the act of 
Congress of the 'iSth of September, 1850, alter ded-icting the ex- 
pense of selecting and draining the same; 

" Taxes on the property of corporations, that may be assessed by 
the General Assembly for common school purposes. 

*' Sec. 3. The principal of the common school fund shall remain 
a perpetual fund, which may be increased, but shall never be dimin 
ished ; and the income thereof shall be inviolably appropriated to 
the support of common schools, and to no other purpose whatever. 

'* Sec. 4. The General Assembly shall invest, in some safe and 
profitable manner, all such portions of the common school fund as 
have not heretofore been intrusted to the several counties ; and shall 
make provision, by law, for the distribution among the several 
counties of the interest thereof. 

" Sec. 5. If any county shall fail to demand its proportion of 
8uch interest for common school purposes, the same shall be re- 
invested for the benefit of such county. 

*' Sec. 6. The several counties shall be held liable for the preser- 
vation of BO much of the said fund as may be intrusted to them, 
and for the payment of the annual interest thereon. 

'• Sec. 7. All trust funds held by the State shall remain inviolate, 
and be faithfully and exclusively applied to the purposes for which 
the trust was created. 

*'Sec. 8. The General Assembly shall provide for the election, 
by the voters of the State, of a State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, who shall hold his ofiice for two years, and whose duties 
and compensation shall be prescribed by law." 



337 

The following are the two sections of the act referred to, which 
prescribe the mode of distributing the funds : 

" !Sec. 97. The State Superintendent shall annually, by the 4th 
Monday in April in each year, mate out a statement showing the 
number of scholars in each county of the State, the amount of the 
income of the common school fund in each county for distribution, 
and the amount of taxes collected for school purposes, and shall 
apportion the same to the several counties of the State, according 
to the enumeration of scholars therein, without taking into conside- 
ration the congressional township fund in such distribution." 

" Sec. 101. The treasurer of the several counties shall annually, 
on the third Monday ol May, make distribution of the income of 
the common school tund to which his county is entitled, (upon the 
warrant of the county auditor,) to the several townships and incor- 
porated cities and towns of the county, which payment shall be 
made to the treasurer of each township, and in making the said 
distribution the auditor shall ascertain the amount of the congres- 
sional township fund belonging to each city, town, and township, 
and shall so apportion the income of the common school fund as to 
equalize the amount of available funds in each city, town, and 
township, as near as may be, according to the number of scholars 
therein ; Provided, however, that in no case shall the congressional 
township fund," &c., *'be diminished by such distribution and di- 
verted to any other township." Acts of 1855, p. 175. 

We are at a loss to see upon what ground it can be insisted that 
the act in question violates any provision of the constitution. That 
that instrument makes the common school fund to consist in part of 
the congressional township fund and the lands belonging thereto, is 
too plain for argument. Language could not be more explicit. The 
only question that can arise at this point is, is this part of the con- 
stitution valid ? 

It has been several times decided by this Court that the sixteenth 
section belongs to the inhabitants of the congressional township in 
which it is situated. The State v. Newton., 5 Blackf. 455. — The 
State V. Springfield Township., 6 Ind. E,. 83, And in the case last 
referred to it was held, that the act of 1852, which sought to take 
that fund from the township, and to consolidate it with the other 
funds of the State, was void. To these decisions we adhere; but 
the question yet remains, had the people of the State, while seeking 
by a constitution to devise a system which should convey the means 
of instruction equally to every child in the State, the power, by 
virtue of her sovereignty, so to discriminate between those already 
provided with a fund, and those who had no such provision, as to 
place them upon an equality ? In other words, had she any power 
to take notice or cognizance of the congressional township fund in 
any manner whatever? We think she had such power, and that by 
the eighth article of the constitution she exercised it, by declaring 
that the congressional township fund should constitute a part of the 
common school fund ; and that, by the first section of that article, 



338 

she expressly and in terms enjoined it upon the General Assembly 
10 provide by law that the system, with that fund included, should 
be made uniform ; which injunction could not have been obeyed 
without making the discrimination here provided for. 

The argument for the appellee is, that the act of 1855 does, indi- 
rectly, what that of 1852 attempted to do directly ; that it, in effect, 
takes away from the congressional townships their sixteenth section 
fund, and this is complained of as injustice. The argument likens 
it to the case of discriminating between the wealthy and the poor in 
bestowing the favors of the State for the purposes of education, by 
withholding from the wealthy and industrious, and conferring upon 
the poor and indolent. We do not perceive either the logic of this 
argument, or its conflict with the constitution, if well put, so far as 
the act professes to go. There is certainly a material difference 
between taking away what one has, and the refusal to give him 
more. So far as the constitution affects the question, the power to 
discriminate exists, unless it is prohibited, and the prohibition is 
neither pointed out, nor have we been able to find it in that instru- 
ment. It does not conflict with the 23d section of the 4th article, 
which requires all laws to be of uniform operation throughout the 
State; for the act is not only uniform in itself, but it produces uni- 
formity in the subjects upon which it operates. The example which 
the appellee has chosen forcibly illustrates the position assumed ; 
but to our minds the operation of the law seems much like that 
provision of the law of descents which distributes nothing to the 
heir who has received an advancement, until the others are made 
equal — a provision highly favored bv the Courts on account of its 
obvious justice. It is to be remembered that it was not the town- 
ships which paid the price of these lands, but the State, by exempt- 
ing the lands of the general government from taxation for five years 
after their sale. Still, they are invested with the title, and the act 
does not propose to divest it; but it proposes to distribute to the 
other children of the State, until the advancements are made equal. 

What has been said disposes of the other point. The act does 
not conflict with the act of Congress making the grant, nor in any 
manner attempt to interfere with it. 

Stuart, J., dissented. 

Per Curiam. — The judgment is reversed with costs. Cause 
remanded, with instructions to the Circuit Court to dismiss the suit. 

J. Morrison, for the appellants. 

G. Holland and J. D. Ilowland, for the appellee. 

As by the decision of the court in the case of Greencnstle Town- 
ship v. Black, the township trustees could not levy a tax for the 
purpose of continuing the schools, after the public money was ex- 
pended; the law of 18.5.5 contained no provision for township tax- 
ation for tuition purposes, but provided in section 9 for a tax for 
the construction and repair of school houses. 

The constitutionality of this provision was decided by the conrt 
as follows : 



339 

Adamson v. The Auditor and Treasurer of Warren County. 

Township trustees may levy a tax to build school houses. 

A statute conferring authority to tax must be general ; but the exercise of the au- 
thority need not be uniform throughout tqe State. 

The provision of the school law of 1852, authorizing the voters of a township to 
vote a tax for certain purposes, being unconstitutional, such a vote is a nullity; 
but the township trustees may levy a tax for building school houses, without 
regard to the vote. 

APPEAL from the "Warren Circuit Court. 

Perkins, J. — Suit by Adamson against the auditor and treasurer 
of Warren county, to re 'Over back the amount of tax paid by the 
plaintiff, which tax was assessed by the trustees of Mouud town- 
ship, in said county, for the year 1S53, for the building of school 
houses. Tlie tax was assessed by the trustees, after a vote of the 
township, at the April election, in its favor. The complaint was 
demurred to, the demurrer sustained, and the defendant had final 
judgment. 

According to the decision in the Maize case, 4 Ind. R. 342, the 
provision of the school law giving the right to the citizens of the 
township to vote taxes, &c., is unconstitutional. 

According to the decision in Greencastle^ SfC. v. Black, 5 Ind. R. 
557, the provision in that law authorizing township trustees to 
assess taxes for paying teachers of common schools, is unconstitu- 
tional, because the power of voting taxes for that purpose is vested 
by the constitution in the Legislature aione. As to such taxes, the 
law must be uniform throughout the State. Quick v. White Water 
Township, 1 Ind. II. .570. — Quick v. Springfield Township^ id. 
636. 

But the constitutional requirement does not reach to the subject 
of taxes for building school houses. &c. These are left within the 
power of township trustees, and no more uniformity can be required 
as to them, than there can be as to those for building court houses 
and jails in the different counties. The law conferring the authority 
to tax must be general, not special; but the exercise of the power 
need not be uniform throughout the State. That may vary with the 
wants, tastes, and abilities of different localities. 

If, then, the trustees had the power to levy the tax complained 
of, the law conferring it being constitutional, and the section author- 
izing the vote of the citizens was unconstitutional, thus rendering 
the vote a nullity, the tax was legally levied by the trustees, with- 
out regard to that vote. It did not vitiate the exercise of a power 
valid without the vote. 

We think the trustees were empowered to levy the tax. See sec- 
tion 3'2, I R. S. p. 444, in connection with the other provisions of 
the law. See, also, the school law of 1855, section 9. 
What we have already said disposes of the whole ase. 
Per Curiam. — The judgment is affirmed with costs. 
11. A. Chandler, for the appellant. 
B. F. Gregory and J. Harper, for the appellees. 



340 

There was passed in 1855, " An act to authorize the establish- 
ment of free public schools in the incorporated cities and towns of 
the State of Indiana:" 

♦' Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State 
of Indiana, That the several incoiporatecl cities and towns of this 
State, be, and tliey are hereby authorized and empowered to estab- 
lish and support public schools within their respective corporate 
limits, and by an ordinance of such corporation to levy and collect 
such taxes as may be necessary from time to time for the support 
thereof. 

''Sec. 2. It shall be lawful for any such city or town to recog- 
nize any school, seminary, or other institution of learning, which 
has been or may be erected by private enterprise, as a part of their 
system, and to make such appropriation of funds to such school, 
seminary, or institution of learning, and upon such terms and con- 
ditions as may be deemed proper. 

Sec. 3. Nothing contained in this act shall be construed to 
authorize any city or town, by any system adopted under this act, 
to supersede the common schools established under the authority of 
this State, and supported by the public funds. 

- ''Sec. 4. When any tax is required to be levied, as provided in 
this act, the county auditor, upon being required so to do by the 
proper authorities of any city or town, shall enter the said tax upon 
his duplicate, and the treasurer shall proceed to collect the same, 
upon the list of property subject to taxation for State and county 
purposes, and shall pay over the same when collected to the treas- 
urer of such city or town, or other officer properly authorized to 
receive the same. 

" Sec. 5. Inasmuch as existing laws are not sufficient to confer 
the powers herein given, and it is desirable that such powers should 
exist immediately, it is declared that an emergency exists for the 
immediate taking effect of this act; wherefore it shall take effect 
from its passage." 

Under this act schools were established and maintained in most 
of the incorporated towns and cities. We never could, however, 
perceive how this act could be deemed constitutional in view of the 
decision in the case of Greencastle Township v. Black. 

No question, however, was raised on this law until the last term 
of the Supreme Court, when the following decision was made by 
the Court: 

The City of Lafayette v. William M. Jenners. 

APPEAL from the Tippecanoe Circuit Court. 
Perkins, J. — Application for an injunction. Injunction granted. 
Appeal to this Court. 

The facts of the case are as follows: 



341 

In 1855, the Legislature passed an act entitled *• An act to author- 
ise the establishment of i'ree public schools in the incorporated citiefi 
and towns of the State of Indiana." 

The first section of the act reads thus: 

'•Be it enacted, &c., That the several incorporated cities and 
towns in this State be, and they are hereby authorized and empow- 
ered to establish and support public schools within their respective 
corporate limits, and by an ordinance of such corporation to levy 
and collect such taxes as may be necessary from time to time for the 
support thereof." 

Under this section the city of Lafayette levied a tax for the sup- 
port of public schools within the corporation, and was proceeding 
to collect it. Jenners filed his complaint in the Circuit Court, ask- 
ing that the city be enjoined from collecting the tax so assessed 
against him. The injunction, as we have seen, was granted. 

The only question presented in the case is whether the section of 
the statute above quoted is constitutional, and we can scarcely 
regard it as an open one. 

The act of IS52, 1 R. S. p. 444, sec. 130, authorized incorporated 
cities and towns to levy taxes for the support of public schools after 
the public funds had been exhausted, and this Court, on all occa- 
sions, has held that portion of the act unconstitutional. But what 
is the difference between it and the section of the act of 1852 which 
we have quoted? Simply this, and nothing more. The act of 1852 
authorized incorporated cities and towns " to levy taxes for the sup- 
port of their schools after the public funds shall [should] have been 
exhausted." The act of 1855 authorizes " incoporated cities and 
towns" to levy and collect such taxes as may be necessary from time 
10 lime for the support" of "public schools" within their corporate 
limits. The distinction between the acts is without a diflTerence 

If the Legislature cannot, under the constitution, confei upon 
cities and towns the power to levy taxes to continue the free public 
schools of the State, how can it confer upon them power to levy 
taxes to establish and support free public schools? What objection 
exists to the exercise of the first, that does not exist to the second 
act of power? And what was the objection assigned against the 
first? It was not that it M^as conferring upon cities and towns 
power that they were not adapted to exercise, but that it was 
attempting to confer upon them power forbidden to be so conferred 
by the constitution; it was attempting to confer upon them power 
touching a subject as to which the constitution required all power 
to be exercised by the Legislature alone, viz.: the subject of furnish- 
ing tuition in public schools to the children of the State. In Adam- 
son V. The Auditor, <fec., 9 Ind. 174, this Court said, in speaking of 
the law of 1852: 

*' According to the decision in Greencastle^ <!^c., v. Black, 5 Ind. 
R. 557, the provision in that law authorizing township trustees to 
assess taxes for paying teachers of common schools, is unconstitu- 
tional, because the power of voting taxes for that purpose is vested 
1 D. J.— 24 



342 

by tho constitution in the Legislature alone. As to such taxes the 
law must be uniform throughout the State. Quick v. White Water 
Toivnskip, 7 Ind. R. 570. — Quick v. Springfield Township^ id. 636. 

The new constitution does not contemplate two systems of free 
public schools in the State ; one under the control of the State, and 
supported by her trust funds and taxes, and another under the con- 
trol of the various municipal corporations of the State, the cities, 
towns, townships, counties, school districts, and supported by taxa 
tion by them. This would be remitting us back, practically, to 
precisely the condition we were in under the old constitution and 
laws, when the State supported a system of public schools, and 
authorized the counties, &c., severally to raise additional taxes for 
schools if they pleased. The consequence was, the Legislature 
shirked the duty of keeping up an efficient system, contented itself 
with authorizing the municipal corporations to provide schools at 
their option, and hence we had on this subject no uniform rate of 
taxation ; no uniformity of system ; no equality of educational 
privilege among the children of the State. To remedy this evil ; 
to give us this information and equality; to secure a united and 
vigorous, instead of a divided and thus weakened common school 
system and interest ; to place upon the Legislature a compulsion to, 
by its own action, give us these advantages, instead of hazarding 
them with the voluntary action of municipal corporations — the new 
constitution provides that it should be the duty of the General As- 
sembly to provide by law for a {one) ''general and uniform system 
of common schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge and 
equally open to all." The system must operate equally in city and 
country, or it will not be uniform. The citizens of the city must 
be taxed to support it equally with those of the country. Their 
children must have the right to attend the schools under the system 
in the city. And if another set of public schools can be maintained 
in the corporation by taxation, either concurrently with or in the 
vacations of the public schools, then is taxation for the support of 
the public schools not uniform and equal; for such taxes are levied 
in effect by the State, as the city can only levy them by authority 
delegated to her by the State, and educational privilege is not made 
equal to the children of the State. In short, we will not have, as 
required by the constitution, one uniform system of common or 
public schools, (tor the terms in the statutes and constitution are 
Bynonymous,) supported by equal taxation and made equally open 
k) all. 

We think the injunction was rightly granted. It may be observed 
that the constitutional restraint applies only to moneys raised for 
tuition. Muiiicjj)al corporations may be authorized to raise money 
by taxation to build school houses, &c., but perhaps the assessment 
ahould properly be for the specific object. Money cannot be thus 
raised to pay the salaries of teachers. 

Another point was made, but it is immaterial in this case. It 
was whether the city of Lafayette had properly accepted the charter 



343 

of 1857. A charter, where acceptance may be necessary, may be 
inferred to have been accepted. If the citizens have acted under 
the new charter, it might be reij;irded as an acceptance rehiting back 
to the commencement of an action under it See Red. on Railways. 
lO. Tlie judgment below is affirmed with costs 

Note. — "For the purpose of understanding the full purport and 
meaning of the section in our present constitution in regard to 
common schools, it may not be improper to take a cursory view of 
the school system in this State. The constitution of 1816 asserted 
that knowledge and learning, generally diffused throughout the 
community, were essential to a free government; and provided that 
it should be the duty of the General Assembly to provide by law 
for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation 
irom township schools to a State university, wherein tuition should 
be free, and equally open to all. See sections I and 2 art. 9, const. 
1816. As early as 1818, the General Assembly passed laws in 
regard to public schools, and the revised statutes of IS'i-l, 1831, and 
1838 contain ^' acts incorporating congressional townships, and pro- 
viding for public schools therein." In the R. S. J 843 the school 
laws were revised and amended in a lengthy chaf^ter, under the title 
of "Common Schools," and in 1849 an "act to increase and extend 
the benefit of common schools" was enacted, which considerably 
enlarged the former system, but no county was to be bound by its 
provisions until it was assented to by a majority of its popular vote. 
Several counties in the State never assented to this act. Besides 
these many local laws were enacted, for the management of schools 
in different counties and townsliips throughout the State, dissimilar 
in many respects to each other and to the general law. 

" These laws gave the officers, having control of the system the 
management of the school funds, the right to rent and sell school 
lands, and in some instances to levy taxes for the support of schools. 
Under their operation large sums of money were wasted, and some 
of the most valuable lands in the State sacrificed, without producing 
any perceptible results. Every step in legislation seemed to involve 
the system in greater expense and difficulty, until inefficiency, con- 
i'usion, and waste seemed to be the legitimate offspring of our legis- 
lation on that subject. Such was the well known condition of the 
common school system, when the constitutional convention of 1851 
adopted the following sections: 

" Knowledge and learning, generally diffused throughout a com- 
munity, being essential to the preservation of a free government, it 
shall be the duty of the General Assembly to encourage, by all 
suitable means, moral, intellectual, scientific, and agricultural im- 
provement, and to provide by law for a general and uniform system 
of common schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge and 
equally open to all." Sec. 1, art. 8. 

'■'The General Assembly shall not pass local or speci;d la^s, in 
any of the following enumerated cases, that is to say : 



344 

'• Regulatiuo; the jurisdiction and duties of justices of the peace, 
and of constables," &c.. 

•* Providing for supporting of common schools, and for the pres- 
(>rvation of school funds," &c. Sec. 2'2, art. 4. 

The object of both these sections was to provide, not only that a 
•' general system of education " should be established, as was 
required by the constitution of 1816, but that such system should 
be both general and uniformi and for the purpose of more effectu- 
ally securing that result, the 'i'id section places it beyond the power 
of the General Assembly to pass local or special laws, "providing 
for su]:)porting common schools." 

Language of Supreme Court in Greencaatle v. Black, 5 Ind. H. 
p. 560^and 561. 

These decisions settle beyond all (piestion the meaning of the 
constitution on the points involved. No rehearing before the same 
court, or ruling of any new court, will ever reverse these decisions, 
for they are unquestionalily fortified by principles and authorities 
which cannot be successfully controverted. It only remains for us 
to ascertain, in view of these decisions, the extent of our jiower un- 
der the constitution over the subject of education. 

There is a respectable portion of the people of this State, who be 
lieve that education should be provided for and controlled wholly 
by the several religious denominations, each church establishing 
and maintaining a sufficient number of parocliial schools, to educate 
all the children under their charge. 

Another portion of our people believe that each man should pro- 
vide for the education of his own children, as he would provide for 
their ibod or clothing. 

Another portion believe that the State should in some way pro- 
vide for the e<Jucation of the children of the people at the public 
expense. 

The framers of our constitution ado|)ted tiie opinion that the State 
should educate the children of the people, and, as it would seem, 
carried this opinion to the utmost extreme. Common schools wnder 
our constitution must be organized as a State institution, and sup- 
ported as to tuition, wholly by State funds. No district, no town- 
ship, no town, no city, no county can levy and collect taxes from 
the people for the support of sclioois. Townships, towns, and cities 
may levy taxes for the construction and repair of scliool houses, 
anfl for the {jrovidirig of furniture and fuel therefor, but the State 
alone can levy taxes fur the j)ayment of teachers. Whether wise 
or unwise, expedient or unex{)edient, such is the constitution, and 
sucii must be the law. 

Under the constitution, and under the law as it now stands, there 
>« in corporation officers of the townships, towns, and cities, all 
necessary power to ercict, furnish, and keep in repair as many school 
honses as are necessary for the edn(;ation of all the children. Uinier 
the present law a very large number of school houses have been 



345 

erected, and at the present rate of increase in each county the peo- 
ple of the whole State would soon be amply supplied. In many 
places, even in tiie rural districts, appear newl}' erected houses, so 
neat, spacious and convenient, as to mark a high degree of taste 
among the people. So well provided as we are wnth houses, it 
would seem unfortunate that we should fail to keep them occupied. 
Our means to keep up the schools must be derived from State funds. 
Schools kept up by subscription, or by tuition bills, become private 
schools, and the State can take no official cognizance of them. It 
becomes us then to inquire into the amount and availability of our 
resources under the present law. 

The income from the consolidated school fund of the State, as 
distributed annually to the several counties, is sufficient, when 
added to the congressional township ffind, to keep up on the average, 
schools in each township scarcely one month each year. Probably 
this fund would support schools from two-thirds to three-fourths of 
one month. The income from the State tax of ten cents on each 
one hundred dollars worth of property, and fifty cents on each poll, 
is sufficient when distributed to the counties according to number 
of children in each, to support schools in each township about one 
and a half montlis each year. 

So that from all our available resources, under the present law, 
we can support schools only from two to three months each year. 
In counties wdiere the Congressional township fund happens to be 
large, and the circumstances are favorable to the convenient organi- 
zation of districts, they can have three month's schools. In other 
counties, less favored by local circumstances, they can support their 
schools only two months. To furnish an additional month of 
schooling in each district would require an additional State tax of 
abo;.t seven cents on each one hundred dollars worth of property. 

To insure therefore on the average in each district in the State 
a three months school would require d State tax of seventeen cents 
on each one hundred dollars. For a four months school there would 
be required a tax of twenty-four cents — for five months thirty-one 
cents — for six months thirty eight cents — for eight months fifty- 
two cents, and for a schovd often months we should have to levy a 
tax of at least sixt3'-six cents on each one hundred dollars. 

All this and much more can be done, if the legislatuiie and the 
people agree thereto. The power of the legislature is unlimited by 
the constitution as to the amount of tax it may levy on the people of 
the State for school purjioses. The rate may be fixed at ten or even 
twenty dollars on each one hundred dollars of property. But will 
public sentiment sustain as high a rate of State taxation as would 
be necessary, under presest circumstances, to support our public 
schools for six, eight or ten mouths in the year? Would it be rea- 
sonable to expect it? Would it be right to ask it? While the 
State tax for all general purposes, for interest on the State debt, for 
support of the various departments of government, and for all mis- 
cellaneous pur[>oses, is only fifteen cents on each one hundred dol- 



346 

lars of property, would the people ever consent to pay a tax of 
thirty, or forty, or fift3% or sixty cents on each one hundred dollars 
of their property for the support of schools ? 

If the legislature will pass and the people will sustain a law levy- 
ing a tax of sufficient amount to support the schools from eight to 
ten months each year, we can educate the people under ihe present 
system. If not, we had better change the constitution as speedily 
as possible, and go buck to the system of 1849, or some other sys- 
tem, that will leave the people to manage their school afl'airs in their 
own way. 

The school lawot lS5i attempted, in conformity to the constitu 
tion, a centralization of power. The State Superintendent was the 
head of the system in the State ; the county auditor in the county, 
and the trustees in the township. The law of 1855, both in its 
theory and its practical operation, greatly departs from these prin- 
ciples. The old district system is in part restored ; there is a new 
officer, called a director, created fur each district; the people have 
a negative right of choosing their teacher, and a positive right of 
requiring his dismissal at any time, should he displease the major- 
ity. The qualifications for voting at district meetings are not well 
defined, and tlie duties of the director and the trustees frequently 
conflict. 

The county atiditor, under the law of 1855, has no right to de- 
cide appeals. This is a defect in the law. There is a class of cases 
affording innumerable questions for appeals, cases arising from the 
locating of school houses by the township trustees, which should 
be decided either by the county auditor, or by the board of county 
commissioners. It is absurd to refer to the Superintendent the set- 
tling of disputes arising from the locating of school houses in the 
ten thousand neighborhoods of the State. 

The law does not confer upon the Superintendent any control 
wliatever over the school funds, either those derived from trust 
funds, or from taxation. The school tunds are paid into the State 
Treasury, mixed with other funds, and ti'^ed indiscriminately with 
other funds in paying the interest on the State debt, or for current 
Slate expenses. In this way the State Treasury became indebted 
10 the school fund in 1856 to the amount of ^93,000. In 1857 this 
debt was increased $35,000. So there is at the end of the year 
18'i7 due from the treasury to the school fund nearly $128,000. 
This money should have been distributed according to law for the 
support of schools. If it were on hand now it would add one third 
to the amciunt to l)e distributed this year, and thereby add one third 
to the length of the school in all the townships of the State. But 
over this matter the Sui)erintendent has no more control than he 
has over the revenues of Russia. 

There was also, as lung ago as the 3 1st of October, 1853, due 
from the treasury to the schuul fund nearly •S800,00(), derived from 
the sinking fund. It bi-ars interest at the ra't; of six per cent. 



347 

But no provision has ever been made by law, nor has any means 
ever been placed at the disposal of the treasurer for the annual pay- 
ment of this interest, that it might be distributed for the support of 
echools. 

On the whole there would seem necessary either a radical and 
thorough revision of the school law, making it conform to the con- 
stitution and circumstances, or such a change in the constitution 
as Bhall enable us either to render this system more effective, or to 
substitute therefor a new system on different principles. 

W. 0. LARRABEE, 

Superintendent. 

Indianapolis, Februar}^ 10, 1858. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Reports from County Auditors. 
II. Number of Children in the State, by counties, according to the 
enumeration of 1857. 

III. Number of Children in the State according to the enumeration 

in 1856, amount of School Fund received at State Treasury 
for distribution, and the amount distributed to each County 
for the year 1857. 

IV. Catalogue of Books in the Township Libraries, with the prices 

appended. 



351 



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251 00 
231 00 
599 00 
327 00 
675 00 
282 00 
779 00 

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181 00 
2,280 00 




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440 00 
625 00 

1,056 35 
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675 00 
431 14 
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560 00 


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Middlebury 

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for building 
school houses, 

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sioqAi. 


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811 00 
149 00 
678 00 


1,191 00 

1,295 00 

752 00 

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33.33 

27.00 
33.33 


31.00 
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2 


No. of Teach- 
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Children be- 
tween the ages 
of 5 and 21 
years. 


1 o ot en C-. to .xi CI o r~ i» c C-. = 
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2904 
1581 
717 
716 
599 
427 
577 
501 
358 
493 
393 
41 


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TOWNSHIPS. 


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Lancaster 

Republican 

Graham 


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; 1 


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• 


Tax assessed for 

building school 

houses. 


i : 

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. . O • 

. . o . 


395 00 

1,631 00 

230 00 

"ioo 61 




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• 


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285 

218 


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655 00 
198 00 
380 00 
365 00 


887 50 
516 75 
566 00 
339 00 


j 
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Average compensation 
per montk. 


■i 

5 


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a 

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15 00 

20 00 
4o 00 
00 00 
60 00 
25 00 




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Children be- 
tween the ages 
of 5 and 21 


O 1- O O X -.O 1--5 — 0> t- 0» 

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Busseron 

Washington 

Palmyra 


■V incennes City 

Harrison 

Johnson 

Decker 

Steen 


j 1 


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379 



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171 42 

"419 06 
246 97 

143 61 

148 48 

422 03 

447 82 

96 97 


"392 '08 
63 22 

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500 00 


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i ::::::::::::: 




1 ::::::::::::: 
1 ;;::;;;:;:; I ; 




12 33 

13 25 
13 33 
23 33 
15 00 
15 70 
12 33 

'14' 10 
12 00 




20 CO 
20 40 
20 87 

20 83 
22 90 

25 00 

26 40 

21 15 

19" 50 

20 73 

21 16 

18 83 
20 00 

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. CI CI M r-^ ri CI CO • CI to • - 


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200 
195 
475 
231 
27G 
314 
377 
305 

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417 

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160 
70 

4312 




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to T CO CO — C-. = T 1.-5 ■'T CO CI (- CO CI 00 

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coeoiocCTCOTr-j-citoi^mcoi-ioii-i n 


Jacksou 

Monroe 

Washington 

Tijipecanoe 

Turkey Creek 

■\ an Huron 

Plain 

Wayne 

Corp. Warren 

Clay 

Vi-.nVHr, 


ill 


Scott 

Total 


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Tax assessed 

for building 

school houses. 

Sec, &c. 


1 => 

o 

•^nnotnc j _, 

sioiAi j '■'' 




406 00 

"287' 00 
96 00 
124 00 
141 00 


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j •jCJBjqT'i ut satnnio^ 






^ '^l t^ lO . 

lo cc r-. 10 m ■ 
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; -sjBai am 
ll uiqijjii pa}oa.ia 
' ; sasnoij looqag 


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{ £ 




= 


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npa joj papuadxa vmoinv ! "^ 

1 1 ^ 




434 00 
363 00 
2H4 00 
170 00 
216 00 
105 00 


Average compensation 
per month. 


i 


•ai'Btnaj 






i : : 
» : : 




■aiTiH 










c 
o 

a 
a 

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30 00 
11 60 


. . 


§ 
•aiBjj w 




91 00 

20 00 
34 00 
24 00 
27 00 


J: 


•qSiH 


•aiBHiaj 1 






C< ;;;;;; 1 CI 


No. of Teac 
ers. 


■aiBK 1 








a 
o 
o 


■saiBtaai[ 






1- w i-iinco • ■ 


m 


■aiBK 




m -J- ic CO CI . 


00 


U -aBajf 


•mSjh 1 : 




ei 1 c< 1 

•n* 1 Tj* 1 


P. aqi SaiJDp aouBp 
j] -nau« ui siidTid 


■aotntnoo j " 




258 

'260 
195 
236 
106 

1010 


1 •siooqoB 
ji JO apBjS puE •OK 


•qSiH i : 




"::::::!" 


uotntnoo j '~'°' 


tni^ -^invn • 10 


' •spuwa JO jaqran^ | "^^ 


oxtowmn'j" 10 

1 L-? 


Children be- 
tween the ages 
of 5 and 21 
years. 


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Michigan 

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Center 

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386 
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486 
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325 
1012 

281 

4682 


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p -npa .loj papuadxa jiinotay 

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p. 


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Ilji 

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389 



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1- in t^ 00 O n 



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t^ o r-i cs o c c; 

TI" 00 •-< O O O " 

in 1" LT CI c( - 



« e< CI 

ct c<-* 



«D C» M O O O O -T 1^ O O f^ X- 

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ooooooooooooo 

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CO'-iCO^r-lCI'-li-'CO'-l CO 

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1-1 —I CI ct ^ CI CI c* r: c* '-I 

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r-i r-< r^ CI rl CI CI CO CI C» rl i-H 

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1 D. J.— 27 



390 



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M 



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Tax assessed 

for building 

school houses, 

&c., &c. 


•^nnorau 
sioqii. 


00 «c 

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in 




in into 


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o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

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-npa; joj papuadxa ^unomy g g ^ o t-- 1^ 


218 00 
311 00 
723 00 
.339 00 
1,375 00 
150 00 


Average compensation 
per montli. 


.to 


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a 

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l^r^t0 1^O-^00<StOCi<0i-lr-l 


• eiD!a}Sta JO jaqranfl | ^<vm<:naja^ 


5 ci 00 o; cj — 1 i-i 


Children be- 
tween tlie ages 
of 5 and 21 

years. 


1 r^ !3 i- O 00 C) ir 

■BaiBraaj 1 J^S'^iTiglS^ 


3 o 1- m CO o to 

1 CI 1-^ Cl CM 1-1 


1 oocmci r^-i-ci omcjooj 
s.c1[t;i\ ■»• CI e»5 CI CI r-i c( ci c) ci c< i-i 


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TOWNSHIPS. 


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to CI C< -». CI CI rH 






1050 
33G 
29:! 
624 
310 
333 
2C0 






ss 

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to CI 


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690 00 
967 00 
541 00 
190 00 
325 00 
190 00 
240 00 
355 00 












210 00 
64 00 




360 00 
80 00 
65 00 
04 00 
75 00 
65 00 
60 00 
71 00 












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j ^ 00 I- 00 o to to o 




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554 00 
417 00 
414 00 
280 00 
583 08 
260 00 
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300 00 










































65 00 
40 00 


















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for l)uildlng 

scliooi houses, 

&c., &c. 


•jnnotm; 


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1 • ■ 


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o s o o o o o o o .c 
o o o o o o c: o c .c 

ecincctti 1-^^1-11-11^ .c 

e© : 




18 


ge compensation 
ler month. 


to 


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a 
o 

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1 


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: :- IS i 


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■BaiTSraa J oeooo-. mooooocirHO ; ; 


a 
iti 


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550 00 
418 00 
515 00 
176 00 
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I uUdJDg school 

houses, Sec. 


•junooK; 
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496 50 

866 41 
501 30 




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675 00 

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284 00 






tioii 




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per month. 


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3 

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1 


Childien be- 
tween the apes 
of 5 and 21 
years. 


X C O i^ -^ i.O C: CO . X c^ c*: O i-- -^ o 1 
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saicraaj ci A i-i ci ci ci co ;co"cicirHci 1 
1 "" CO 1^ o •?< 1- o — r» ~.'o c! Tt> Mi- c> ■* 1 
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Cloverdale town 


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Taxes assessed 

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school houses 

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32:J.45 
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22.67 
28.33 
28.33 
18.45 
26.67 
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266 
323 
180 
1270 




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981 
294 
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410 
376 
224 
493 
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3288 

6760 


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Union 


Town of Evansville 

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r-i(Mco^>n<st~aooo 



413 



STATEMENT NO. 2. 



Number of Children in the State by Counties, aceordinp to the 
enume.redion made in 1857, together with the amount of Commori 
School Fund distributed to each county f-r the year 1858. 



COUNTIES. 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew- 
Benton 

Blackford . ... 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Davi( 



?ies3 . 



Dearhorn . . . 
Decatur . . . . 

Dekalb 

Delaware . . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart .... 
Fayette .... 

Floyd 

Fountain. . . 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton . . 
Hancock. . . . 
Harrison. . .. 
Hendricks. . 

Henry 

Howard. ... 
Huntington . 
Jacks 



ison . 



Jasper . .. . 
Jay 

Jefferson . . 
Jennings. . 
Johnson . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko. 
Lagrange.. 

Lake 

Laporte . .. 
Lawrence . 
Madison.. . 
Marion . . . . 
Marshall . . 
Martin 



Miami 

Morgan 

Monroe 

Montgomery . 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 



Number 


Distributive 


of 


share of 


Children. 


each county. 


3,409 


$2,449 00 


9,794 


6,856 00 


e,468 


4,528 00 


834 


584 00 


],fiOO 


1,120 00 


5,914 


4,140 00 


2,541 


1.779 00 


4,731 


3,312 00 


5,409 


3,787 00 


6,696 


4,687 00 


4,()3U* 


2,821 00 


5,063 


3,9G5 00 


3,120 


2,184 00 


4.448 


3,114 00 


8,490 


5.943 00 


6,548 


4,584 00 


5,135 


3,595 00 


5,705 


3,994 00 


3,676 


1 2,597 00 


7,192 


5,034 00 


3,567 


2,497 00 


6,670 


4,669 00 


5,305 


3,714 00 


7,044 


4,931 00 


3,469 


2,428 00 


4,732 


3,312 00 


5,837 


4,086 00 


5,898 


4,129 00 


6,242 


4,369 00 


4,971 


3,480 00 


6,867 


4.807 00 


5,918 


4,143 00 


7,451 


5,216 00 


3,845 


2,692 00 


4,945 


3,462 00 


5,498 


3.850 00 


2,356 


1,649 00 


4,448 


3,114 00 


9,307 


6,515 00 


5,295 


3,707 00 


4,962 


3,473 00 


4,900 


3,430 00 


6,321 


4,425 00 


3,961 


X 2,830 00 


2,7)9 


1,903 00 


0,<)25 


11 5,529 00 


4,682 


3,277 00 


3,263 


2.284 00 


11,233 


7,863 00 


4,260 


2,982 00 


2,973 


2,081 00 


5,807 


4,065 00 


5,647 


3,953 00 


4,815 


3,371 00 


7,130 


4,991 00 


5,131 


3,572 08 


2,106 


1,475 00 


4.420 


3,094 00 


5,241 


3,669 00 


5,770 


4,039 00 


3,859 


2,702 00 


3,426 


2,::98 00 


3,186 


2,131 00 


5.717 


4,002 00 


2,017 


1,412 00 



414 



STATEMENT XO. 2.— Coiitiiuied. 



66 

67 
6d 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
60 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 



Futnam .... 
Randolph . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Joseph . 
Steulien . . . . 
Sullivan . . . 
Switzerland 
Tippecanoe. 
Tipton 



COUNTIES. 



Union . 
Vanderburgh . 
Vermillion . . . 

Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total 



Number 


Distributive 


of 


share of 


Children. 


each county . 


7.085 


$4,960 00 


6,6U8* 


4,626 00 


6,970 


4,879 00 


5,299 


3,709 00 


2,649 


1,854 00 


6,962 


4,873 00 


4.922 


3,445 00 


703 


492 00 


5,915 


4,141 00 


3 540 


2,478 00 


4,879 


3,415 00 


4,896 


3,447 00 


7,457 


5,220 OO 


2,6U6 


1,824 00 


2,569 


1,798 00 


6,760 


4,732 00 


1,798 


1,259 00 


6,5G3 


4,595 00 


6,160 


4,212 00 


3,454 


2,418 CO 


4,563 


3,194 00 


6,563 


4,594 00 


9,854 


6,898 00 


3,976 


2.783 00 


2 772 


1,940 00 


3,675 


2,573 00 



460,827 I $323,155 00 



* Number taken from last year's report. No report this j'ear. 
t Including S24 for error in distribution last year. 

I Including $58 for error in distribution last year. 

II Including $681 for error in distribution last year. 



415 






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419 



STATEMENT XO. 4. 



Catalogue of Books in the Township Libraries, irith. tltc pricec^ 

a'ppended. 



TITLES. 



Cost. 



Prescott's Conquest of Mexico, 3 v. 8vo. . . 

Percy Anecdotes, 1 v. 8vo 

Dickens' Christmas Book, 1 v. 12mo 

Wilkinson's Ancient Egyptians, 2 v. 12mo, 

Layards' Nineveh, 1 y. 12mo 

Gardner's Farmers' Dictionary, 1 v. 12mo- 

Irying's Columbus, 1 v. 12mo 

Phillips' Curran and Cotemporaries, I v. 

12mo 

Lamartine's History of the Girondists, 3 v, 

]2mo 

Smith's History of Greece, 1 v. ]2mo 

Howe's Eminent Mechanics, 1 v. 12 mo... 

Plutarch's Lives, 4 v. 12mo 

Czar and his People, 1 v. 12mo i 

Book for the Home Cfrcle, 1 v. 12 mo 

Barry's Fruit Garden, 1 v. 12 mo 

Kirkland's Holydays Abroad, 2 v. 12mo. . . 

Willis' Rural Letters, 1 v. 12mo 

Willis' Summer Cruise, I v. 12mo 

Denison's Home Pictures, 1 v. 12mo 

Thomas' Farm Implements, 1 v. 12mo.... 
Edgeworth's Harry and Lucy, 1 v. 12mo.. 

Edgen'orth's Rosamond, 1 v. 12mo ,. 

Stephens' Travels in Egypt, &c., 2 v. 12mo. 
Stephens' Travels in Turkey, &c., 2 v. 

12mo 

Pursuit of Knowledge, 2 v. 12mo. 

Edgeworth's Parents' Assistant, 1 v. ]2mo. 
Somerville's Physical Sciences, 1 v. 12mo. 

Boyhood of Great Men, 1 v. 12mo 

Tonna's Siege of Derry, 1 v. ]8mo 

Tonna's Judea Captive, 1 v. 18 mo 

Tonna's Judah's Lion, 1 v. 18mo 

Tonna's Helen Fleetwood, 1 v. 18mo 

Tonna's Floral Biography 1 v. 18mo 

Tytler's Universal History, 6 v. 18mo 

Perils of Greatness, 1 v. ]8mo 

History of Switzerland, 1 v. 12mo 

Life of Paul Jones, 2 v. 12mo 

Tuthill's Tip Top, 1 v. 12mo 

Sparks' American Biography, 10 v. 12mo. . 
Francis' Orators of the Age, 1 v. 12mo. ... 

Life of Mozart, 1 v. 12mo 

Dickens' Child's History of England, 2 v. 

12mo 

Swiss Family P^obinson, 4 v. 16mo 

Buel's Farmers' Instructor. 2 v. IGmo 

History of Chivalry and the Crusades, 1 v. 

16mo 

Higgin's Physical Condition of the Earth,, 

1 V. 16rao 

Mudie's Guide to Observations of Nature, 

1 V. 16mo 

Aikens' Evenings at Home, 1 v. ICmo 

Arthur's Rising in the World, 1 v. 16mo.. . 
Arthur's Keeping up Appearances, 1 v. 

16mo 

Arthur's Riches have Wings, 1 v. IGmo. ... 
Arthur's Retiring from Business, 1 v. ICmo. 
Arthur's Delitor and Creditor, 1 v. IGmo... 
Arthur's Making Haste to be Rich, 1 vol. 

16mo I 

Love Token for Children, 1 v. ISmo 

Isabel, I v. ]8mo 

Mcintosh's AVoman an Enigma, 1 v. 18mo.j 
Mcintosh's Conquest and Self-Conquest, l| 

V. 18mo I 

What's to be Done. 1 v. 18nio 1 



$5 UG 


1 12 


71 


] 80 


71 


1 31 


71 


SO 


2 03 


91 


71 


2 62 


70 


88 


87 


1 89 


1 13 


1 13 


90 


90 


1 05 


82 


1 61 


1 Gl 


1 42 


82 


Ai 




4.5 


45 


45 


45 


45 


2 65 


47 


57 


88 


54 


7 12 


4a 


46 


96 


1 45 


90 



TITLES. 



Wealth and Worth, 1 v. 18mo 

Auto-Biography of Franklin, 2 v. 18mo . . 

Mcintosh's The Cousins, 1 v. 18mo 

Means and Ends, 1 v. 18mo 

Mcintosh's Praise and Principle, 1 vol. 
18mo 

Live and Let Live, 1 v. 18mo 

Hoflanu's Son of a Genius, 1 v. 18mo 

llofland's Young Crusoe, 1 v. 18mo 

Dana's Young Sailor, 1 v. 18mo 

Dunham's History of Spain and Portugal, 
5 V. 18mo 

Gibbon's Decline and Fall, 6 v. ]2mo 

Shakespeare, 6 v. 12mo 

McKenzie's Works, 1 v. 12mo 

Elliott's Women of tne Revolution, 3 v.. . 

Ellett's Pioneer Women of the West, 1 v. 
12mo 

Ellett's Domestic History of the Revolu- 
tion, 1 V. 12mo 

Morrill's American Shepherd, 1 v. 12mo. . 

Schmit's History of Rome, 1 v. 12mo 

Gary's Lyre, and Other Poems, 1 v. 12 mo. 

Halleck's Poems, 1 v. 12mo 

Youatt on Cattle, 1 v. 12mo 

Praed's Lillian, and Other Poems, 1 vol. 
12mo 1 

Clovernook, 2 v. 12mo 

Brace's Hungary, 1 v. 12mo 

Brace's Home Life in Germany, 1 v. 12mo. 

Herbert's Captains of the Old World, 1 v. 
12mo 

Herbert's Captains of the Roman Repub- 
lic, 1 V. 12mo 

Reveries of a Bachelor, 1 v. 12mo 

Simms' Huguenotts of Florida, 1 v. 12mo. 

Kirkland's Evening Book, 1 v. 12mo 

Arthur's Sparing to Spend, 1 v. ]2mo 

Hume's History of England, G v 12mo.. . 

Ik. Marvel's Dream Life, 1 v. ]2mo 

Life of Sir Walter Scott, 1 v. ]2mo 

Warings' Elements of Agriculture, 1 v.i 
12mo 1 

Mitchell's Planetary and Stella World, 1 v.l 
12mo 

Taylor's Indications of the Creator, 1 
I 12mo • 

School and Schoolmaster, 1 v. 12mo. . .. 
I Van Santvoord's Life of Algernon Sidney, 

I 1 V. 12mo 

I Ward's India and the Hindoos, 1 v. 12mo. 
! Griscom's Uses and Abuses of Air, 1 v. 

i 12mo 

I Lamartine's Celebrated Characters, I v. 

I 12mo 

I Larrabee's Rosabower, 1 v. 12mo 

I Larrabee's Science and Religion, 1 vol. 

I 12mo ! 

i Rollin's History, 2 v. 8vo 

j Arthur's Old Man's Bride, 1 v. ICmo 

Edgeworth's Frank, 2 v. IGmo 

Robertson's Charles v., 1 v. IGmo 

! Peter the Great, 1 v. 16mo 

McKenzie's Life of Com. Perry, 2 v lOmo 

Segur's E.>;peditioD to Russia, 2 v. IGmo. . 
Fletcher's History of Poland, 1 v. IGmo..! 

American Husbandry, 2 v. ICmo. { 

Park's Travels, 1 v. IGmo i 

Warren's Diary of a Physician, 3 v. IGmo.i 



Cost. 



SO 44 
88 
39 
44 

39 
44 
34 
37 
39 

2 51 

2 70 
4 27 

90 

3 27 

1 13 

1 05 
75 
95 
73 
91 

I 05 

91 

I 82 

88 

88 

1 12 

1 12 
1 10 
1 13 

1 13 
68 

2 70 
1 10 
1 05 

62 

1 13 

1 05 
86 

1 05 
1 13 



1 G2 

G7 



9S 
44 
44 

88 
44 
90 
44 
3>' 



420 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



Frazer's Assyria and Mesopotamia, 1 vol. 
ICmo 

Buck's Ruins of Ancient Cities, 2 v. 16mo 

Russell's Palestine, 1 v. 16mo 

Russell's Barbary States, 1 v. IGmo 

Cate's Year with the Franklins, 1 v. 16mo. 

llutton's Book of Nature, 1 v. 16mo 

BaiTow's Pitcairn's Island, 1 v. lOmo 

Arthur's Heart Histories; 1 v. 16mo 

Eilgar's Foot Prints of Famous Men, 1 v. . 
Tonna's Personal Recollections, 1 v. IGmo 
Crowe's Hist-iry of France, 3 v. ICmo. ... 
Sigourney's Examples of Life and Death, 

1 V. 16mo 

Arthur's Home Lights and Shadow, 1 v. 

16mo 

Tuthills's Braggadocio, 1 v. 16mo 

Moors in Spain, 1 v. IGrao 

Dana's Two Xears Before the Mast, 1 vol. 

IGmo 

Abbott's History of Darius, 1 v. ICmo 

Abbott's History of Hannibal, 1 v. IGino. . 
Abbott's History of Alfred the Great, 1 v. 

Ifimo 

Abbott's History of Antoinette, 1 v. IGmo. 

Turner's Sacred History, 2 v. IGmo 

Halleck's British Poets, 2 v. 18mo 

Indian Biography, 2 v. 18mo 

Euler's Letters on Natural PhiliTsophy, 2 

V. ISmo 

Fraser's History of Persia, 1 v. 18mo 

James' Life of Charlemagne, 1 v. ISmo.. . 

Stone's Boi-der Wars, 2 v. 18mo 

Marco Paulo's A'oyages and Travels, 5 v. 

IGmo 

Abbott's 'Mother at Home, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Child at Home, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Madame Roland, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Romulus, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's William the Conqueror, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Xer.xes, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Alexander, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Caesar, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Charles I., 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Charles II., 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott 3 Cleopatra, 1 v. ICmo 

Abbott's Cyrus. 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Queen Elizabeth, 2 v. IGmo 

Aijljott's Josephine, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Mary Queen of Scots, 1 v. IGmo. . 

Abbott's Nero, 1 v. ICmo 

Abbott's Beechnut, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Malleville, 1 v. ICmo 

Abbott's Rodolphus, 1 v. ICmo 

Abbott's Caroline. 1 v. ICmo 

Abbott's ,\gne3, I V. ICmo 

Abbott's Wallace, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Mary Erskine, 1 v. IGmo 

Abbott's Mary Ball, 1 v. IGmo 

Tuthill's Queer Bonnets, 1 v. ICmo 

Mayhew's Good fienius, 1 v. IGrao 

Mayhew'g MaL'ic of Kindness, 1 v. IGmo. . 

Taylor's British Plutarch, 1 v. ICmo 

Grandmother's Recollections, 1 v. IGmo... 

IJrewBter'a Life of Newton, 1 v. ICmo 

Cunningham'* Painters ar,d Sculptors, 5 v. 

ICmo 

Taylor's Pleasures of Taste, 1 v. ICmo 

Bourne'i Little Silverstrinjr, 1 v. ICmo . . . 

Colum' us and Vespucius, 1 v. IC mo 

Lives of EarlyNavigators, 1 v. ICmo 

Embury's Pictures of Early Life, 1 vol. 

ICmo 

Uncle 1- rank's Home St/>ries, 3 v. 24mo.. . 
Macaulay's England, 2 v. 12rao 



Cost. 



44 
44 
39 

38 
44 

G8 

4.5 
1 G8 



54 

44 

44 

58 
58 

58 
58 

1 33 

88 
■38 

88 
44 
44 

88 

2 50 
57 
57 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

53 

58 

58 

58 

58 

50 

50 

50 I 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

54 

39 

44 

40 

37 

44 

2 10 
39 
54 
39 
44 

30 
2 12 
1 20 



TITLES. 



Fairy Tales and Legends, 1 v. IGmo 

Little Drummer, 1 v. IGmo 

Morris' Poems, 1 v . 12mo 

Wood's Natural History, 1 v. 12mo 

Cormenin's Orators of France, I v. 12mo. 
Orators of the American Revolution, 1 v. 

12mo 

A Hero and Other Tales, I v. 12mo 

George's Life of Queen Isabella, 1 v. 12mo 

Journey Round the World, 1 v. 12mo 

.Abbott's Summer in Scotland, 1 v. 12mo. . 

Simms' Chevalier Baj'ard, 1 v. 12mo 

Sigourney's Letters to Mothers. 1 v. 12mo. 

Co-x's Buckeye Abroad, 1 v. ]2mo 

Dana's Poems and Idle Man, 1 v. 12mo.. . 
Van Doren's Mercantile Morals, 1 v. 12rao 
Everett's Lectures on Education, 1 vol. 

12mo 

Robinson Crusoe, 1 v. 12mo 

Wheeler's Rural Homes, 1 v. 12mo 

Aiken's Evenings at Home, 1 v. 12mo 

Farmer's Companion, 1 v. 12mo 

Flagg's Venice, 2 v. ]-2mo 

Furguson's Roman Republic, 1 v. ICmo . . 
Paulding's Life of Washington, 2 v. IGmo. 

Scenes in Nature, 1 v. IGmo 

Tilings by their Right Names, 1 v. ICmo. . 
Lives of Celebrated Travelers, 3 v. IGmo. 

Bryant's American Poets, 1 v. IGmo 

Rambles about the Country, 1 v. IGmo 

Fenelon's Ancient Philosophers, 1 v. ICmo 
Crichton's History of Arabia, 2 v. IG mo. . 
Lives of Cortez, Balboa, &c., 1 v. ICmo. . 
Johnson's Economy of Health, 1 v. IGmo. 
Circumnavigation of the Globe, 1 v. IGmo. 

Ren wick's Life of De Witt, 1 v. IGmo 

Iceland and Greenland, 1 v. IGmo 

Lossing's History of the Fine Arts, 1 vol. 

ICmo 

Renwick's Lives of Jay and Hamilton, 1 

V. ICmo 

Russell's Egypt, 1 v. IGmo 

Armstrong's Agriculture, 1 v. IGmo 

Russell's Nubia and Aliyssinia, 1 v. IGmo. 
Spalding's Italy and Italian Islands, 3 v. 

IGmo 

Lander's Travels in Africa, 2 v ICmo .... 
Robertson's History of America, 1 v. IGmo 
Scandinavia, Ancient and Modern, 2 v. 

ICmo 

Brewster's Martyr's of Science, I v. IGmo 

Mosely's Mechanics, 1 v. ICmo 

Russell's Lfe of Cromwell, 2 v. ICmo 

Edgeworth's Moral Tales, 2 v. IGmo 

Bush's Life of Mohamet, 1 v. IGmo 

Flowers of Fal)le, 1 v. ]2mo 

Page's Theory and Practice of Teaching 

i2mo 

Sargent's Temperance Tales, 12mo 

Elliott's Western Fruit Book, 12mo 

Col ton's California, l2mo 

Cowdery's Moral Lessons, 12mo 

Todd's Young Man, ]2mo 

The Successful Merchant, 12mo 

Moll'att's South Africa, 12mo 

Volumes 3 and 4 Macaulay's History of 

England, 2 v. 12mo 

Hildreth's Japan, 12mo 

Ancient History, 4 v. 12mo 

Chambers' Papers for the People, 12 vols 

in C, 12mo 

Teacher and Parent, 12mo 

Dick's Solar System, ]2mo 

Three Great Temptations, 12mo 

Headley's War of 1812, 2 v. 12mo 



421 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



Cooper's Naval History, 8vo 

Story on the Constitution, 12mo 

Man-of-War Life, 16mo 

Taylor's Lands of the Saracen, 12mo 

Science of Government, 12mo 

Sight and Hearing, 12mo 

Knowledge is Power, 12mo 

Pilgrim's Progress, 12mo 

Locke Amsden, 12mo 

Chemistry of Common Life, 2 v. 12mo .. . 

Taylor's Central Africa, 12mo 

Cousin Alice's Stories, (i vols, in 3, 16mo. 

The Bible in the Counting House, ]2mo.. . 

The Mysterious Parchment, 12mo 

Holmes' Poems, IGmo 

Silliman's Tour in Europe, 2 vols. 12mo. . 

Dick's Siderial Heavens, 12mo 

The Bible in Common Schools, 12mo 

Abercrombie's Jloral Feelings, ]8mo 

Cabinet Histories of the States, 12 v. 16mo 

Weiss' Protestant Refugees, 2 v. 12mo. .. . 

Life Sketches from Common Paths, l2mo . 

Jackson and New Orleans, 12mo 

Ten Years among the Mails Bags, 12mo. . . 

My Schools and Schoolmasters, 12mo 

Grape and Strawberry Culture, 12mo 

Success in Life, 4 vols, in 2. 12mo 

Bonner's Child's History of the U. States, 
2 vols. 16mo 

American Institutions, 12mo 

Sparks' Americ;tn Biography, 2(1 Series, 15 
vols., i2mo 

Whittier's Poems, 8vo 

Noble Deeds of American Women, 12mo. . 

Hillard's Italy, 12mo 

Fremont's Exploring Expedition, 12mo... 

Mothers of the Wise and Good, 16mo 

Boyd's Milton, 12mo 

Cutter's Lafayette, 12mo 

Abercrombie's Intellectual Powers, 18mo. . 

Chief Justices of the United States, 8vo . . 

Ti-ench on Study of Words and Trench on 
English Past and Present, 2 vols in 1, 

12mo 

The Peasant Boy Philosopher, ICmo 

The Wonders of Science, 12mo 

Mcllvaine's Evidences of Christianity, 12 

mo 

Chambers' Repository, 12 vols, in 6, 12mo. 

Bayne's Christian Life, ]2mo 

The Ocean, 12mo 

The Book and its Story, 12mo 

Hue's China, 2 vols. 12mo 

The Bible in the Family, 12mo 

Boyd's Pollock, 12mo 

The Merchant Vessel , IGmo 

The Teacher's Miscellany, 12mo 

The Mirror of Nature, ]2mo 

The House I Live In, ISmo 

The Catacombs of Rome, 12mo 

The Island World of the Pacific, 12mo. . . . 

Edwards' Sabbath Manual, 16mo 

Davidson's C onnections, 1 2mo 

Greece and the Golden Horn, 12mo 

Permanent Temperance Documents, 3 vols 

8vo 

Binney's Study for Young Men, IGmo. ... 

The Ladies of the Covenant, 12mo 

The Iroquois, 12mo 

Abbott's RoUo Books, 14 vols, in 7, IGmo. 

Olin's Educational Lectures, 12mo 

Alison's Europe, abridged, 8to 

Life of Gen. Greene, 12mo 

Life of Gen. Marion, 12mo 

Life of Capt. Smith, 12mo 

1 D. J.— 29 



Cost. 



$1 50 
75 
75 

1 25 
75 

1 25 

1 25 
75 
60 

2 00 
1 50 
4 50 

75 
75 

1 00 

3 00 
45 
75 
40 

7 50 

2 50 
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1 25 
50 

2 00 



1 00 


1 35 


15 00 


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1 25 

75 

1 25 

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63 

75 

1 00 

40 

1 00 

1 00 

3 00 
50 
1 25 
1 00 
7 00 
1 00 
1 50 
1 25 
1 25 
I 25 



TITLES. 



Life in the Missions, 2 vols. 12mo 

Colton's Deck and Port, 12mo 

Saxton's Rural Hand Books, 3 vols. 12mo. 

The American Gardener's Calender, 8vo. . 

The Protestant Church of Hungary, 12mo 

Life of Amos Lawrence, 12mo 

Life of Dr. Abernethy, 12mo 

Layard's Babylon and Nineveh, 12mo.... 

Miller's First Impressions of England, 12 
mo 

Hildreth's United States, 6 vols. , 8vo 

Memorable Women, IGmo 

Sunshine on Daily Paths, 12mo 

The American Debater, 12mo 

Lynch's Dead Sea Expedition, 12mo 

Taylor's El Dorado, 12mo 

Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1850, 12mo 

Man and his Motives, 12mo 

Chambers' Miscellany, 20 vols, in 10, 12mo 

Hallam's Constitutional History of Eng- 
land, 3 vols. 8 yo 

Hallam's Literature of Europe, 4 vols. 
8vo !.. 

Hallam's Middle Ages, 2 vols. 8 vo 

Irving's Works, 15 vols. 12mo 

White's Essays in Literature and Ethics, 
12mo 

Footprints of Famous Men, 16mo 

James Montjoy, 12mo 

Life of Dr. Chalmers, 12mo 

Boyd's Young, 12mo 

Freedley's Treatise on Business, 12mo . 

Cowper's Poems, 3 vols. 16mo 

Durham Village and Zoological Temper- 
ance Convention, 2 vols in 1, IGmo 

Carpenter on Alcoholic Drinks and You 
mans on Alcohol, 2 vols, in 1, 12mo .... 

Pioneers of the West, 12mo 

Dadd's Cattle Doctor, 12mo 

Dadd's Horse Doctor, 12mo 

Abbott's Teacher, 12mo 

Life of Luther (Sears), 12mo 

American Farmer in England, 12mo 

Krummacher's Parables, 12mo 

Maxims of Washington, 12mo 

Foote's Africa, 12mo 

Saxe's Poems, 12mo 

The Year Book of Agriculture 

The Six Days of Creation, 12mo 

The Footsteps of St. Paul, 12mo 

Way land's Moral Science, 12mo 

Headley's Imperial Guard, 12mo 

Abbott's Jonas Books, 6 vols, m 3, 18mo. . 

Life of John Randolph, 8vo 

The Boy Hunters, IGmo 

Poetry of the Vegetable World, 12mo 

Life on a Farm, 12mo 

Railway Economy, 12mo 

The AVhale and his Captors, 18mo 

Abbott's Lucy Books, 6 vols, in 2, 18mo. . 

Oscar, IGmo ' 

Clinton, IGmo 

Ella, IGmo 

Novelties of the New World, 12mo 

Philosophy in Sport, 12mo 

Bancroft's United States, G vols. 8vo i 

Lives of Madison and Monroe, 12mo 

Plymouth and the Pilgrims, IGmo j 

Dendy's Philosophy of Mystery, 12mo . . . . ; 

The Forest Exiles, 12mo | 

Munn's Land Drainer, 12mo i 

Dick's Celestial Scenery, 12mo i 

Life at a Trade, 12mo [ 

Lives of the Signers of the Declaration,! 
12mo i 



Cost. 



$2 00 
1 25 
3 75 
1 75 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 40 

1 00 
12 00 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 00 
1 25 

1 25 
45 

6 00 

2 25 

3 00 
1 50 

19 00 



1 25 


60 


1 00 


1 25 


1 25 


1 00 


2 25 


62 


95 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 50 


1 00 


1 50 


75 


1 50 


1 00 


1 00 


1 25 


1 25 


2 25 


1 .50 


1 00 


1 25 


1 00 


1 00 


60 


2 25 


63 


63 


63 


GO 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


CO 


45 


1 00 


50 


45 


1 00 



1 00 



422 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



The Young Toyagers, IGmo 

The Progress of Science, 1 2mo 

Art and Industry in the Crystal Palace, 

12mo 

Dick's Practical Astronomer, 12mo 

Hai-per's Natural Histories, 5 vols. ]6mo.. 

Nott's Counsels to Young Men, 18mo 

Heroic Women of the West, J2mo 

Worth and Wealth, ]2mo 

Life at the Loom, 12mo 

Dick's Moral Improvement, 12mo 

Workins Man's Way in the World, ]2mo. 
The English Bible, and The Bible in Many 

Languages, two vols, in one, 16mo 

Shiel's'lrish Bar, 2 vols. 12mo 

Christianitv Revived in the East, 52mo. . . 
Paley's Natural Theology, 2 vols. 12mo.. . 
Hall's Lectures on School-Keeping, IGmo. 
Old Humphrey's Works, 14 vols, in 7, 18 



Curzon's Monasteries of the Levant, 12mo. 

Lee's Anecdotes of Bird's, 16mo 

Lee's Anecdotes of Animals, 16mo 

Village and Fann Cottages, 8 vo 

Cumming's Africa, 2 vols. 12 mo 

Brou<'ham'3 Sketches of Statesmen, 2 vols. 



12mn 

Letters to Young Ladies, 12mo 

Camp Fires of the Revolution, 8vo 

Ten Nights in a Bar-Room, 12mo 

Bigelow's Useful Arts, 2 v. 12mo 

Colton's Public Economy, 8vo 

Macaulay's Essays, 5 vols. 12mo 

Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 12 



mo 

Opie on Lying, 18mo 

Correspondence of Henry Clay,8vo 

Kennedy's Life of Wirt, 2 vols. 12mo 

The Young Man's Friend, 16mo 

The Young Woman's Friend, 16mo 

Dick's Improvement of Society, 12mo 

Lord's Modern History, 12mo 

Trench on Proverbs, and Trench on New 
Testament Synonyms, 2 vols, in 1, 12mo 

Harsha's Orators and Statesmen 

Maury's Geography of the Sea, 8vo 

Oilfillan's Literary Men, 1st Series, 12mo. 

Oilfillan's Martyrs and Heroes, IGmo 

Merrie England, by Grace Greenwood, 16 



A Long Look Ahead, 12mo 

Lives of British Ilistoiians, 2 vols. ]2mo. . 
ChaHibers' Select Writings, 4 vols. 12mo. . 

The Foot-Prints of the Creator, 12mo 

Uncle Sam's Farm Fence, 12mo 

American Educat'on, by Mansfield, ]2mo. 
Boget'.? Thesaurus of English Words, 12 

mo 

Lieber's Civil Liberty, 2 vols 

Lamp to the Path. .. . .... • j i y. iCmo. . . 

Seed Time and Harvest S 

Loasing's Field Book of the Revolution, 2 

ToU. 8 vo 

Colton's Life of Clay, 2 vols. 8yo 

Annual of Scientific DiHcovcry, 18.52, 12mo 

District School as it Wa.s, IGmo 

Maaterman Ready, IGmo 

Pioneer Settlers of Ohio, Hvo 

Joy and Care, 12mf> 

State Constitutions, 8vo 

Cyclopedia of the Worid'a Progress, 12mo. 

Abbott's Napoleon, 2 vols. 8 vo 

Cyclopedia of the Useful Art*, 12mo 

C/clopc'lia of Literature and the Fine 

Arta, 12mo 



JO 7.5 
1 25 

1 00 
45 

2 25 
50 

1 25 

1 25 

1 00 

45 

1 00 

50 

2 00 
1 00 
1 50 

37 

5 GO 

1 25 
75 
75 

2 00 

1 75 

2 50 
75 

1 75 
75 

1 50 

2 50 
5 00 

1 25 
40 

2 50 
2 00 

75 

75 

45 

1 50 

1 25 

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1 50 

1 eo 

00 



1 25 

2 50 

3 00 
1 (10 

80 



1 25 


1 00 


2 25 


125 


8 00 


4 00 


1 25 


50 


62 


2 50 



2 25 
2 50 
5 00 
2 50 

2 50 



Lives of Distinguished Women, 8 vo 

School Days and Youthful Companions, 

16 mo 

Wayland's life of Judson,2 vols., 12 mo.. 

Hue's Tartary, 2 vols, in 1, 12 mo 

Jeannie Morrison^ IG mo 

Latham's English Language, 12 mo 

The Preacher and the King, 12 mo 

Anthon's Law Student, 8 vo 

Woodworth's American Miscellany, 6 vols. 

12 mo 

Prescott's conquest of Peru, 2 vols., 8 vo. . 

The Desert Home, IG mo 

Cyclopedia of American Literature, 2 vols. 

8 vo 

Homes and Haunts of the British Poets, 2 

vols., 12 mo 

The Priest and the Huguenot, 2 vols., 12 

mo 

Wayland's Intellectual Philosophy, 12 mo 
The Queens of England, 12 vols, in 6, 12 

mo 

The Puritans and Pilgrim Fathers, 12 mo. 
Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella, 3 vols., 

8 vo 

Janney's Life of Penn, 8 to 

Life of Melancthon, 12 mo 

Peruvian Antiquities, 12 mo 

Kohlrausch's Germany, 8 vo 

Chamber's Pocket Miscellany, 24 vols, in 

12, IGmo 

Woodbury's Works, 3 vols., 8 vo 

The Old Red Sandstone, 12 mo 

McCosh on Divine Government, 8 vo . . 
Wheeler's Life and Travels of Heroditus, 

2 vols., 12 mo 

Life of Mary Lyon, 12 mo 

Mary Hewitt's Stories, 12 vols., in 6, 16 

mo 

Harrison's English Language. 12 mo. . .. 

The Boys at Home, 16 mo 

Thaer's Principles of Agriculture, 8 vo. . 
Life of Rev. William Jay, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Female Poets of America, 8 vo 

Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1853.... 

Guyot's Earth and Man, 12 mo 

The Phillippine Islands, 12 mo 

Goodrich's IJritish Eloquence, 8 vo 

Rural Life in England, 2 vols., 12 mo . .. 

Gems from F'able Land, 12 mo 

Visits to Remarkable Places, 2 vols., 12 

mo 

Hood's Poems, 2 vols., 16 mo 

Our Countrymen, by Lossing, 12 mo. . 
■i Lights and Shadows of Scottish Life, 12 

mo 

Upham's Philosophy, 2 vols., 12 mo j 

Adventures of a Boy in Australia, 16 mo. . i 

Butler's Analogy of Religion, 12 mo 

History of Cuba, 12 mo j 

The Mayflower, by Mrs. Stowe, 12 mo j 

Cleveland's Compendium of English Lit-j 

erature, 2 vols., 12 mo j 

Parky n's Abysinia, 2 vols., 12 mo i 

Smyth's Lectures on Modern History, 

8vo 

Annecdotes for Girls, 16 mo 

Annerdotea for Boys, 16 mo 

The Daugliterat School, 12 mo 

Civilization and 5Ioney, 2 vols, in 1, 16 

mo 

Magic, and Remarkable Delusions, 2 vols. 

in 1, IG mo 

Escapes from Peril. / „ .„ . -, i-. „„ 

T .«■ , I 1 Ti (2 vols. In 1, JO mo. 

Life's Last Hours.. ) ' 



50 

50 
SO 



423 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



Mines and Caves of Earth, 2 vols, in 1, IG 
mo 

The Reformation, 2 vols in 1, 10 mo 

Protestantism, 2 vols in 1, IG mo 

Good Health, and Medical Men, 2 vols, in 

1, IG mo 

The llugnenots and Waldenses, 2 vols, in 

1, IGmo 

Wickliffe, and The Morning of the Reform- 
ation, 2 vols, in 1, IG mo 

Encyclopedia of Geography, 3 vols. 8 vo. . 

Encyclopedia of Missions, 8 vo 

The Myrtle Wreath, 12 mo 

Somerville's Physical Geography, 12 mo. . 

Wirt's Life of Patrick Henry, 8 vo 

Reed's Lectures on English History, 12 mo 

Kritish India, 3 vols., IG mo 

Najiier's Peninsula War, 5 vols., 8 vo. . 
Sacred Philosophy of the Seasons, 4 vols., 

12 mo 

Half Hours with the Best Authors, 4 vols., 

12 mo 

Modern British Essayists, 7 vols., 8 vo. ... 

Smith's Year with the Turks, 12 mo 

Stanbury's Salt Lake Expedition, 8 vo. ... 

Visit to European Celebrities. 12 mo 

Dick Wilson, 12 mo 

Captain Canot's Adventures, 12 mo 

The Body and the Mind, 12 mo 

Dick on Covetousness, 12 mo 

The Tatler, 4 vols., IGmo 

Webster's Works, 6 vols. , 8 vo 

Southey's Life of Wesley, 2 vols, 12 mo . . 

Thi Miller and the Millwright, 12 mo 

Coleman's Ancient Christianity, 8 vo 

Burleigh's Legislative Guide, 12 mo 

Lambert Lilly's Histories, 4 vols, in 2, 16 

mo 

Botta's American Revolution, 1 vol., 8 vo. 
Park Madison, or the Senator's Son, 12 mo 

Mann's Lecture's on Education, 12 mo 

Faggot of French Sticks, 12 mo 

Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1S54, 12 

mo 

Dr. Butler's Addresses, 12 mo 

Songs and Ballads of the Revolution, 12 

mo 

Pioneer History of Ohio 

Catechism of Familiar Things, 12 mo.... 

Tales of the Southern Border, 12 mo 

Ministering Children, 12 mo 

Stories about Birds, 18 mo 

Stories about Animals 

Stories about the Insect World, 18 mo .... 

The Week's Delight, IG mo 

Prime's Travels 2 vols., 12 mo 

Cruise of the North Star, 12 mo 

Alderbrook, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Mclntire on the Globes, 12 mo 

Kames' Elements of Criticism, 12 nio 

Lives of tlie Brothers Humboldt, 12 mo . . 

Ricard's Rome, 3 vols, 10 mo 

Colman's Letters from Europe 

The Arabian Nights, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Kitto's History of Palestine, 12 mo 

Xenojihon's Anabasis and Memorabilia, 12 



Cicero's Offices, 12 mo 

The Spectator, 8 vols., 16 mo 

The Irish Confederates, 12 mo 

Land and Lea, 12 mo 

Napoleon and his Marshals, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Kern's Landscape Gardening, 12 mo 

Barrow's Arctic Voyages, 12 mo 

Sismondi's Italian Republics, 12 mo 



$ 50 
50 
50 



50 
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1 35 
1 25 
7 50 

3 00 

3 00 

10 50 

75 



1 


25 


1 


25 




45 




45 


3 


00 


2 


00 


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1 


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85 



1 12 

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90 

75 

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88 
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90 
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6 00 
90 

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45 
GO 



TITLES. 



Holdich's Life of Fisk, 8 vo 

Life of Dr. Alexander, 12 mo 

The Lost Senses, 12mo 

Sandwich Island Notes, 12 mo 

Zschokke's History of Switzerland, 12 mo 

Keppel's Borneo, 12 mo 

Sismondi's Literature of Europe, 2 vols., 

12 mo 

The Mysteries of Bee Keeping, 12 mo . 

The British Spy, 12 mo 

The Progress of Astronomy, 12 mo . . . 

The Course of Creation, 12 mo 

Alcott on Life and Health, 12 mo 

Bell on the Hand, 12 mo 

Keith's Harmony of Prophecy 12 mo. 

Lorenzo Benoni, 12 mo 

Keith's Evidence of Prophecy, 12 mo . 

Life of Cranmer, 1 vol., 18 mo 

Keith's Demonstration of Christianity, 12 

mo 

D'Aubigue's Reformation, 5 vols., 12 mo 
Tschudi's Peruvian Antiquities, 12 mo. .. 
Wild Scenes and Wild Hunters .12 mo. .. 

Burnet's North West Territory, 8 vo 

Kendall's Santa Fe Expedition, 2 vols., 8 



Forest Life and Forest Trees, 12 mo 
Duer's Constitutional Jurisprudence, IS 

mo 

Battle of Waterloo, 12 mo . 

Springfield Armory, 16 mo 

Upham's Disordered Mental Action, 18 mo 

Upham's Madam Guj'on, 2 vols., 12 mo . . 

The Religion of Geology, 12 mo 

Genesis and Geology, 12 mo 

Beecher's Lectures to Young Men, 12 mo. 

Ossian's Poem's, 12 mo 

Scott's Poems, 12 mo 

Montgomery's Poems, 12 mo 

Poems of Alisses Davidson 

Minnie Ilermon, 12 mo 

Wonderful Inventions, 12 mo 

William Tell and Andreas Ilofer, 16 mo . . 
Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1855, 12 

mo 

Wild Scenes and Song Birds, 8 vo 

Harper's Story Books, 15 vols, in 5, 12 mo 

Miall's Early Christianity, 12 mo 

Footsteps of our Forefathei's, 18 mo 

Proverbs for the People, 12 mo 

History of the Huguenots, 2 vols., 12 mo 
Lardner's Natural Philosophy, 3 vols., 12 

mo 

Schaff 's America, 12 mo 

The Old Bell of 76,... 

The Yankee Tea Party 

Howard and the Prison World, 12 mo 

Todd's Student's Manual, 12 mo .... 

Life and Letters of Dr. Orlin, 2 vols., 12 

mo 

Webster and his Master Pieces, 2 vols., 12 

mo 

Life of John Quincy Adams, 12 m» 

The Hive of the Bee Hunter, 12 mo 

Views Aloot, 12 mo 

j Voyages of a Naturalist, 2 vols., 12 mo. . 

Journey to Mount Ararat, 12 mo 

Barrington's Sketdies, 12 mo 

Balloon Travels, 12 mo 

Hawthorne's True Stories, 12 mo, 

Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, 2 vols., 1 

mo 

Hawthorne's Wonder Book, 12 mo 

Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales, 12 mo.. 
Hawthorne's Snow Image, 12 mo 



Cost. 



2 vols in 1, 12 mo 



S2 00 


1 25 


1 00 


1 00 


1 GO 


45 


1 80 


1 00 


60 


1 00 


1 25 


1 00 


60 


1 00 


1 00 


60 


1 00 


1 37 


2 50 


I 25 


1 50 


2 00 


2 50 


75 


45 


90 


50 


45 


2 00 


1 25 


63 


75 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 25 




59 


1 25 


1 50 


3 75 


1 00 


1 00 


90 


1 50 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


95 


92 


2 00 


2 50 


1 25 


1 00 


1 25 


90 


45 


1 25 


1 00 


75 



424 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



Headley's Cromwell, 12 mo 

Famous Persons and Places, 12 mo 

Lyman's Webster, 2 vols., 12 mo 

The Teacher's Last Lesson, 12 mo 

Light on the Dark River, 12 mo 

Life of Curran, by his Son, 12 mo 

The Mission, or Scenes in Africa, by Mar- 

ryat, 12 mo 

Longfellow's Poems, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Spalding's Japan Expedition, 12 mo 

Smith's Elements of the Laws. 12 mo 

Health. Disease and Remedy, 18 mo 

Durtjin's Travels in the East, 2 vols., 12 



Durbin's Travels in Europe, 2 vols., 12 mo 

The Soul and the Body, 18 mo 

Potter's Science and the Arts, 12 mo 

Professional Duties of Attorney's, 12 mo. . 
Arthur's Household Library, 12 vols, in 6, 

18 mo 

Poets and Poetry of America, 8 vo 

Poets and Poetry of England, 8 vo 

Bunsen's Life of Niebuhr, 12 mo 

Motley's Dutch Republic, 3 vols., 8 vo 

Help's Spanish Conquest, 2 vols., 12 mo. . 

Life of Dr. Drake, 12 mo 

Baird's Christian Retrospect 

Bell's Life of Canning, 12 mo 

Catlin'a North American Indians, 2 vols., 

8 vo 

Tupper's Poetical Works, 12 mo 

Waylnnd'a Political Economy, 12 mo 

Evenings at Home, 12 mo 

Ship and Shore, 12 mo 

Sea and Sailor, 12 mo 

Barnard's National Education, 8 vo 

The Inventor's G ,ide, 12 mo 

Life of Summerfield, 12 mo 

Alison's Europe, 6 vols., 8 vo 

McCrie's Life of Knox, 12 mo 

McCrie's Reformation in Italy, 12 nio 

McCrie's Reformation in Spain, 12 mo. ... 

History of the Waldenses, 12 mo 

Fitch's Physical Geography, 12 mo 

History of Banking, fi vo 

History of >Iedicine, 8 vo 

The Grinnell Expedition, 8 vo 

Reed's English Literature, 12 mo 

Taylor's India, China, and Japan, 12 mo. 

Taylor's Poems, 1 vol., 12 mo 

Olin's Travels in the East. 2 vols., 8 vo. . . 

Palcy's Horae Paulinae, 12 mo 

Stiles' Austria, 2 vols., 8 vo 

Richardson's Arctic Expedition, 12 mo. ... 

Howe's Scots Worthies 8 vo 

I lowe's Ohio, 8 vo 

Prescott's Phillip IT., 2 vols., 8 vo 

The California and Oregon Trail, 12 mo. 
Memorials of the English JIartyrs, 12 mo. 
The Decisive Battles of the World, 12 mo. 
The Silver Cup of Sparkling Drops, 12 

mo 

MiU'a Literature of Great Britain, 2 vols., 

8 vo 

Nolte's Fifty Years in Both Hemiflpherea, 

12 mo 

Sch'wlcraft's Thirty Years, 8 vo 

Schoolcraft's Mississippi, 8 vo 

Aunt Kitty's Tales, 12 mo 

To Love and to be Loved, and Time and 

Tide, 2 vols, in 1, 12 mo 

Mortimer's College Life, 16 mo 

Hi'itory for Hoys, 10 mo 

Phillip Randolph, and Daniel Boone, 2 

void, in 1 12 mo 



Cost. 



$1 25 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

1 25 

62 

2 00 
1 25 

1 00 
60 

2 00 
2 00 

45 

75 



8 00 
3 00 
3 00 

1 25 

00 

2 00 

1 25 
1 25 

45 

7 25 
1 25 
1 25 

75 
1 00 
1 00 
5 00 
1 25 

70 
7 10 
1 50 

75 

65 

1 00 
75 

2 00 

3 50 
3 00 
1 25 

1 50 
75 

2 50 
75 

3 50 
1 25 
1 50 

3 00 

4 00 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 

90 



1 25 
3 50 

2 50 



The Cottage Fireside, 18 mo 

Tales of the Scottish Peasantry, 18 mo. ... 
Ray's Medical Jurisprudence of Insanity, 

8 vo 

Forster's British Statesmen, 8 vo 

Annals of San Francisco, 8 vo 

Miss Beecher's Letters on Health, 16 mo. . 

Gayarre's Louisiana, 3 vols., 8 vo 

Anthon's Greek Literature, 12 mo 

Barritt's Thoughts and Things at Home 

and Abroad, 12 mo 

Hall's Legends of the West, 12 mo 

Shea's Mississippi Valley, 8 vo 

Henry's Life of Calvin, 8 vo 

The Araucanians, 12 mo 

History of Texas, 2 vols. , 8 vo 

Frank Netherton, 16 mo 

E wbank's Hydraulics, 8 vo 

Bartlett's Narrative, 2 vols., 8 vo 

The Art Student in Munich, 12 mo 

Life and Letters of Story, 2 vols.. 8 vo. 
Winthrop's New England, 2 vols., 8 vo 

Prior's Life of Burke, 2 vols. 12 mo 

Life of Wordsworth, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Eliott's Harvard College, 12 mo 

Scott's Demonology and Witchcraft, 18 mo 

Great Truth's by Great Authors 8 vo 

Josephus, 2 vols., 8 vo 

Village Life in Egypt, 12 mo 

Ewbank's Brazil 8 vo 

Squier's Nicaragua, 2 vols., 8 vo 

Arnold's History of Rome, 8 vo 

Johnston's Agricultural Chemistry, 12mo 

Woman in America, 18mo 

AVhittisr's Old Portraits, 12mo 

India, Ancient and Modern, 8vo 

Annual and Scientific Discovery, 1656, 

12mo 

The Two Roads, ]2mo 

Miss Beecher's Physiology and Calisthen 

ics, 12mo 

Lewis and Clark's Travels, 2 vols. 18mo. . 
Watson's Annals of Philadelphia, 2 vols 

8vo 

Historical Sketches of Kentucky 

The Conspiracy of Pontiac, 8vo 

Thalatta, A Book for the Sea Side, 12mo. . 

Whittier's Recreations, 12mo 

Whittier's Songs of Labor, and Whittier's' 

Chapel of the Hermits, 2 in 1 vol . 12mo 
Osborn's Polar Regions, j „ ^ 33^^^ 
Jerman s St. Petersburg,) 
Vegetable Substances used for Food, 18mo. 

The Knout and the Russians, ]2mo 

Everett's Works, 2 vols., 8vo 

Buist's Kitchen Gardner, 12mo 

Colman's European Agriculture, 2 vols. 

8vo 

Salad for the Solitary, 12rao 

Salad for the Social, 12mo 

Ijeigh Hunt's Autobiography, 1 v. 12mo. 

Line Upon Line, 18mo 

Precejit Ui)ou Precept, 18mo 

FarOir, 18mo 

Near Home, 18mo 

Prose Writers of Germany, 8vo 

Hermlon's Amazon, 8vo 

The Inebriate'.s Hut, IHmo 

Hugh Miller's Legends of Scotland, 12mo. 

Edgar Clifton, 12mo 

Dr. Alden's Storic ■•. 5 vols, in 2, 18mo. ... 

Venetian Hi.story, 2 vols. 18mo 

Uncle Philip's Evidences of Christianity, 

18mo 

Undo Philip's Greenland, 18mo 



425 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



Uncle Philip's Natural Ilistory, IPmo .... 
Uncle Philip's American Forest, 18mo.... 
Uncle Philip's New York, 2 v. in 1, 18mo. . 
Uncle Philip's New Hampshire, 2 v. in 1, 

18mo 

Uncle Philip's Massachusetts, 2 vols, in 1, 

18mo 

Uncle Philip's Whale Fishery, 2 vols, in 1, 

18mo 

Robertson's Charles V, 8vo 

Koliertson's America, 8vo 

Neal's History of the Puritans, 2 vols. 8vo. 
Eliot's Ilistory of Liberty, 4 vols. 12mo.. . 

Frothinfrham's Siege of Boston, 8vo 

Sumner's Orations and Speeches, 3 vols. 

12mo 

Life anil Works of Fisher Ames, 2 vols. 8vo 
Arvine's Cyclopedia of Anecdotes, 8vo . . . 

Story's Sliscellanies, 8vo 

Wilson on Punctuation, 12mo 

Bancroft's Miscellanies, 8vo 

The .\ge of Fable, 12mo 

Winthrop's Speeches, 8vo 

Life in India, IGmo 

Story's Coramcntiiries, 2 vols. 8vo 

At Home and .^^broad, T2mo 

British and American Oratory, 3 vols. 12mo 
Thiers' French Revolution, 4 vols. 8 vo. . . 
Thiers' Consulate and Empire, 2 vols. 8vo 

Humboldt's Cuba, 12rao ;. 

Grant's American Lady, 12mo 

Taylor's Ireland, 2 vols. ]8mo 

Wanderin ps in Corsica, 12mo 

Jack Halyard, ICrao 

Forecastle Tom, 18mo 

Sunny Side, ]8mo 

Barnard's Normal Schools 

Qrote's History of Greece, 12 vols. 12mo. . 

Romance of American History, IGmo 

Trasfic Scenes in the History of Maryland, 

IGmo 

Youns Americans Abroad, IGmo 

Hooker's Physiology, 12mo 

Physician and Patient, 12mo 

Man of Business, 12mo 

Youatt on the Horse, 12mo 

Youatt on the Hog, 12mo 

Touatt on the Sheep, 12mo 

Mineral and Theimal Springs, 12mo 

Life of Gallaudet. l2mo 

Mexican War, by Mansfield, l2mo 

Wit and Wisdom of Sidney Smith, 12mo. . 

Gold and the Gospel, 12mo 

Hawes' Lectures to Young Men, IGmo .... 

Thomson's Educational Essays, 12mo 

Thomson's Biographical Sketches, ]2mo . . 

Thomson's Letters from Europe, 12mo 

Lives of Distinguished Shoemakers 

Irving's Life of Washington, 3 vols. 8vo. . 

Habits and Men, ]2mo 

Table Traits, 12mo 

Saxton's Hand Book, vol. 4, 12mo 

Sinai and Palestine, 8vo 

Maginn's Homeric Ballads, 12mo 

Kitto's Bible Illustrations, 8 vols. 12mo.. 

A Kiss for a Blow, ]8mo 

Ocean Work, Ancient and Modern, IGmo. . 

Brass and Iron Founder, 12mo 

Green Mountain Boys, 12mo 

The Ranger, 12mo 

Nile Notes of a Howadji, 12mo 

Howadji in Syria. 12mo 

Mayo's Popular Superstitions, 12mo 

Mrs. Lee's Captain Smith's Horse and 

Dog, IGmo 



Cost. 



$0 35 
35 


7u 


70 


70 


70 


1 50 


: 50 


2 75 


5 00 


2 25 


3 50 


4 50 


2 50 


3 50 


) 00 


2 00 


1 00 


3 00 


60 


7 50 


1 25 


3 37 


5 00 


3 50 


1 25 


75 


90 


] 50 


30 


37 


25 


2 50 


9 00 


60 


60 


75 


1 25 


1 25 


1 00 


1 25 


75 


75 


75 


1 25 


1 00 


1 25 


75 


35 


80 


80 


75 


4 50 


1 00 


1 25 


1 25 


2 25 


1 00 


8 00 


37 


38 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


87 


87 


75 


75 



TITLES. 



Mrs. Lee's African Crusoes, 16mo 

Marshall's Life of Washington, 2 v. 8vo. . 
Michaud's History of the Crusades, 3 vols. 

12mo 

Bristed's Five Years in an English Univer- 
sity, 2 vols., 12mo 

Life of Blennerhassett, 12mo 

Mysteries of Tobacco, IGmo 

Whaling and Fishing, IGmo 

Rollo's Travels in Europe, 6 vols, in 3, 

IGmo 

Settlers in Canada, by Marryat, IGmo . . 

Herbert Tracy, 12mo 

Headley's Alps and Rhine, 12mo 

Ileadley's Adirondack, ]2mo 

Willis' Health Trip, 12mo 

Willis' People I Have Seen, I2mo 

Kenrick's Ancient Egypt, 2 vols. 12mo. 

Brief Remarker, ]2mo 

Catachism of Familiar Things, 12mo . . . 
Gobat's Three Y'ears in Abyssinia, 12mo 
Sprague's Annals of the American Pulpit, 

2 vols. 8vo 

Science of Things Familiar, by Peterson, 

IGmo 

Ripley's War with Mexico, 2 vols. 8vo. . . . 

Brazil and La Plata, 12mo 

Life and Times of Zwingle, 12mo 

Chambers' Library for Young People, 20 

vols, in 10, ]8mo 

Taylor's Holy Living and Dying. 12mo 
Universal Ilistory on Christian Principles, 

6 vols. IGmo 

Harper's Story Books, 12 Nos. in 4 Vols., 

]2mo 

How to be a Man, 18mo 

Mexico and its Religion, 12mo 

Spooncr's Anecdotes of Painters, 3 vol 

IGmo 

Louis' School Days, 12mo 

Downing's Country Houses, 8 vo 

Stephens' Book of the Farm, 2 vols. 8vo. . 

German Lyrics, ]2mo 

Modern Pilgrims, 2 vols. 12mo 

Our Government, by McKinney, 12mo .... 

American Statesman, by Young, 8vo 

Episodes of Insect Life, 3 vols. 8 vo 

Homes of American Authors 8vo 

Littell's Living Age, 50 vols., 8vo 

Lowell's Poems, 2 vols., ]2mo 

The Excellent Woman, 12mo 

The Great Teacher, 12mo 

Lyell's Manual of Geology, 8vo 

Lyell's Geological Tour through the U. S.. 

2 vols. ]2mo 

Lyell's Second Visit to the U. S., 2 vols., 

12mo 

American Poultry Yard, 12mo 

Tales of a Grandfather, 4 vols., IGmo 

Looking-Glass for the Mind, and Gold 

Maker's Village, 2 in 1, IGmo 

Chances and Changes, and Never Too Late 

2 in 1, lOmo 

Simm's Revolution.ary Tales, 7 vols. 12mo 

Macaulay'a Speeches, 2 vols. 12mo 

Annual of Scientific Discovery for 1857 

12mo 

Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature, 3 

vols. 8vo 

List's National System of Political Econ- 
omy, 8vo 

Iletherington's Ilistory of the Church of 

Scotland, 8vo 

Benton's Thirty Years in the Senate, 2 vols. 

8vo 



Cost. 



5 00 


3 75 


3 CO 


95 


3S 


75 


3 00 


C'i 


50 


1 25 


1 25 


1 25 


1 25 


2 50 


75 


75 


1 25 


5 00 


1 00 


4 00 


I 25 


1 «5 


10 00 


1 00 


8 00 


3 00 


50 


1 00 


2 25 


75 


4 00 


4 00 


1 00 


1 75 


3 00 


3 00 


6 00 


4 00 


75 0(1 


1 50 


1 00 


1 60 


1 75 


1 85 


1 50 


1 00 


3 50 


76 


8 7n 


3 00 


1 25 


6 00 


2 50 


1 50 


5 00 



426 



Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



Hewitt's Land of Labor and Gold, 2 vols. 

16mo 

Pro«e Writers of America, 8vo 

Irish at Home and Abroad, 12mo 

Brougham's Lives of the Philosophers, 12 

mo 

Brewster's Natural Magic, 12mo 

Life and Works of Burns, 4 vols. ]2mo. . . 
Chalmers' Astronomical and Commercial 

Discourses, 2 vols, in 1, 12mo 

Library of Entertaining Knowledge, Ex- 
cept British Criminal Trials, 41 vols., 

16mo 

Hallig, or Sheep-Fold in the Waters, 12mo. 

Life of Audubon, 16mo 

Chemical Field Lectures for Agriculturists, 

12mo 

Poets and Poetry of Ireland, 8vo 

Scotia's Bards 

Translation of Herodotus, 12mo 

Translation of Thucydides, 12mo 

Translation of Sallust, 12mo 

Translation of Cresar, 12mo 

Translation of Plato, C vols., 12mo 

Translation of Livy, 4 vols. 12mo 

Translation of Euripides, 2 vols. 12mo . . . 

Translation of Virgil, 12mo 

Translation of Cicero's Academics, 12mo.. 
Translation of Cicero's Orations, 12mo .... 
Translation of Demosthenes' Orations, 12 

mo 

Ti-anslation of .^^schylus, 1 v. 12mo 

Translation of Tacitus, 2 vols. ISmo 

Translation of Sophocles, 1 vol. 12mo. ... 
Translation of Xenophon, Except Mem. & 

Anab., 2 vols. 12mo 

Transhition of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, 

2 vols. 12mo 

Akenside, IGmo 

Beattie, 16mo 

Butler, 2 vols. ICmo 

Campbell, 16mo 

Collins, 16mo 

Falconer, 16mo 

Goldsmith, IGmo 

Ora3', IGmo 

Milton, 3 vols, IGmo 

Parnell and Tickell, IGmo 

Pope, 3 vols. IGmo 

Thomson, 2 vols. IGmo 

White, IGmo 

Wordsworth, 7 vols. IGmo 

Young, 2 vols. IGrao 

8pen9(?r, 5 vols. IGmo 

Vaughan, IGmo 

Herbert. IGmo 

Crablie, .5 vols. IGmo 

Montgomery, 5 vols. 16mo 

Hood two supplementary vols., 12mo.... 

Squier's Central America, 2 vols 8vo 

History of Braddock's Defeat. Hyo 

History of Cott4,n, Wool and Silk, fivo . . . 

The Old Guard of Napoleon. 12mo 

Downing's Ilural Essays, Hvo 

Jardln's Naturalist's Own Library, 40 vols. 

Ifimo 

Oilman's Contributions to Literature, 12mo 

Homes for the People, 12mo 

Ruiurian Shores of the Black Sea, l2mo. . . 
Brm;tn'B Travels in Siberia, 2 vols. ]2mo. . 

Oaardian, 3 vols. IGmo 

Rambler, 3 vols. IGmo 

Adventurer, 3 vols. IGmo 

World, 3 voI«. ICmo 

Oonnolaseur, 2 voli. ICmo 



Cost. 


2 00 

3 00 

1 CO 

2 00 
45 

3 00 



TITLES. 



1 00 
3 00 
3 00 



4 50 
3 00 
1 50 

75 



1 50 
75 

1 50 

1 50 
75 
75 

1 50 
75 
75 
75 
75 
7G 

2 25 
' 75 
2 25 

1 50 
75 

2 25 
1 50 

3 75 
75 
75 

3 75 

3 75 

1 50 

4 00 

2 25 

2 50 
1 25 

3 00 

40 00 
1 -5 

1 50 
75 

2 00 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
J 50 



Idler, IGmo 

Mirror, 2 vols. ICmo 

Lounger, vols. IGmo 

Observer. 3 vols. IGmo 

Looker On, 3 vols., ICmo 

Index, IGmo 

Don Quixotte, 2 vols. 12mo 

Philo-ophy of the Weather, 12mo 

Steinmetz's History of the Jesuits, 2 vols. 

i2mo 

Whittier's Margaret Smith's .Tournal , 1 .'mo 
Greenwood Leaves, 1st and 2d Series, i 

vols. 12mo 

Coopei's Naval Commanders, 2 vols. 12mo 
United States Exploring Expedition, 5 v. 

8vo 

Mackay's Wickliffites. 12mo 

Humboldt's Cosmos, 4 vols. 12mo 

Campbell's Lord Chancellors, 7 vols. 8vo. 
Campbell's Chief Justices, 2 vols. 8vo .... 
Murray's British America, 2 vols. IGmo. . . 
D'Aubigne's Germany, England and Scot- 
land, 12mo 

Graham's History of the Colonies, 2 vols., 

8vo 

Charles Roussell, IGmo 

Life and Correspondence of Hannah More, 

2 vols. 12mo 

Hase's Ecclesiastical History, 8vo 

Lippincott's Gazetteer, 8 vo 

McCulloch's Commeroial Dictionary, 2 v. 

8vo 

Appleton's Dictionary of Mechanics, 2 v 

8vo 

Ure's Dictionary of Arts, &.C., 2 vols. 8vo 
Marshall's Decisions on Constitutional 

Law , 8 vo 

Memoirs of Samuel Worcester, 2 v. 12mo 

Franklin's Works, 10 vols. 8vo 

Perry's Japan E.xpedition, 8vo 

Kane's Expedition, 2 vols. 8vo 

Herbert's Cavaliers of England, 12mo. .. 
Herbert's Knights of England, France and 

Scotland, 12mo 

Herbert's Chevaliers of France, 12mo 

Longfellow's Specimens of European Po 

etry , 8vo 

Kent's Commentaries 4 vols 

Taylors' Cyclopedia of Travel, 8vo 

Kitto's Cyclopedia of Biblical Literature, 

2 vols. 8 vo 

Life and Writings of B. B. Edwards, 2 v 

12mo 

Prescotl's Kobertson's Charles V., 3 vols. 

8vo 

Pictorial History of England, 4 vols. 8vo 

Janney 's Life of Fox, 8vo 

Encyclopedia Americana, 14 vols., 8vo.. 

Irving's Wolfert's Roost, 13mo 

Cyclopedia of Architecture, 8 vo 

Anlhon's Classical Dictionary, 8vo 

Brande's Encyclopedia of Science, Litera- 
ture and Art, 8vo 

Goldsmith's Works, 4 vols. ]2mo 

Addison's Works. vols. 12mo 

Gui/.ot's Hi.story of Civilization, 4 v. ]2mo 
Washington's Administration, 2 vols. 8vo. 
Sparks' Life of (Jouveneur Morris, 3 vols 

8vo 

Life md Correspondence of Pres. Reed, 3 

vols. 8vo 

Davis' Logic of Mathematics, 8vo 

Life of the Ilaldanes, 8vo 

Life of Dr. Arnold, 8vo 

Todd's Summer Rerj-eations, 12mo .... 



427 

Catalogue of Books. — Continued. 



TITLES. 



The Federalist, 8vo 

Mother's Recompense, 12mo 

Home Influence, 12mo 

Nature in Disease, l2mo 

Watson's Poetical Quotations, 12mo 

De Quincey's Confessions of an Opium 
Kater, 16mo 

De Quincey's Biographical Essays, IGmo. . 

De Quincey's Narrative and Miscellaneous 
Papers, 2 vols. IGmo 

De Quincey's Literary Reminiscences, 2 v. 
16mo 

De Quincey's Historical and Critical Es- 
says, 2 vols. IGrao 

De Quincey's Essays on Philosophical 
Writers, 2 vols. 16mo 

Nile Boat, 8vo 

Whipple's Lectures and Essays, 3 v. 12mo 

Calhoun's Works, 6 vols. 8vo 

Correspondence of the Revolution, or Let- 
ters to Washington^ 4 vols 8vo 

Clay's Works, except Life and Correspond- 
ence, 2 vols., 8 vo 

Home's Introduction to the study of the 
Scriptures, 2 vols., 8 vo 

Madison Papers, 3 vols., 8 vo 

Lingard's England, 13 vols., 12 mo 

Moore's Life of Sheridan, 2 vols., 12 mo. . 

Wilson's Ornithology, with Plates, 2 vols., 
8 vo 

Pycroft's Course of Reading, 12 mo 

Tasso's Jerusalem, 16 mo 

Hamilton's Works, 7 vols , 8 vo 

Pardoe's Louis XIV., 2 vols. 12 mo 

Hind's and Jeremie's Church History of 
the Three First Centuries, 2 in 1, 12 mo. 

Cox's Sacred History, and Hale's History 
of the JeiTs, 2 in 1 

Cox's Bible Antiquities, 12 mo 

Roman History, 3 vols., 12 mo 

Grecian History, 2 vols., 12 mo 

Ockley's History of the Saracens, 12 mo. . 

Beckman's Hi'story of Inventions, 2 vols., 
12 mo 

Richardson's Geology, 12 mo 

Smith's Geology, and Scripture, 12 mo 

Humboldt's Travels, 4 vols., 12 mo 

Hun?boldt's Views of Nature, 12 mo 



Cost. 



$2 00 

75 

40 

1 25 

1 25 



1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


2 00 


2 Oil 


12 00 


9 00 


3 50 


4 00 


9 00 


13 00 


2 00 


i 00 


1 25 


15 75 


3 50 



TITLES. 



Kelley's Russia. 2 vols., 12 mo 

Ennemoser's History of Magic, 2 vols., 12 

mo 

Mantell's Fossils in the British Museum, 

12 mo 

Bechstein's Cage and Chamber Birds, 12 

mo 

Pictorial History of China, 12 mo 

Pictorial History of India, 12 mo 

Neander's First Planting of Christianity, 

2 vols., 12 mo 

Neander's Memorials of Christian Life, 12 

mo 

Neander's History of the Church, 8 vols., 

12 mo 

Ranke's History of the Popes, 3 vols., 12 

mo 

Milton's Prose works, 5 vols;, 12 mo .... 
Roscoe's Life of Leo X , 2 vols., 12 mo. . 

Roscoe's Lorenzo de Medici, 12 mo 

Machiavelli's History of Florence, 12 mo 

Burke's Works, 7 vols., 12 mo 

Bacon's Essays, Apothegms. &c., 12 mo. 

British Museum, 6 vols 

Modern Traveler, 33 vols , 16 mo 

Bridgewater Treatises, 12 vols., 12 mo... 

British Manufactunr, 6 vols 

Life and Works of Sir Isaac Newton, 2 

vols., 8 vo 

Institutes of Justinian, 8 vo 

Howitt's Rural and Domestic Life in Ger- 
many 

Hogg's Tales and Sketches, 6 vols 

History of the British Colonies, 10 vols 

Goethe's Works, 3 vols 

Junius' Letters, 2 vols 

Reynold's Literary Works, 2 vols 

Coxe's History of Austria, 3 vols 

Smith's Dictionary of Grecian and Roman 

Biography, 3 vols., 8 vo 

Ruskin's Modern Painters, 2 vols 

Papers of the Proceedings of the Royal So- 
ciety, 181)0—1837, 3 vols 

Lodge's Portraits of Illustrious Personages, 

10 vols 

Encyclopedia Metropolitana, 29 vols., 4to 
Encyclopedia Britanica, new edition, 21 

vols., 4to 



Cost. 



Note. — The price of Bohn's and other English editions of books, contained in the closing part of the 
Catalogue, is unknown at present, but can be furnished hereafter to the townships receiving said works 



APPEA'DIX IT, 



DECISION OF THE SUPREME COUllT ON THE 
SCHOOL LAW. 



: The City of Lafayette v. Jenners. 

PETITION for Rehearing. 

Perkins, J. — In this case, an earnest petition for a re-hearing has 
been filed; and, while the Court consider that the question involved 
has been so fully presented in the opinions delivered in previous 
cases in which it has arisen, that its re-examination is a work of su- 
pererogation ; yet, respect for the able counsel who ask the re-hear- 
ing, and for the people of the cities and towns who are so deeply in- 
terested in the subject, induces us to depart from the usual practice, 
in cases where the Court is satisfied with the decision rendered, of 
simply overruling the petition, and to again briefly review the points 
presented. 

The Constitution of Indiana ordains that the General Assembly 
shall *' provide, by law, for a general and uniform system of common 
schools, wherein tuition shall be Avithout charge and equally open to 
all." Sec. 1, Art. 8, It also ordains that that " Assembly shall 
provide for the election by the voters of the State, of a State Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction." Sec. 8, Art. 8. Now the ques- 
tion presents itself, what is the meaning to be given to these consti- 
tutional provisions ? 

Judge Ilovey, himself a prominent member of the Convention that 
framed them, as was Judge Peliit, who decided the case at bar be- 
low, in delivering the opinion of this Court in Greencastle township, 
&c. V. Black, in 1854, said : 

*' It was evidently the intention of the framers of the Constitution 
to place the common school system under the direct control and 
supervision of the State, and make it a quasi department of the 
State government." 

Judge Stuart, in the same case, said : 

" Common schools are thus to be established as a State institu- 
tion, under the Superintendent of Public Instruction as its official 
head, and to be supported as to tuition, by State funds." 



432 

Judge GooJciyis, in delivering the opinion of the Court, in 1856, in 
Quick V. Springfield township, said : 

'" The people of the State were seeking, by a Constitution, to de- 
vise a system which should convey the means of instruction (in 
common schools,) equally to every child in the State." 

And again, in Quick v. Whitewater township, the Court said, that 
the Constitution had " made the (common school) education of the 
children of the State, a public duty of the State.'' 

And again, in 1857, in Adamson v. the Auditor, Ac, the Court 
said : 

" According to the decision in Greencastle township v. Black, 5 
Ind., 557, the provision in that law (the school law,) authorizing 
township trustees to assess taxes for paying teachers of common 
schools, is unconstitutional because the power of voting taxes for 
that purpose is vested by the Constitution in- the Legislature alone. 
As to such taxes the law must be uniform throughout the State. 
Quick V. Whitewater township, 7 Ind. R. 570. Quick v. Springfield 
township, id. 636." 

Thus far the case rests upon the provisions of the Constitution we 
have quoted. They enjoin one general uniform system of com- 
mon schools ; which, to be such, all admit, must operate alike in town 
and country. No other provision was needed in that instrument to 
produce such a system. 

But it does contain another provision, viz : that the General As- 
sembly shall not pass any local or special law providing for the sup- 
port of common schools. Sec. 22, Art. 4. 

And the question arises: Why was that prohibitory section insert- 
ed? To what was it addressed ? What was its design ? It was not 
to establish a general system of common schools, for that had al- 
ready been plainly provided for. What was its object ? What could 
it be addressed to but city and town schools ? We cannot suppose 
that in so carefully considered an instrument as a State Constitution,' 
it was inserted without aim, without some meaning. What was it ? 

The question is easily answered, when considered in the light of 
history. Under our former Constitution, we had had two systems of 
common schools, the general and the local, and the local had broken 
down the general system, and neither .had flourished. See Green- 
castle township V. Black, supra. This was an evil distinctly in the 
view of the Convention which framed the new Constitution ; and it 
was determined that tlie two systems should no longer co-exist ; that 
the one general system should be continued, strengthened by addi- 
tional aids, and that tlui counteracting local system should go out of 
existence — should cease. 

We have said that under the former Constitution, the local school 
system broke down the general one : and the same would be the re- 
sult were both tolerated under the ])resent Constitution. An ordinary 
amount of knowledge of human nature, and the motives that govern 
legislative bodies, must suffice to convince any one of this fact. The 
constituents of members representing counties having towns and 



433 

cities which had adopted the local system would, to a great extent, 
prefer to have no other to interfere with that ; they would have no 
interest in keeping up the general system ; and hence, their repre- 
sentatives would naturally unite with the enemies of that system in 
the Legislature, to render it inefficient, merely nominal ; and, under 
such influences, it would wither, if not die. While, on the other 
hand, if to obtain schools for their own constituents, they were com- 
pelled to vote them to all the people of the State, the efficiency and 
permanency, as Avell as equality and uniformity of the general sys- 
tem would be maintained. 

The question next occurs, is the act of 1855, authorizing cities 
and towns to pay teachers of common schools by taxation of the citi- 
zens, a local law? 

The Court is not insensible to the difficulty (vf determining, in many 
cases under our Constitution, what constitutes such a law. The 
question is often one of much embarrassment ; and few authorities 
are found to aid in its solution. But in the present case, it would 
seem that there could be but little difficult}' in arriving at a correct 
conclusion. The subject of the act of 1855, it will be observed, is 
not the organization of city and town corporations, but the main- 
tenance of public or common schools, and taxation for that purpose. 
And we have seen that common schools as a whole, are made a State 
institution — a system co-extensive with the State, embracing within 
it, every citizen, every foot of territory, and all the taxable property 
in the State. The whole territory of the State is divided into school 
districts, under the general school system, including the towns and 
cities — they are school districts. Now, a law that is less general 
than the single subject upon which it is to operate, cannot, as a gen- 
eral rule, certainly, be a general law. But, on the other hand, if it 
be as general as that subject, it certainly will, as a general rule, 
be a general law. 

Here, as we have seen, the subject is common schools. The sub- 
ject embraces all the persons and all the property of the State. Yet, 
this laAv of 1855, operates, and is designed to operate, only upon a 
•portion of the persons and property of the State ; to be operative 
only in a part of the school districts. The State is divided into dis- 
tricts for common school purposes. The cities and towns form a 
part of the districts, and must do so, to render the school system 
general and uniform. Now, suppose the school law in terms pro- 
vided that taxation for common schools, and the management of the 
system, should be uniform except in that portion of the school dis- 
tricts situated in towns and cities ; but that in such districts, a tax, 
additional to that levied in the rural districts, might be imposed, and 
a dift'erent organization and management of the schools adopted : 
would any one pretend that the law thus framed was uniform in its 
operation as rerpiired by the Constitution ; and not local ? See 
The State v. Barbee, 8 Ind., 258. Yet, such is the school law 
of the State if the act of 1855 is apart of it; for the additional tax- 
es levied by cities and towns for school purposes, are levied only by 



434 

virtue of tliat law of the State specially authorizing them. It con- 
stitutes one law, one scale of taxation, for one part of the school 
districts, and another for the other part. But here we are met with 
the argument that cities and towns are, in a measure, independent 
governments, imperia in impcrio^ and may be indefinitely endowed 
with the power of taxation. 

We admit that great powers may be conferred upon municipal cor- 
porations for corporate purposes within constitutional limits. The 
City of Aurora v. West, 9 Ind., 74. But the State cannot confer 
upon such corporations the right to do that which the Constitution 
forbids to be done by any power in the State. 

Yet, by the law of 1855, an attempt to confer such right is made. 
The constitution provides that common or free public schools shall 
be supported by State taxation alone- — supported, as a State system, 
by a uniform and general hiAv. Taxes, therefore, levied for the sup- 
port of such schools, are levied for a State purpose, not a city or 
town purpose. Now, if the constitution requires all taxes for such 
purpose to be levied by a general, uniform law, operating alike upon 
all the persons and property of the State, and forbids the passage of 
any other, can the State authorize municipal corporations to raise 
taxes for such State purpose, in addition to those raised by the 
general law of the State, thus destroying the uniformity of the 
school system and taxation for its support, and evading the constitu- 
tional restriction? If so, surely constitutional checks are worth- 
less. We have not been able, as yet, to reconcile our consciences to 
this mode of triHing with the fundamental laAv of the State. 

The State legislature cannot charter toAvns and cities to carry on 
common schools. They must be carried on by the State. Can the 
legislature, under our constitution, charter cities and towns with the 
power to create banks? 

Here, we might close this opinion; but it is due, per]u\ps, to coun- 
sel, that we should notice two or three inconvenicncies which it is 
suggested must arise from this decision. 

1. It is claimed that it will annihihite all colleges and academies. 
This is not so. The constitution limits the general legislation in- 
volved in this decision to common schools. Colleges, academies, and 
charitable associations, are not included within the ordinary or tech- 
nical meaning of the term common schools. The State is left, by 
her constitution, free to encourage education, to any extent she 
may deem expedient, by such agencies. 

2. It is said, if cities and towns cannot tax for common schools, 
neither can they for streets, &c. This is not so. The Constitution 
.says laws on the subject of highways shall be general. It does not 
so provide as to streets, and a highway is not a street, either tech- 
nically or in common parlance. This has been judicially settled by 
this Court. The Common Council of Indiiinapolis v. Croas, 7 Ind., 9. 

And here we cannot refrain from using the example put to illus- 
trate the correctness of the decision we have made. The Constitu- 
tion says there shall be one general uniform system of common 



435 

schools for all the children of the State, and that no local law shall 
be passed on the subject. 

The Constitution does not say that there shall be one general sys- 
tem of highways extending into every part of the State, and that 
there shall be no other. It simply says there shall be no local laws 
for opening, working on, and laying out highways, where highways may 
be needed. The Constitution enjoins no system of highways, but 
regulations as to working, &c. Statutory highways are not needed in 
cities, because streets there take their place, and streets are recog- 
nized in the Constitution and Statutes, as existencies distinct from 
highways. 1 K. S., p. 52 ; 2 R. S., p. 339. A general law for high- 
ways where they are needed, like one touching county seats, need 
only be as general as the particular subject matter, to comply with 
the Constitution. 

3. It is said that schools cannot be kept up in cities without local 
taxation. We are unable to see why. As the proceeds of taxation 
are, or may be, drawn from the treasury of the State per capita, that 
is upon the heads of the children, cities would seem to have the ad- 
vantage, as the great mass of floating population is within their lim- 
its. All this, however, is matter for legislative regulation within 
constitutional restrictions. It is not a question for the Court. 

4. The Court is charged, in annuling this law, with disrespect to the 
Legislature which enacted it. The Court knows its duty, touching 
this point, and will not hesitate to do it. It is the duty of the Court 
to respect the acts of the other departments of the government, to 
regard them, prima facie, as legal, to hesitate long, and weigh 
them well before it overthrows them. Those acts constitute, in the 
language of Judge McKinney, in Hedley v. The Board of Commis- 
sioners, &c., 4 Blackf., 116, "persuasive arguments ;''' still they are 
but arguments, and do not absolve the Court from the obligation to 
think for itself and decide for itself, in testing them by the para- 
mount law of the land, to which they must conform. See Noel v. 
Ewing, 9 Ind , 37. Maze v. The State, 4 Ind., 342. Beebe v. 
The State, 6 Ind., 501. Whiteneck v. The Indianapolis, &c., Co., 8 
Ind. 217. 

The petition is overruled with costs. 



REPORTS 



OF THB 



OFFICERS OF STATE 



OF 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

TO THE GOVERNOB, 

FOR 

THE YEAR 1857. 



PART SECONIX 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOBB-PB J. BINGHAM, STATE PBIKTER, 
1857. 



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A^^iuoaiHT" ^" 



:8} JO*/AWAiaVfl 



INDEX TO PART SECOND. 



Report of the Trustee* of the lostitHte for the Edaeatioo of the Blind 5 

Report of the Tnuteea of the Ingtitutioa for the Bducation of the Deaf and Dumb 47 

Report of Commiasionera and Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane 100 

Report of Trustees of W. &. B. Canal 173 

Report of Directors of State Prison 233 

Report of Secretar/of State 291 

Bei>ort«f State Bank of Indiana 341 



x\m)m THAI or xiidi^i 



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» .-. — <(iiAirtT ' ■ "I ;i 

» - > 

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W- -. • V 

ife' • ■'^'■■•■'- '■ 

im: . ....,". ♦it«;ii*ii ^ 



Doc. J^o. 1.] [ Part II. 

ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OP 



THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



INDIANA INSTITUTE 



FOR THE 



Cbucatian of tl)f llinli. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE PRINTER, 
1857. 

2 D. J.— 1. 



'■■] 'A '> '* 



OPFICERS OF THE INSTITUTE 



TRUSTEES, 

JAMES G. READ, President 

E. W. II. ELLIS, Secretary. 

JOHN" F. CARR, 

JOHN H. COOK, 

WM. B. McCULLOUGH, 

NATHAN B. PALMER. 

SUPERINTEN DENT, 

Dr. JAMES McWORKMAN. 

PRINCIPAL TEACHER, 

GRANVILLE M. BALLARD. 

TEACHER IN FEMALE DEPARTMENT, 

MISS ELIZA W. BOWMAN. 

MATRON, 

Mrs. JULIETTE McWORKMAN. 

TEACHER OF MUSIC, 

MISS LUCINDA M. MORLEY. 

PHYSICIAN, 

LIVINGSTON DUNLAP, M. D. 



/ . I 



TRUSTEES' REPOET. 



To His Excellency, Ashbel P. "Willard, 

Governor of the State of Indiana : 

In compliance with the requirements of Law, the Trustees of 
the Indiana Institute for the Education of the Blind, have the 
honor to submit their Eleventh Annual Report. 

The financial operations of the Institute for the year ending 
Oct. 31st, 1857, have been as follows: 

Receipts for 1857. 

Balance in Treasury, Oct. 31,1857 $8,858 52 

Receipts from Work Department 2,229 88 

From Pupils' Clothing refunded 179 68 

From Miscellaneous sources 20 00 

Advance from Counties for Pupils' Clothing 983 22 

Total $12,271 30 

^■"" ■ ' JExpenditures for lSb7. 

For Work Department $3,169 60 

For Miscellaneous Expenses 625 61 

For Current Expenses 8,466 51 

For Construction and Repairs 936 63 

For Printing and Stationery 127 25 

For Officers and Salaries 3,130 38 

For Fuel and Lights 1,517 99 

For Pupils' Clothing 1,165 24 

For Furniture Account 458 68 

For Sinking Fund Loan 6,000 00 

Total $25,597 ^9 



6 

Showing an excess of expenditure, of $13,326 59; but as a 
portion of the above-mentioned balance in the Treasury, to wit: 
the sum of $1,349 37, is an unexpended balance of the appro- 
priation for the new heating apparatus; the true excess of 
expenditures above the receipts of the Institute, and the existing 
appropriations, is the sum of $14,675 96. 

While the Board are aware that this over-draft is not ex- 
pressly provided for by statutory enactment, they find their 
justification in the necessities of the case, and particularly in the 
paramount provisions of the constitution. Section 1, of article 
IX, of that instrument, reads as follows : 

"Section 1. It shall be the duty of the General Assembly to 
provide, by law, for the support of the Institutions for the Ed- 
ucation of the Deaf and Dumb, and of the Blind; and also, 
for the treatment of the Insane." 

Had this duty been properly discharged, there would have 
been no question as to the propriety of the acts of the Trustees. 
The Board knew full well the high regard in which these insti- 
tutions were held by the people of the State, and felt that they 
would be recreant to the important trusts committed to their 
charge, if they failed to exert every possible energy, and assume 
every responsibility necessary to continue the Institute in oper- 
ation to the close of the term. On several former occasions, 
when the appropriations were exhausted, they had lent their 
individual names, and involved themselves pecuniarily, for the 
purpose of accomplishing this end. In the present case they 
had made such estimates and asked for such appropriations as 
they believed would be sufficient to carry the Institute to the 
close of the session. The estimate proved insufficient from 
various causes, chiefly, however, from the advance in every 
species of provisions, but as the deficiency occurred during the 
session of the Legislature, whose duty it was to provide against 
such a contingency, the Board regard themselves as fully 
exonerated. 

If, from any cause whatever, the estimates should be too small, 
or the Legislature, disregarding the estimates, should refuse to 
make a sufficient ajipropriation, must the Institute, in defiance 
of the wishes of the people, and the plain and unequivocal 



language of the constitution, be peremptorily closed? Or, should 
the Trustees, rather than be silent spectators of this calamity, 
and see the Blind sent back to desolate or dreary homes, en- 
deavor to prevent it by the use of their own individual means 
or credit, must they be maligned and censured by a Legislative 
body whose business it is to provide the means for its support? 
Conscious of having performed only our duty we leave these 
questions for the consideration of a generous and humane 
people. 

The following statement will show the annual expenditures 
for the support of the Institute for 1854-5-6 and 7 : 

Expenses for 1854 '. $13,978 34 ' 

Expenses for 1855 19,794 31 

Expenses for 1856 22,292 96 

Expenses for 1857 19,597 89 

The Board feel very confident, that, under the present man- 
agement and superintendence of the Institute, a further re- 
duction may be made in the expenditures. 

The number of pupils in attendance during these years were, 
respectively, us follows, to w^it: 

In 1854 77 

In 1855 77 

In 1856 73 

In 1857 63 

The Board have taken no further measures for the con- 
struction of the new heating apparatus, for want of the neces- 
sary appropriation. The expenditure already made for this 
purpose is for such portions of the work as will be of utility, 
whatever plan may be finally adopted. The work is much 
needed, and should be completed at the earliest possible day. 

The expenditures for the current year are estimated as follows : 

Estimated Expenditures for the year ending Oct. 31, 1858. 

For Current Expenses $8,000 00 

For Improvements and Repairs 1,000 00 

For Furniture 300 00 



8 

For Officers and Salaries 3,000 00 

For Incidental Expenses 1,000 00 

For Miscellaneous Expenses 1,000 00 

Total $14,300 00 

The claim against Dr. Elijah Newland, late Treasurer of 
State, amounting to $1,362 23, still remaining unadjusted, the 
Board, at their May session, 1857, adopted the following order: 

^^ Ordered, That the Governor be requested to bring suit, on 
behalf of the Institute, in the Marion Circuit Court, against 
Dr. E. Neavland, late Treasurer of State, for the sum alleged 
to be due from him." 

At the July session they ordered as follows : 

'■^Ordered, That the Attorney General be requested to bring 
suit, in the Marion Circuit Court, against Elijah Newland, 
late Treasurer of State, for the recovery of certain moneys 
alleged to be due from him to the Institute, and that the Secre- 
tary furnish him a copy of this order." 

It is hoped, therefore, that, by the prompt action of these offi- 
cers, this long litigated contest may be satisfactorily adjusted. 
It is due to Dr. Newland to say, that he has on all occasions 
courted a full and free investigation of this matter, and is ready 
at any moment to pay over such sums, if any, as may be finally 
adjudicated against him. 

In March, 1857, suit was commenced against the Trustees, in- 
volving the title to the ground occupied by the Institute, and 
thereupon they adopted the following order: 

"Whereas, Suit has been commenced against the Trustees of the 
Institute, in the Marion Circuit Court, involving the title to 
to the grounds occupied by the Institute, therefore, 

^^ Ordered, That the Secretary be directed to notify the Governor 
of the pendency of said suit, and request him to have such ac- 
tion taken as may best protect the interests of the State." 

In July, they adopted the following supplementary order : 



9 

^^ Ordered, That Hon. James Morrison be appointed attorney 
of this Board, in association with the Attorney General, in the 
case of the Jameson Heirs v. The Trustees of the Institute, and 
that the Secretary be directed to notify the Attorney General 
and the said Morrison of this appointment." 

While the Board entertain no doubt of the validity of the 
title of the State, they deemed it their duty to provide able and 
experienced counsel for its defense. 

The connection of Prof. Larrabee with the Institute as Super- 
intendent, expired by resignation on the 1st of February last, 
and his place was supplied by the election of Dr. James Mo- 
Workmau, of Boone county. 

Thus far the Board have found him, in all the requisits of a 
Superintendent, eminently qualified for the position, and bear 
cheerful testimony to the zeal and ability with which he has en- 
tered upon the discharge of its duties. A healthy economy has 
been introduced, which must result in the saving of several thou- 
sand dollars per annum in the expenditures. A more careful 
supervision has been exercised over the morals and habits of the 
pupils, and greater efforts made for their advancement in their 
several branches of study. 

At the close of the recent term the following pupils, upon the 
recommendation of the Superintendent, were graduated audi 
honorably discharged, to- wit: 

George O. Work, of Allen county, 
Aaron Geyger, of Lawrence county, 
Thankful C. Lovejoy, of Warrick county,, 
Mary C. Thrall, of Lagrange county, 
Emily J. Cole, of Switzerland county^ 
Kachel Martin,, of Randolph county. 

The Board trust tliey will ever bear in grateful remembrance 
the noble charity, which has contributed so much to their happi- 
ness and intellectual advancement, and that their future char- 
acters and careers in life may reflect credit upon the Institute, 
and furnish the highest and most sincere evidence of their 
gratitude. 

At the close of the term in July, the legislature having failed 



10 

to make provision for its continuance, the Board were con- 
strained to announce, with great reluctance and sincere regret, 
to the pupils and the public, that the future opening of the 
Institute was indefinitely postponed. The anxiety of the pupils 
and their grief upon learning the final result can be better 
imagined than described. Some were going to sad and dreary 
homes, some had no living relations at whose firesides they 
would be welcome, and others had before them only the choice 
between the poor house and private charity. 

But at the September term of the Board the following com- 
munication was laid before them, to-wit: 

"At a meeting of the officers of State, held on the 16th day 
of September, 1857, the following resolution was unanimously 
adopted. 

^^Resolved, That we advise the Treasurer of State to advance, 
out of any money in his possession belonging to the State of 
Indiana, sufiicient funds to support the Indiana Asylum for the 
Insane, and the Institutions for educating the Deaf and Dumb, 
and Blind. 

ASHBEL P. WILLARD, Governor of the State of Indiana, 
JOSEPH E. McDonald, Attorney General of the State, 
AQUILLA JONES, Treasurer of State, 
JOHN W. DODD, Auditor of State, 
DANIEL McCLURE, Secretary of Stated 

Upon this guaranty the Board resolved to re-open the Insti- 
tute on the 19th day of October, and notice to that effect was 
accordingly given. 

The following is the organization of the Institute for the en- 
Boing year: 

Dr. James McWorkman, Superintendent, salary $800, with 
board in the Institute. 

Mr. Granville M. BaHard, Principal Male Teacher, salary $400 
and board in the Institute. 

Miss EHza W. Bowman, Teacher in the Female Department, 
salary $200 and board in the Institute. 



11 

Mrs. Juliette McWorkman, Matron, salary $300 and board in 
the Institute. 

Miss Lucinda M. Morley, Teacher of Music, salary $300 and 
board in the Institute. 

Appended hereto will be found the Reports of the Superin- 
tendent, the Secretary and the Treasurer, to which attention is 
solicited. 

Respectfully, 

JAMl^:S G. READ, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 

E. W. H. Ellis, Secretary. 

Indianapolis, November 1, 1857. 



SUPEEOTENDENT^S EEPORT. 



JSis Excellency^ A. P. Willard, 

Sir: — On the 1st day of February, 1857, 1 entered upon th« 
discharge of my duties as Superiutendent of this Institution. 
With a knowledge of the unpleasant difficulties which had 
arisen to mar the usefulness of the Institution, embarrass and 
annoy those who had occupied the position before me, I confess 
I assumed its duties with fear and trembling and with an un- 
affected conciousness that my inexperience would for a period 
prevent my performing the important duties entrusted to me, 
not only to my own, but to the satisfaction of the public. I un- 
dertook, however, the duties devolved upon me with the deter- 
mination to work such a change in the management and general 
int'erual economy of the Institution as were evidently demanded, 
without giving offence to those with whom I was immediately 
connected, and secure their co-operation. In all my efforts to 
accomplish these results I have, at all times, had the encourage- 
ment and aid of the Board of Trustees. Some reforms and 
changes have been effected during my administration of the 
affairs of the Institution. Yet much, very much remains to be 
accomplished before that system, discipline and economy shall 
prevail which should characterize every establishment of this 
kind, and be satisfactory to the people whose public spirit and 
philanthropy have so liberally endowed our noble State charities. 
It also affords me pleasure to state, in this connection, that the 
officers and teachers associated with me in the management of 
the Institution, and also the pupils, with scarcely an exception, 
have manifested a ready disposition to aid me in introducing all 
needed reforms designed for its better government. I have 
taken special pains to explain to all within the Institution the j 



14 

necessity of discipline and the object of the rules which have 
been adopted to control its affairs. Thus far I have found that 
it has only been necessary to explain to the pupils the justness 
and propriety of a rule to secure its observance on their part. 

One great difficulty which has attended the management of 
the Institution has been the officious intermeddling of "out 
eiders,'' and I regret to say that this kind of interference is not 
confined altogether to those without. Notwithstanding the 
most diligent efforts of those having the good of the Institution 
at heart to prevent disaffection and to secure discipline, a mutin- 
ous spirit is occasionally manifested by its employees. One evil 
spirit of this kind can do much to cause disaffection and insub- 
ordination within the Institution and spread evil reports of its 
character abroad. I refer to this subject to show the necessity 
of an enforcement of ^he rules adopted for the government of 
the Institution, and that the public should not lend a willing 
ear to the tales of the mischief-maker. Although I have seen 
this spirit at work to foment disturbance, yet thus far I have 
escaped their evil influences. Ko sympathy should ever be ex- 
tended to those who set themselves up in opposition to legal au- 
thority; yet unfortunately there is in the community a class of 
persons who are ever willing to extend to the turbulent " aid and 
comfort." A competent Board of Trustees have supervisory 
charge of all that concerns its affairs, who are ever watchful of 
all that effects its character or its interests. To them should be 
submitted whatever may be deemed unjust in the administra- 
tion of the Institution, as the proper tribunal for the settlement 
and determination of the justness of all such complaints and for 
redress. 

During the past year Providence has smiled most propitiously 
upon our numerous family. No death or even serious case of ill- 
ness has occurred among either officers or pupils. "We flatter 
ourselves that this immunity from disease is attributable in no 
small degree to the rigid enforcement of the rules requiring 
regular hours for sleeping, eating and exercise, as well as fre- 
quent bathing. That these hygeinic means have had much to 
do in preventing disease amongst us can hardly admit of a 
doubt. Yet we feel that much is due our Physician, Dr. L. Dun- 
lap, whose watchful care, prompt and skilful interference in the 
administration of the appropriate remedies have evidently, in 



15 

many instances, averted what might have otherwise resulted iu 
serious and protracted disease. 

In our literary and musical department very commendable 
proficiency has been made by the most of our pupils. The ma- 
jority of the blind evince quite as great facility in acquiring 
education as the average of those blessed with sight. Indeed I 
am not quite sure but that in history, arithmetic, as well a« in 
the higher branches of mathematics, they even excel. Without 
the slightest disposition to underate the importance of a thorough 
system of education for the blind, I may be permitted to say that, 
in my judgment, teachers in their zeal to accomplish much, often 
fall short of the object in view. 

More attention should be paid to the elementary branches of 
education, and less to the higher. Pupils should be well taught 
in those branches which fit them for the active duties of life. 
To this, attention should be first directed. A sound English 
education, embracing the history and geography of our own 
country, combined with that which is of no less importance, a 
good trade, is what the blind most need. This much effected, 
and a great work has been performed, quite as much, I appre- 
hend, as can be accomplished in the time pupils are usually 
permitted to remain in our Institution. 

I would not be understood, however, as entertaining the 
opinion that the blind are not capable of attaining to the 
highest scale of education. Yet, considering the age that pupils 
generally attain before they enter the Institution, and the 
length of time they are permitted to remain, it is scarcely possi- 
ble to give them a thorough, or w^hat is sometimes termed a 
finished education, and at the same time such a knowledge of 
handicraft, as may enable them to support themselves respect- 
ably, i 

Of no less value to the blind is a good musical education. 
Many of them are able when they leave the school, to turn their 
musical acquirements to very profitable account. But aside 
from the importance of a musical education as a means of sup- 
port, there is nothing that affords the unfortunate blind so much 
consolation as the ability to perform well upon some musical 
instrument. It is this more than any other accomplishment, 
that possesses the influence to soothe his otherwise sad heart. 



16 

and rob the dark night through which he gropes his way, of 
much of its monotony. For this reason too much attention can 
hardly be bestowed upon this branch of education. 

If, after the accompUshment of a good English education, 
and the acquirement of a good trade, opportunity be offered 
them, the blind might properly be enlightened in the higher 
branches of education. But it may be questioned whether the 
State should be called upon to do more for this unfortunate 
class, than to give them that education, and instruct them in 
some employment, which will promote their usefulness, happi- 
ness, and capacity to provide for themselves. When this is done, 
it gives the blind themselves the means of further proHciency, if 
they desire it. 

In the Work Department, my highest expectations of the 
capacity of the blind to successfully prosecute certain branches 
of handicraft, have been more than realized. The manufacture 
of brooms, brushes, and various kinds of willow-work, are the 
leading branches taught in this department. Carpet-weaving, 
and the manufacture of mats and mattrasses, are pursued only 
to a limited extent. It has been found in most, if not all the 
institutions of this kind, that the manufacture of brooms is the 
most remunerative business yet discovered. Pupils are taught 
iu all the different employments followed in the Institution, so 
that wlion they quit the work-shops, they may be enabled to 
pursue that particular branch they may find most profitable. 
The manufacture of willow-work has not been made sufiiciently 
profitable, either in this or the eastern institutions, to warrant 
the opinion that it can be made a business which the blind can 
depend on as a means of acquiring a support. For this reason 
it has been abandoned in some of the older institutions, and may 
be in our own. In our Institute the younger boys are princi- 
pally oniployed in the manufacture of brushes; it is a business 
for which the blind seem to have a peculiar aptitude. The 
brushes made by them will not suffer by comparison, either in 
point of finish or durability, with those manufactured by 
mechanics who have the aid of sight. Our female pupils are 
generally employed in tyie manufacture of '•'• fancy head-work-" 
this species of handicraft, as its name implies, is purely fancy, 
and possesses no utility whatever. It is purchased by visitors 



17 

simply oil accouut of its novelty, and to show what can bo 
acciomplished by the blind. Even its novelty, however, is rapid- 
ly giving way, so that in a short time this oecnpation will fail, 
and become utterl}' protitless. We ai"e now making an eflbrt to 
teach plain sewing, knitting, etc., which promises to be quite 
successful. As an incentive, I offered a prize to the young lady 
who should knit the best pair of socks, and as a result several 
pairs were produced which exhibited satisfactory skill and 
capacity for this kind of work. 

In the JSTew York Institution, the manufacture of paper 
boxes, such as band-boxes, shoe-boxes, etc., has been tried, but 
even in that great city where the demand for such articles is 
greater than any where else, the business has not by any means 
afforded encouragement to the friends of the blind. 

Having reflected much on the necessity of introducing some 
new species of handicraft into, our Work Department adapted 
tc the capacity of the blind, particularly the females, it occurred 
to me that the manufacture of palm leaf hats would prove the 
most appropriate. That the blind will be able to manufacture 
hats of this sort, I have no doubt; and that it could be made a 
profitable employment in any part of the country, even the 
rural districts, will hardly be questioned. In accordance with. 
these views, I suggested to Mr. Cooper of the ISTew York Insti- 
tutiou, and Mr. Chapin of the I*enusylvania Institution, during 
a late visit, my conviction of the practicability of introducing-, 
int^) our Work Departments the manufticture of these hats,, and 
was gratified with the favor the suggestion met with from tliese 
intelligent gentleman, both of whom have had large experience 
in connection with the blind. I trust that upon the re-opeaing 
of this Institution, a full and fair trial will be given, to this 
business. 

Before closing my remarks upon this departmeat,, I desire to 
Qiiy that I am thoroughly convinced that some plan ought to be 
adopted to give our graduates permanent employment in our 
work-shops. Some such plan would not only better comport 
with the principles of benevolence, but would do honor to the 
State. A system of the kind, called the "Home Department," 
has already been put in operation in some of the eastern institu- 
tions, and although not fully approved by all who have charge 
2 D. J.— 2. 



18 

of institutious for the blind, yet Mr. Chapin, who has, perhaps, 
given the subject more attention, and has more fully attested its 
practicability dian any of his cotemporaries, speaks in the 
highest commendation of its workings. 

The following statement exhibits the business of the Work 
Department since the 1st day of February, 1857 : 

Cash received $1,600 43 

Value of Brooms manufactured $870 29 

Value of Brushes manufactured 95 61 

Value of Willow Work manufactured 114 70 

Value of Weaving. . , 166 54 

Value of Miscellaneous Articles 9 00 

Value of Articles manufactured by girls 94 42 



Total $1,350 56 

Expenses of Work Department. 

Amount expended for Material $463 75 

Salaries of Teachers 403 00 

$866 75 



'Showing a balance m. favor of Work department $483 81 

As no invoice of the amount of material on hand on the Ist 
day of February was taken, the above statement may not be 
precisely correct, but it is beUeved to approximate very nearl^jf a 
true statement. 

I regret to have to report that our building is very much out 
of repair. The failure of the heating apparatus introduced into 
the building some years since has had the eft'ect of deranging all 
our bathing fixtures, and has in various ways interfered with 
the comfort and convenience of our household. All the pipes 
connecting with the bath-rooms and water-closets are so much 
out of repair that they have been abandoned. At present the 
whole huilding is warmed by stoves. I need not add that the 
use of 8tf>ve8 in an extensive establishment of this kind requires 
constant watchfulness to prevent accidents by fire. We trust 
that before another winter the new heating apparatus which is 



19 

now partially completed will be put in operation, which will 
add not only to the comfort of all, but will materially obviate 
the danger from fire. Many minor repairs are imperatively de- 
manded to preserve the building, all of which, however, will 
have to lay over till the legislature again assembles, when it is 
hoped that the credit of the State will be redeemed by liberal 
appropriations for her unfortunate children, many of whom are 
now thrown out upon the world to buffet the waves of misfor- 
tune as best they can. 

You will see by the catalogue appended to the report, that 
the number of pupils in attendance the past year was sixty-three. 

Respectfully, 

J. McWORKMAN. 



CATALOGUE. 



LIST of Pupils in attendance during the year ending October 31, 

1857. 



No. 



NAMES. 



1 

2 
3 
4 

6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 



Aaron Gyger 

George Oliver Work 

Lawrence D. Taylor.; 

Garey Stafford 

Sarah S. Morgan., 

Margaret. Ellen Barnes 

Sarah Catharine Barnes.... 

John William Record 

Rachel Martin 

Robert Cope 

William T. Tooms 

Rebecca Sedam 

Nancy C. Smith 

Sarah Ann Hamilton 

Thomas L. Goodwin 

Mary Catharine Thrall 

Mary Ellen Smith 

Emily J. Cole 

Thankful Cordelia Lovejoy 

Catharine McKinsey 

Abram McClellan 

Lucina McClellan 

Charles McLain 

John Ford 

Mahala French 

Helen Marr Ayres 

Joseph Martin Perry 

Samuel Standford Lindley, 

Frederick Schlaw 

Thomas Sullivan 

Adam Hall 

Mary Margaret Cramer 

Louisa Briggs 

William S. Manning 

Mary Maria Crume 

Margaret Ann Paul 



RESIDENCE. 



Lawrence county ... 

Allen County 

Marshal county 

Union county 

Union county 

Decatur county 

Decatur county 

Marion county 

Randolph county ... 

Jefferson county 

Scott county 

Johnson county 

Harrison county .... 

Sullivan county 

Hancock county 

Lagrange county.... 

Harrison county 

Switzerland county 

Warrick county 

Clinton county 

Sullivan county 

Sullivan county 

Delaware county.... 

Marion county 

Henry county 

Switzerland county 

Marion county 

Washington county 
Dearborn county.... 

Adams county 

Boone county 

Noble county 

Clark county 

Vigo county 

Decatur county 

Ripley county 



CAUSE OF 
BLINDNESS. 



Scarlet Fever. 

Congenital. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Inflammation. 

Congenital. 

Fever. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Congenital. 

Inflammation. 

Cataract. 

Inflammation. 

Unknown. 

Congenital. 

Inflammation. 

Inflammation. 

Measles. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Accident. 



22 

List of Pupils. — Continued. 



No. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


CAUSE OF 
BLINDNESS 


S7 


Georse W. Briggs 


Clark county 




88 


Catharine Elizabeth Dixon 


Delaware county 

Bartholomew county... 
Gibson county 


Erysipelas. 
Congenital. 
Fever. 


«9 


Mary Ann Harden 


40 


Edwin Cory 


41 


Rosanna Garrison 


Morgan county 


Congenital. 
Scarlet Fever. 


4'^ 


Naomi Ewing 


Fountain county 

Boone county 


43 


Lydia Talbee 


Congenital. 
Iniiamm&tiou. 


44 


Sophia Bixler 


Allen county 


4^ 


Susan Elizabeth Garrison „. 

Anna CuUen 


Morgan county 


Congenital. 
Fever. 


4fi 


White county 


47 


Melissa Garrison 


Morgan county 


Congenital. 
Inflammation. 


48 


Leri Sylvester Walton 

Margaret Louisa Fitzpatrick 

Mary Maloney 


Martin county 


49 
fiO 


Delaware county 

Wayne county 


Cataract. 
Unknown. 


51 


Jane Smith 


Hendricks county 

Lawrence county 

Johnson county 


Fever. 


f)1^ 


Juliet Bryant 


Inllamm&tiou. 


fiS 


Hester Marshal 


Inflammation. 


54 


Milton S. Holman 


Delaware county 

Kosciusko county 

Grant county 


Typhoid Fever. 

Congenital. 

Congenital, 

Congenital. 

Fever. 


fir> 


John Richhart , 


5r. 


Joseph Shores 


57 


Cynthia Talbee 


Boone county 


58 


Margaret Alexander 


Hendricks county 

Clark county 


59 
fiO 


Benjamin F. Tooms 


Congenital. 
Congenital. 
Fever. 


Lavina Talbee 


Boone county 


r.i 


Stephen Feeny 


Marion county 


fi? 


George Read 


Putnam county 


Accident. 


fis 


Phebe Garrison 


Morcfan count.v 


Congenital 







SECRETARY'S R E T K T 



The receipts and expenditures for the Institute for the Educa- 
tion of the Blind from the 1st day of ISTovember, 1856, to the 
31st day of October, 1857, inchisive, were as follows : 

Warrants drawn 07i Treasurer. 



Date of 


No- 


Wiirrant. 


1856. 




Nov. }2, 


864 


Nov. 12, 


865 


Nov 12, 


866 


Nov. 12, 


867 


Nov. 12, 


868 


Nov. 12, 


869 


Nov. 12, 


870 


Nov. 12 


871 


Nov. ]2, 


872 


Nov. 12, 


873 


Nov. 12, 


874 


Nov. 12, 


875 


Nov. 12, 


87ii 


Nov. 12, 


877 


Nov. 12, 


'878 


Nov. 12, 


879 


Nov. 12, 


880 


Nov. 12, 


881 


Nov. 12, 


882 


Nov. 12, 


883 


Nov. 12, 


884 


Nov. 12, 


885 


1857. 




Jan. 14, 


886 


Jan. 14, 


887 


Jan. 14, 


888 


Jan. 14, 


889 


Jan. 14, 


890 


Jan. 14, 


891 


Jan. 14, 


802 


Jan. 14, 


893 


Jan. 14, 


894 


Jan. 14, 


895 


Jan. 14, 


896 


Jan. 14. 


897 


Jan. 14, 


898 


Jan. 14. 


899 


Jan. 14, 


900 


Jan. 14, 


901 


Jan. 14, 


9^2 


Jan. 14, 


903 


Jan. 14, 


5)04 


Jan. 14, 


905 


Jan. 14, 


906 



To whom issued and on what Account. 



W. C. Larrahee, expenses of work department. 

W. C . Larrahee, current expenses 

W. C . LaiTabee, miscellaneous expenses 

Root & Chaml)ers, for repairs on verandas . .. 

E . Danforth, fi)r broom corn •. 

Peter Smith, Ijroom corn 

L. S. Newell, hill of sheet music 

Ind. Coal Co., for coal 

Wright, Bates & Maguire for groceries 

Pa. Inst, for Blind, for work material 

H. Tilly & Co., for soap 

W. L. Ramsey, for plumbing 

S. McGiffiin, expenses of work depai'tment . .. 

E . Drumbar, repairs 

I. Davis &. Co., repairs 

Althea A. Paxton, services as teacher 

Brazil Coal Co., for coal 

John S. Tarkington, for notarial services 

E. W. H. Ellis, services as Secretary 

J. H. Cook, trustee 

James G. Read, trustee 

W. B. McCulloch, trustee 



W. C . Larrahee, current expenses 

W. C. Larrahee, expenses of work department . . .. 

W . C . LaiTabee, miscellaneous expenses 

W. C . Larrabee, expenses of work department . . • . 

W. C . Larrabee, current expenses 

S. McMillen, bill of groceries 

Robert'Traub, hay 

S. McGiffin, broom corn 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas for Oct., Nov., and Dec. 

H. Cooper, work material 

Adams Express Co ., work material 

W. L. Ramsey, repairs 

Carey & Co , work material 

A. B. Willard, pupils' clothing 

A. B. Willard, work material 

Ind. & Cin. R. R. Co., freight bill 

Thomas Reynor, sawing wood 

Aaron Boyer, broom handles 

Middleton & Co ., engravings for report 

Jacob Lindley , crockery 

J . R. Griffith, furuituie 





$102 71 


168 55 


14 75 


365 75 


320 00 


700 oe 


h) 87 


13 50 


15 85 


244 00 


53 29 


8 S5 


13 40 


4 00 


5 35 


42 00 


30 00 


20 00 


75 00 


4 GO 


63 46 


12 80 


286 56 


153 60 


23 26 


149 18 


333 38 


454 95 


15 00 


79 8» 


139 50 


27 50 


48 50 


116 30 


290 40 


9 59 


37 50 


45 04 


95 50 


56 00 


25 00 


36 45 


7 M 



24 



Warrmits drawn on Treasurer. — Continued. 




1857. 
Jan. 14, 
Jail. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
J:ui. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jm. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jaii. 14. 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 14, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 1-2, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Fci). 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 1-2, 
Feb. 12. 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. lii, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
»eb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Fell. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 



907 

908 

9119 

910 

911 

912 

913 

914 

915 

916 

917 

918 

919 

920 

921 

922 

923 

924 

5125 

920 

927 

928 

929 

930 

931 

932 

933 

934 

93d 

930 

937 

938 

939 

94U 

941 

942 

1(43 

<H4 

94J 

940 

947 

94« 

949 

950 

951 

952 

953 

954 

955 

950 

957 

958 

959 

%0 

901 

902 

903 

»G1 

UG5 

OUU 

907 

9G8 

969 

970 

971 

972 

973 

974 

975 

9:0 

977 

978 



W. Phelps, broom corn 

W. W. Wick, postage 

W. II. Turner, for wood 

James White, for wood 

S . W . Drew, repairs 

I. P. &C. U. R. Co., freight 

J. Ileinhart, repairs 

W. Sheets, rent of Masonic Hall 

J . H . Ross, coal 

Kirlin & Fitzgibbon, groceries 

Severin & Co., fodder 

Ind. Cent. R. R. Co. freiglit 

O. F. McGinnis, pupils' clothing 

Andrew Fisher, repairs 

J . F. Clere & Co., work material 

G. W.Pitts, ice bill , 

C . Zimmerman, repairs 

James Sulgrove, repairs 

U.iitli & T.ii'P, w,iijd 

J . li. Crawford, pupils' clothing 

llaiinaman & Duzan, materials for repairs 

Thompson & Woodburu, medical bill 

L. S. Newell, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 

CM. Walker, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 

S. McGiffin, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 . . 

M. E. Dunn, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 

E . W. Bowman, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 

Margaret Belches, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 

Ann A. Paxton, salary to Jan. 1, 1857 

W. B. McCullough, trustee 

J. 6. Read, trustee 

P. McNaught, pupils' clothing 

W . C , Larrabee, current expenses 

W. C. Larrabee, expenses of work department. 

W . C . Lan-abee, miscellaneous expenses 

Tousey & Byrani, work material 

Tousey & Byram, house furnishing 

Tousey Sc. Byram, pupils' clothing 

J. M. Talbott, pupils' clothing 

P. McNaught, pupils' clothing 

J. K. Wheelan, pupils' clothing 

J . K. Wheelan, work material 

ln<l. Coal Co., coal 

W . C . Larrabee, pupils' clothing 

R. Browning, medicine 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas for January 

Stewart & Bowen, stationery 

Slate rteuliiicl Co., for printing 

Bauer & Goepper, pupils' clothing 

James White, wood 

C. A. Nelson, labor in work department 

A. Cutting, lal)or in work department 

Lyttle Hall, repairs 

Wright, Bates, & Maguire, groceries 

McMillen & Gardner, groceries 

MiUh, Alford & Co., groceries 

K. L. &. A. W. McOuat, stoves and hardware . . . 

H . J . Horn, furnishing goods 

Indianapolis & Cincinnati R. R. Co., freight . .. 

Peter Smith, broom corn 

M. Hyland, rejiairs 

W. W. Roberts, medicines 

Adams Exjiress Co., freight 

H. S. K'dlogg, furniture 

J . K. Ramsay, furniture 

H. Tilly &. Co., bill of soap 

.M. Wolf, pupils' clothing 

Browning &. Meyer, work material 

J.. A. Vinnedge, pupils' clothing 

Alex. Melzciin, jiro visions 

Severn Sc ('n., feed 

W. L. Ramsay, repairs 



S19 80 

10 11 

322 50 

21 00 

35 05 

7 93 

7 55 

20 00 

6 75 
50 77 

18 00 
3 40 

1 75 
10 70 
30 25 

13 15 
5 00 

7 75 
301) 00 

2 70 

14 il 
25 00 

175 00 
100 00 
87 50 
75 00 
50 00 
25 00 
25 00 
12 80 
24 90 
93 90 
329 18 
156 15 
39 50 

19 10 
124 80 

140 27 
2 30 

10 50 
22 05 

6 38 
108 00 

141 70 
45 50 
68 03 
37 77 

8 50 
128 GO 

21 00 
30 00 
78 00 

2 (;o 

344 17 
92 13 
727 75 
134 40 
HO 44 

9 75 
1.52 61 

9 00 

7 »2 
13 45 
26 22 

00 

20 07 
116 70 

6 72 
9 50 
4 25 

1 25 
140 20 



26 



Warrants drawn on Treasurer. — Continued. 



Date of 
Warrant. 



1857. 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb. 12, 
Feb, 12, 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
JIarch 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
March 25 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 1>, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
April 15, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
May 13, 
June 10, 
June 10, 
June 10, 
June 10, 
June 10, 
June 10, 
June 10, 



3 
4 
5 
6 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 



To whom issued and on what Account. 



James McWorkman, current exjienses 

J. H. Cook, trustee 

N. B. Palmer, trustee 

J. G. Read, trustee 

John F. Carr, trustee 

K. W. H. Ellis, trustee 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department. . 

James McWorkman, repairs 

James McWorkman, fuel 

James McWorkman, stationery 

James McWorkman, pupils' clothing 

Mills, Alford & Co., groceries 

A. Knodle, pupils' clothing 

M . Wolf, pupils' clothing 

Gulick & Tweed, beef Ijills 

Indianapolis Gas Company, gas for February 

P. McNauu'lit & Oi.., pui>ils' clutUing 

Tousey &. Byram, pupils' clothing 

Tousey & Byram, furnishing goods 

Tousey & Bjram, work material 

J. II. Cook, trustee 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department. . 

James McWorkman, repairs 

James McWorkman, fuel 

James McWorkman, pupils' clothing 

James McWorkman, stationery 

Lewis Nicolai, meat bill 

R. L. & A. W. McOuat. stove 

A. Knodle, pupils' clothing 

Indianapolis Gas Company, gas for March 

F. McCaskee, repairs 

John Burke, coal 

Root & Drake, castings 

P. McNaught, pupils' clothing 

Gulick & Tweed, meat bill 

Willard & Stowell, sheet music 

Scott & McLaughlin, groceries 

Mills, Alford & Co., groceries 

John H. Cook, trustee 

James McWorkman, sinking fund loan 

L. S. Newell, salary to April 1, 1857 

C. M. Walker, salary to .\pril 1, 1857 

S. McGiffin, salary to April 1, 1857 

M. E. Dunn, salary to April 1, 1857 

E. W. Bowman, salary to April 1, 1857 

Margaret Belches, salary to April 1, 1857 

Ann A. Paxton, salary to April 1, 1857 

L. Duniap, salary to April 1, 1857 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department.. 

James McWorkman, fuel 

James McWorkman, pupils' clothing 

.lames McWorkman, stationery 

Mills, Alford & Co., groceries 

H. Tilly & Co., soap bill 

Lafayette and Indianapolis Railroad Company, wood 

Indianapolis Gas Company, gas for April 

L. Nicolai, meat bill 

John H. Cook, trustee 

John F. Carr, trustee 

J. G. Read, trustee 

E. W. II. Ellis, trustee , 

James McWorkman, sinlving fund loan 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWcjrkman, pupils' clothing 

James McWorkman, fuel 

James McWorkman, stationery 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department 

James McWorkman, repau-s 

J. U. Cook, trustee 



Amount. 


$500 00 


12 76 


20 00 


18 96 


14 20 


6 00 


446 96 


71 67 


26 33 


19 85 


9 88 


75 


288 47 


15 25 


39 25 


39 12 


63 3S 


15 65 


13 54 


18 57 


3 75 


12 68 


318 02 


79 59 


6 .50 


27 00 


1 73 


9 10 


55 57 


18 30 


4 20 


39 00 


6 18 


11 25 


6 30 


17 15 


29 08 


5 75 


16 90 


286 56 


12 88 


1,000 00 


175 00 


100 00 


87 50 


87 50 


50 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


333 81 


42 38 


22 50 


59 82 


6 00 


364 95 


57 30 


137 50 


28 88 


127 32 


30 88 


104 80 


156 80 


64 00 


2,500 00 


701 58 


92 65 


13 25 


5 00 


19 30 


7 00 


12 88 



26 



Wairants draimi on Tt^easurer. — Continued. 



Date of 
Warrant. 



1857. 
Jane 10, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
Jnly 15. 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
July 15, 
August 11, 
August 11, 
August 11, 
August 11, 
August 11, 
August 11, 
Sept. 16. 
Sept. 16, 
Sept. 16, 
Sept. 16, 
Sept. 16, 
Sept. 16, 
Sept. 16, 
Oct. 8, 
Oct. 8, 
Oct. 8, 
Oct.^8, 
Oct. 8, 
Oct. 8, 
Oct. 8, 
Oct. 8, 



73 

74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
8-3 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 

im 

109 
110 
111 



To whom issued and on what Account. 



James McWorkman, sinking fund loan 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, pupils' clothing , 

James McWorkman, stationery 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department. 

James McWorkman, repairs 

J. H. Cook, trustee 

L. S. Newell, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 

C. M. Walker, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 

S. McGiffin, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 

M. E. Dunn, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 , 

E. W. Bowman, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 , 

M. Belches, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 

A. A. Paxton, salary to Oct. 1 . 1857 

L. Dunlap, salary to Oct. 1, 1857 

N. B. Palmer, trustee 

E. W. H. Ellis, trustee 

James McWorkman, sinking fund loan 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department 

James McWorkman, pupils' clothing 

James McWorkman, repairs 

James McWorkman, stationery 

J. H. Cook, trustee 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, fuel 

James McWorkman, expenses of work department 

James McWorkman, stationery 

James McWorkman, repairs 

Kirland &. Fitzgibbon, groceries 

John 11. Cook, trustee 

James McWorkman, current expenses 

James McWorkman, purchase of carriage 

James McWorkman, purchase of horse 

James McWorkman. stationery 

James McWorkman, pupils' clothing 

E. W. H. Ellis, trustee 

J. H. Cook, trustee 

Mills, Alford & Co., groceries 

Total 



Amount. 



«i,ooe 90 


799 22 


161 69 


22 40 


44 63 


35 77 


12 88 


350 00 


200 00 


175 00 


175 00 


100 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


38 00 


24 00 


1,500 00 


609 22 


206 13 


54 60 


103 14 


3 00 


12 88 


178 32 


29 00 


11 30 


2 60 


1 50 


37 90 


12 88 


154 90 


200 00 


200 00 


23 00 


3 40 


48 50 


16 88 


48 76 



$15,878 23 



27 

Receipts by Treasurer. 



Date of 
Receipt. 



1856. 
Nov, 11, 
Not. 11, 

1857. 
Feb. 11, 
Feb. 11. 
August 29, 
Angust 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
Oct. 19, 



No. 



94 
95 

96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 



From whom received. 



W. C. Larraliee, work department... 
W. C. Larrabee, pupils' clothing .. . . 

W. C. Larrabee, pupils' clothing 

W. C. Larraoee, work department. . .. 
James McWorkman, work department 
James McWorkman, pupils' clothing. 
James McWorkman, miscellaneous .• 
James McWorkman, work department 
County Treasurers, pupils' clothing. . 

Total 



$344 58 
36 65 

116 51 

284 87 

1,511 28 

36 52 

20 00 

89 15 

983 22 



$3,412 78 



28 



KECAPITIJLATION. 

Receipts from November 1, 1856, to February 1, 1857, being the 

dose of term of W. C. Larrabee, Superintended. 

Balance in treasury ]S^ovember 1, 1856.... $8,858 52 

From work department 629 45 

From pupils' clothinfif 143 16 

$9,631 18 

Expenditures for same period. 

For work department $2,690 80 

For miscellaneous expenses 219 86 

For current expenses 3,012 55 

For construction and repairs 743 91 

For printing and stationery 46 27 

For officers and salaries 772 52 

For fuel and lights 1,126 38 

For pupils' clothing 685 56 

For furniture account 421 81 

$9,719 66 

Receipts from commencement of term of James 3Ic Workman, Super- 
intendent, February 1, 1857, to October 31, 1857. 

From work department $1,600 43 

From pupils' clothing 36 52 

From miscollaneous sources 20 00 

From advance from counties for pupils' 

clothing 983 22 

$2,640 17 

Expenditures for same period. 

For current expenses $5,453 96 

For work department 478 80 

For construction and repairs 192 72 

For officers and salaries 2,357 86 

For printing and stationery 80 98 

For fuel and lights 391 61 



29 

For pupils' clothing 479 68 

For furniture account 36 87 

For miscellaneous account 405 75 

For sinking fund loan 6,000 00 

$15,878 23 

GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 

Receipts. 

Balance in treasury November 1, 1856 $8,858 52 

Receipts in W. C. Larrabee's term 772 61 

Receipts in J. Mc Workman's term 2,640 17 

Total $12,271 30 

Expenditures. 

Expended in W. C. Larrabee's term $9,719 66 

Expended in J. McWorkman's term 15,878 23 



Total $25,597 89 

Showing an excess of expenditures of. $13,326 59 

Adding to the foregoing excessthe sum of $1,349 37, being 
the balance of appropriation for the new heating apparatus, and 
the total excess of expenditures for the support of the Institute, 
over the receipts and appropriations, is the sum of $14,675 96. 

Included in the sum total of expenditures during the term of 
Superintendent McWorkman, is the item of $6,000 for sinking 
fund loan. Deducting this and we are enabled to present the 
following comparative statement : 

Expenses of first 4 months of the year $9,719 QQ 

Expenses of last 8 months of the year 9,878 23 

Total for the whole year $19,597 89 

It is proper, however, to state that a considerable portion, 
perhaps $2,000, of the warrants drawn during the term of Prof. 
Larrabee, were on account of expenditures during the preceding 



30 ^ 

year, and that the allowances for expenses of October are yet to 
be made. 

In rendering the account, the sura of $1,362 23, in controversy 
between the Institute and Elijah Newland, Esq., is still regarded 
ae being in the treasury and belonging to the Institute. 
Respectfully submitted. 

E. W. H. ELLIS, Secretary. 
Indianapolis, October 31, 1857. 



; .u.' •'!'■(''! 



■ >■.:< .},!, 



p 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Office of Treasurer of State, \ 
Indianapolis, November 1, 1857. J 

To the Board of Commissioners of the 

Indiana Institute for the Blind: 

Gentlemen: — There has been received into the treasury on 
account of said Institute for the fiscal year ending October 31, 
1857, $3,627 58. 

And disbursed upon the same for the same period, $19,954 51. 

Yours, 

AQUILLA JONES, 

Treasurer of State. 



■^-.-..-.uvn' 



BY-LAWS 



OF THE 



INDIANA INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATING THE BLIND. 

ADOPTED JAJS'CTARY 9, 1856.. 



-OP THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



1. The Board of Trustees shall hold monthly meetings at 
the Institute, on Wednesday after the second Monday in every 
month, and four members shall constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

2. Special meetings of the Board may be called by the Sec- 
retary upon the suggestion of the Superintendent, or upon the 
requisition of two members, or if in his own opinion the in- 
terests of the Institute require such meeting. 

II. — OF THE PRESIDENT. 

1. The Board at their meeting in April annually shall elect 
one of their number as President, who shall preside over the 
deliberations of each meeting, and shall be entitled to vote upon 
all questions before the Board. 

III. — OF THE TREASURER, 

1. The Treasurer shall, in addition to the duties prescribed 
by law, furnish the Board an annual statement of his receipts 
and disbursements, in detail ; a summary of which shall be 
appended to the annual report of the Board. 
2 D. J.— 3. 



34 

IV. OF THE SECRETARY. 

1. The Board at tlieir meeting in April, annually, shall elect 
one of their number as Secretary. He shall carry on the neces- 
sary correspondence of the Board, keep full minutes of the 
proceedings of each meeting, and furnish, when necessary, 
attested copies of the same to those whom they concern, and 
shall issue all notices of meetings of the Board. 

2. He shall keep all accounts between the Board and the 
Treasurer, and shall draw all warrants upon the Treasurer for 
appropriations and allowances by the Board, and shall furnish 
the Board, in detail, a statement of the accounts of the Insti- 
tute, to accompany their annual report. 

Y. OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

1. The Superintendent shall be chosen biennially by the 
Board, at their regular meeting in July, and his term of service 
shall commence on the first day of October succeeding his 
election. 

2. He shall be the executive head of the Institute, and the 
medium of communication between it and the Board of Trus- 
tees. He shall be responsible to the Board for the faithful 
performance of all the duties assigned the subordinate officers, 
as well as for the advancement and good behavior of the pupils. 

3. He shall refer to the Board of Trustees all applications 
for admission us pupils from those who do not come within the 
regulations, but in all other cases may admit the applicant with- 
out such reference. He shall keep a record of all those received 
into the Institute, embracing their names and ages, the causes 
and degrees of their blindness, the dates of their admission and 
discharge^ the Post Office address of their parents or guardians, 
and such other information concerning them as may be deemed 
important. 

4. In the school department he shall prescribe the course 
and methods of instruction, the time to be devoted by teachers 
and pupils to the several branches of study, the apparatus and 
text-books to be employed, the system of disci})line, and other 
matters pertaining to the mental and moral improvement of the 
pupils. And it shall be his dutv to make frequent visits to the 



85 

several class-rooms during the hours of instruction, for the pur- 
pose of keeping himself informed as to the progress and deport- 
ment of the pupils, and of making such suggestions to the 
teachers as he may deem useful. He shall devote at least two 
hours per day to the instruction, and attendance upon recitations 
of the several classes in the Institute, if his time can be reason- 
ably spared from other necessary duties. 

5. In the work department he shall prescribe the kinds of 
work to be learned by the pupils, and the number of hours per 
day to be devoted to it, fix the rate of compensation for labor 
performed and instruction given by graduates, or others em- 
ployed as journeymen or assistants, as well as for the overwork 
of the pupils, and direct the manner in which the general busi- 
ness of the department shall be transacted. He shall be required 
to pass frequently through the several shops and work-roomft, 
for the purpose of keeping himself informed of the progress 
and deportment of the pupils, and of making such suggestions 
to the master mechanic and others employed as he may deem 
useful. 

6. He shall provide the necessary apparatus for the work- 
shops, purchase the work material, settle for all over work, keep 
a strict account of all moneys received for sales of stock, and 
pay the same over to the Treasurer, taking his receipt therefor. 
He shall report the transactions of the work department to the 
Board at each monthly meeting, with his vouchers for moneys 
paid into the Treasury, or expended on account of said depart- 
ment. 

7. In the household department he shall prescribe the num- 
ber of domestics and other assistants of a like character to be 
employed, fix the rates of their compensation, and shall exhibit 
in each monthly account a statement of the number, occupation 
and wages of persons so employed. 

8. He shall see that all of the pupils are comfortably and 
respectably clad, and when their friends, through inability or 
neglect, fail to provide them with the necessary clothing, he 
shall supply the same, and lay the accounts therefor before the 
Board for allowance. He shall collect, as far as practicable, 
from the friends of the pupils or from the commissioners of the 
several counties in which they respectively reside, all sums, so 



36 

laid out, and shall pay all moneys so collected to the Treasurer, 
taking his receipt therefor. 

9. All other minor expenses, whether of the household or 
school department, shall be defrayed by the Superintendent, and 
the bills and accounts for the same, certified by him shall be laid 
before the Board for their examination and allowance. 

10. AVhenever furniture, apparatus, work material or the 
like, to any considerable amount, shall in his judgment be 
needed, the Superintendent shall so inform the Trustees, and it 
they shall consent to the expenditure, he shall purchase the 
requisite articles upon the best practical terms, and shall certify 
to the correctness of all accounts before presenting them to the 

card for allowance. 

11. He shall have care of all the buildings and grounds o'- 
the Institute, and shall see that they be kept constantly in order, 
both as to cleanliness and minor repairs. 

12. He shall exercise due care in the promotion of the health 
of the pupils, by requiring of them frequent and thorough ablu- 
tions, exercise in the open air, and entire abstinence from all 
injurious practices, and by providing them with plain substantial 
diet, together with comfortable dormitory accommodations, and 
in all cases of sickness, shall see that they have prompt medical 
treatment, as well as every other necessary attention. 

13. He shall use his utmost endeavors to imbue the minds 
of his pupils with the strictest principles of morality, and to 
induce them to avoid all unbecoming personal habits, requiring 
them to attend regularly upon public worship, at such place as 
may be severally chosen by themselves or their friends. 

14. While he is enjoined to pay particular attention to the 
religious instruction of the pupils, he shall studiously avoid and 
prevent the inculcation of sectarian views, and the same care 
shall also be observed in regard to partizan politics. 

15. He shall see that due respect always be had to the appro- 
priate observance of the Sabbath, by all persons connected with 
the establishment, neither permitting visiting on that day at the 
Institute, nor allowing the pupils to make visits out of the 
house, or engage in improper occuxjations or amusements. 

16. It shall be considered by him an essential feature in the 
mauagement of the Institute, to prevent all unnecessary inter- 



I 37 

course between the male and female pupils, and lie shall there- 
fore see that they are never together, excepting in the class 
rooms during the hours of instruction, or in the presence of 
Bome officer of the Institute. 

17. He shall make an annual report to the Trustees, em- 
bracing an account of the condition and progress of the several 
departments of the institute, of the course of instruction pur- 
sued, and of the health and general improvement of the pupils, 
with suggestions for the advancement of the objects of the 
Institute. 

18. In order that all the officers and other persons engaged 
in the Institute may have a clear understanding of their relative 
duties and obligations, the Superintendent shall be required to 
draft a set of regulations defining their respective duties, a copy 
of which, being approved by the Trustees, shall be furnished to 
each, and for every essential change in the said regulations the 
approval of the Trustees shall be necessary. 

YI. OF THE SUBORDINATE OFFICERS. 

I 

1. The instructors in the several departments, the Matron, 
and all other subordinate officers employed in the Institute, 
shall be appointed annually b}" the Board, at their July meet- 
ing, their term of service to commence on the first of October 
following such appointment. 

2. They shall labor assiduously in their respective capacities 
to promote the object of the Institute, and shall so far as is 
practicable, co-operate with the Superintendent in its general 
management. 

8. Their particular duties shall be prescribed by the Super- 
intendent, in accordance with section eighteenth, of article fifth 
of these by-laws. *. 

YII. — OF TUE ATTENDING PHYSICIAN. 

1, The attending physician shall be appointed annually by 
the Board at their July meeting, his term of service to com- 
mence on the first of October following his appointment. 

2. lie shall visit the Institute, upon the call of the Superin- 
tendent, and at such other times aa he may think necessary or 



38 

proper, and shall render such medical and surgical services, ex- 
cept in capital operations, as shall be necessary for the pupils of 
the Institute, and, if the proper medicines are in the Institute, 
shall prepare the same f. r administration. 

2. His compensation shall be fixed and paid by the Board of 
Trustees, and no charge shall be made to any pupil for medicine 
or medical attendance by the regular physician. The Superin- 
tendent shall have discretionary power to employ the a.d of a 
consulting physician, but such consulting physician shall in no 
case supersede the regular one. 

VIII. OF THE INSTITUTE SESSION. 

1. There shall be one session of the Institute in each year; 
commencing on the first Monday of October, and closing on the 
last Wednesday of July following, leaving a vacation of nearly 
ten weeks, and it shall be considered obligatory upon all of the 
pupils to spend the period of vacation at their respective homes. 

IX. OF THE ADMISSION AND DISCHARGE OF PUPILS. 

1. All blind persons residing in the State of Indiana, who 
are between the ages of eight and twenty-one years, and who 
are not incapacitated by mental or bodily weakness for useful 
instruction, shall be considered eligible for admission as pupils 
of the Institute, but exceptions ma}^ be made in favor of cases 
which do not come within the age specified, but in every such 
case special action of the Board shall be required. 

2. Pupils from the State of Indiana shall in ail cases receive 
their boarding and tuition free of charge, but their clothing and 
other necessary expenses must be furnished or defrayed by their 
friends, or by appropriation of the Commissioners of the counties 
in which they severally reside. 

3. Applicants from other States of suitable age and capacity 
may also be received as pupils, provided they shall in no case 
take precedence over those from Indiana, on payment of such 
rates of compensation for boarding and tuition as the Board in 
each case shall determine. 

4. No applicant shall be received into the Institute, until the 
rules established by the J3oard for the admission of pupils shall 
have been complied with. 



39 

5. All of the regular pupils shall be required to be in at- 
tendance at the Institute, at the commencement of each session, 
and to remain until its close, unless prevented by sickness or 
other e5tigency; and in case of the failure of any pupil to com- 
ply with this requirement, without a sufficient reason, the right 
of such delinquent pupil to the privileges of the Institute shall 
be forfeited. 

6. Pupils may be expelled for misconduct when they shall 
be adjudged by the Superintendent to be incorrigible, but for 
each act of expulsion the approval of the Board of Trustees shall 
be necessary. No pupil of mature years shall be expelled with- 
out an opportunity of vindicating himself from the charges pre- 
ferred against him. 

7. There being no limit fixed by law for the time during 
which a pupil may remain in the Institute, it shall be left to the 
Superintendent to determine in each individual case as to the 
proper time for dismissal, but he shall in no case discharge a 
pupil without the consent of the Board of Trustees. 

8. Pupils who complete their course of instruction with credit 
to themselves, shall be furnished with a diploma by the Superin- 
tendent, signed by himself, and countersigned by the President 
and Secretary of the Board. 

9. No pupil shall be graduated without the written recom- 
mendation of his or her respective teachers in Jhe literary or 
work department, or both, as the case may be, addressed to the 
Superintendent, and filed among the papers of the Institute. 



Doc. Fo. 2.] PMili 

FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF TEE 



TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENT 



OF THE 



INDIANA INSTITUTION 



FOR 




athfl tljc Ifaf anir 



c^ 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOSEPH J. BINGHAM, STATE PRINTER. 

1857. 
2D. J.— 4. 



■ 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 



A. M. 

Rise 

Recreation 

Breal^fast 

Labor 

Recreation 

Prayers 

Recitations 

P. M. 

Dinner 

Recitations 

Prayers 

Labor 

Supper 

Recreation 

Study 

Retire 



SPRING. 


SUMMER. 


FALL. 


WINTER. 


HOURS. 


HODRS. 


HOURS. 


HOURS. 


at 5 


at45i 


at5>^ 


ate 


from 5yi to 6)4 


from 5 >4' to 6 


from 6 to 6}i 


from 6>^ to lyi 


at Q>}i 


ate 


at OX 


at7M 


from" to 8,1^ 


from 6J2' to 8)2' 


from 7)^ to 8}^ 


from 7)2 to 8>s' 


from 8>a to 9 


from 81^ to 9 


from 8>i to 9 


from 8)2' to 9 


at 9 


at 9 


at 9 


at 9 


from 9X to 12 


from 9I4' to 12 


from 9X to 12 


from ^% to 18 


at 12>;( 


at 12X 


at I2I4' 


at 12}^ 


from 1 to 3 


from 1 to 3 


from 1 to 3 


from 1 to 3 


at 3 


at 3 


at 3 


at 3 


from 3)^ to 6 


from 3)^ to 6>^ 


from 3)^ to 5 J^ 


from 3,'4 to 5 


at 61^ 


at 6^4' 


ate 


at 5I4 


from 6>4 to 7)^ 


from 7 to 7^2 


from 6>i to 7 


from 51^ to6>^ 


from 7 14 to 8^ 


from 7>^ to 8^ 


from 7 to 8^ 


from \j^i to »X 


at 9 


at 9 


at 9 


at 9 



Divine worsliip in the Chapel on Sabbath at Sj^ o'clock, A. M., and ati2, P. M. No exercises on Satur- 
day afternoon. Supper j^ hour earlier on Saturday and Sunday. 

Visitors are admitted on each day of the week, except Sun- 
day, between the hours of nine and twelve, A. M., and at no 
other time. During these hours, an attendant will be in readi- 
ness to conduct visitors through those parts of the buildings 
open to the public, and to the school rooms. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEED. 



Hon. J. P. DRAKE, 
Rev. LOYE H. JAMESOI^, 
JOHN S. SPANN, Esq., 
JULIUS NICOLAI, Esq., 
L. B. STOCKTON, Esq., 
JOHN W. KIGHTLEY, Esq. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 



PRESIDENT, 

Hon. J. P. DRAKE. 

SECRETARY, 

JOHN S. SPANN, Esq. 

TREASURER, CX-officio, 

Hon. AQUILLA JONES. 



INTELLECTUAL DEPARTMENT. 



SUPERINTENDENT, 

THOMAS MAC ENTIRE, A. M. 



INSTRUCTORS, 

WILLIAM WILLARD, 
H. S. GILLETT, A. M. 
W. H. LATHAM, A. M., M. D 
W. H. DE MOTTE, A. M. 



PHILIP A. EMERY, A. M. 
CORNELIA TRASK, 
ANiSrA B. VERY, 
B. R. NORDYKE. 



DOMESTIC DEPAl^TMENT. 



PHYSICIAN, 

LIVINGSTOISr DUNLAP, M. D. 

MATRON, 

Miss LXJCHSTDA L. GILLETT. 

STEWARD, 

WILLIAM R. HOGSHIRE. 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 



W. R. JIOGSIURY., Manar/cr of the Farm. 
JAMES .DAVIS, Master of Shoe ShojJ. 
Miss JULIA A. TAYLOR, Teacher of Needlework. 
GEORGE McCLALN", Gardener. 



'>' 



TRUSTEES^ REPORT. 



The Trustees of the Institution for the Education of the 
Deaf and Dumb, in accordance with " an act to provide for the 
government and support of the Institution for the Education of 
the Deaf and Dumb," would respectfully submit to His Excel- 
lency, A. P. Willard, Governor of the State of Indiana, the fol- 
lowing report : 

The Trustees, since their last annual statement, have made the 
following regulations for the government of said Institution. 
They have appointed as Teachers and Officers to fill vacancies 
which have occurred within the last year, with an annual salary, 
as follows : « . 

To William "Will ard, teacher, per annum $1,000 

Horace S. Gillett, teacher, per annum 1,000 

William H. Latham, teacher, per annum 1,000 

Wm. H. Demotte, teacher, per annum 1,000 

P. A. Emery, teacher, per annum .600 

Cornelia Trask, teacher, per annum 300 

Anna B. Very, teacher, per annum 300 

B. R. Nordyke, teacher, per annum 400 

L. Dunlap, physician, per annum 300 

L. L. Gillett, matron, per annum 400 

W. P. Hogshire, steward, per annum 500 

On the subject of repairs, &c., as provided for in the 5th sec- 
tion of said act, we would respectfully refer to the report of the 
Superintendent, herewith submitted, and would at the same time 
remark, that we have duly approved of the matters therein con- 
tained, in relation to the employees and their salaries as set forth 
in his report. 



48 

It will be seen by section seven of said act that many subjects 
are therein set forth upon which the Trustees are required to 
make report, and as the various subjects come within the duties 
assigned the Superintendent, and as that officer has bestowed 
much time in arranging, and very satisfactorily reported thereon 
to this Board, we cordially refer the same to 3'Our Excellency, 
and at the same time make it part of our report, and accordingly 
submit it herewith. 

The Trustees would here remark, that they have made for the 
future government and regulation of the Institution, a rule that 
no pupil over the age of twenty-one years shall be admitted 
hereafter therein. The Trustees, as a reason for making this 
rule would remark that, as the Institution has been in success- 
ful operation for about fourteen years, they presumed that all the 
citizens of Indiana who desired to avail themselves of its benefits 
had done so, and that consequently, those who may hereafter 
apply would be within the limits afiSlxed by this rule. 

In conseCj[uence of the failure of the last legislature to make 
provisions for the payment of the current expenses of the Insti- 
tution, and thereby for the time being, suspending its operations, 
the Trustees made such alterations in the finances, on re-com- 
mencing the same as to them, seemed just and right in the pre- 
mises. We, therefore, have been drawing directly on the Treas- 
urer of State, in favor of the Superintendent for the estimated 
expenses of each month. At the end of which time we make a 
careful examination of the disbursements of the Superintendent 
and approve or disapprove the same as we deem correct, and 
charge him accordingly. 

Since the last annual report of the Trustees, the office of 
President of this Board has been made vacant by the death of 
the lamented Honorable William J. Brown. The Trustees deeply 
regret this melancholy dispensation, and feel that the Institution 
has been deprived of an able and efficient officer, and those con- 
nected therewith of a most excellent counselor in the manage- 
ment of its various duties. 

After the death of lion. W. J. Brown, your Excellency ap- 
pointed John W. Kightley, Esq., to supply the vacancy, who 
took bis seat on this Board on the 2d of April, 1857. 



49 

For the condition of the finances of the Institution we refer 
to the report of the Superintendent. 

In conchision, we desire to speak in the highest commenda- 
tion of the Superintendent, for his untiring efforts in behalf of 
the Institution, and also of the officers and teachers in its em- 
ploy, each of whom has devoted his entire ability to the pro- 
motion and well being of those who are made the recipients of 
the charities of this noble Institution. And we feel that we 
cannot commend too highly the officers of State in taking the 
responsibility to sustain this Benevolent Institution of the State, 
in the absence of legislative enactment to sustain the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES P. DRAKE, 
J. OTCOLAI, 
JOHN" S. SPANN, 
L. H. JAMESON,. 
L. B. STOCKTON, 
JOIIISr W. KIGHTLEY. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees: 

Gentlemen : — To you, I now in accordance with custom and 
tlie requirements of law, respectfully present my annual report, 
containing an account of the principal events connected with 
the transactions of the year just closed, together with some 
statements respecting the present condition and future prospects 
of the Institution. 

It has always heretofore been the happy privilege of those 
having charge of this Institution, annually to record its contin- 
ual advancement in prosperity and usefulness, and from year to 
year to congratulate its friends and patrons upon the uninter- 
rupted and eminent success which has attended all eflbrts for 
the accomplishment of the benevolent ends for which it was 
founded. But such is not our good fortune on the present occa- 
sion. On the contrary, we have to record events the most 
inauspicious and embarrassing, and which mark the past year as 
the first in its career, in which its usefulness has received a 
serious check. 

This Institution was created by an act of the Legislature, and 
is wholly dependent for its support upon appropriations from 
the State Treasury. 

The American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb at Hartford, 
the institution in New York city, and the one in Philadelphia, 
as well as many others of the charitable institutions in the Mid- 
dle and Eastern States, are independent corporations, separate 
from the State, and derive a considerable part of their resources 
from legacies and the contributions of private individuals, and 
do not rely exclusively upon government for their existence and 



52 

support. The State stands in the relation to them simply of a 
patron, and is admitted to their benefits only as individuals are. 
She sends her beneficiaries to them on the same terms that pri- 
vate persons do, and has no more to do in managing their affairs 
than they have. The American Asylum is patronized by all the 
Xew England States. The amount which that institution real- 
ized last year from endowments, was thirty-six thousand eight 
hundred and twenty-one dollars, whilst the whole amount re- 
ceived from State appropriations was only nineteen thousand 
seven hundred and thirty-one dollars. Should the Legislatures 
of all those States at any time fail to make their accustomed 
appropriations, it would not suspend for a day the operations 
of the Asylum. In ]^ew York, year before last, the Legislature 
did actually cut off" all appropriations from the Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb in that State. But the Institution being 
an independent, self-existent, corporate body, the Directors met 
the emergenc}^, raised funds by issuing bonds secured by mort- 
gage, and thus carried it on without any abatement of its use- 
fulness. 

Our Institution is based upon a wholly different foundation. 
It is owned, supported, and controlled entirely by the State. It 
lives, moves, and has its being in the Legislature. The Trustees 
can only receive and disburse the funds put into their hands by 
that body, — they have no right to borrow, — the law expressly 
prohibits them from borrowing funds on account of the Institu- 
tion, in any case. It is true that the Constitution of the State 
requires that the Legislature shall make provision for its sup- 
port ; but when the General Assembly fails to assess the taxes, 
or to make the requisite appropriation of funds the only recourse 
is to suspend operations. When, therefore, our Legislature ad- 
journed last March, without passing a revenue law or making 
any £ii)propriations, suspension was unavoidable. The amount 
appropriated by the previous Legislature to meet the current 
expenses of the first quarter of the session was expended, all the 
bills for supplies purchased during the second quarter were due, 
and there was not a dollar of funds on hand. Without question 
the only course to be })iirsuo(l in the circumstances in which we 
were placed, was to suspend oi)erations, and return the i)Upils to 
their friends and guardians in the counties from which they 



53 

came. We were left without means to support tliem. After 
long and painful deliberation this course was resolved upon. 
Accordingly on the tenth of April the school was suspended, the 
pupils dismissed to their homes, and the Institution closed, until 
such time as means for carrying it on should Ije provided. 

Into the question of the failure of the Legislature to make 
the necessary provision for the support of the Institution, or the 
causes which led to that unfortunate result, it is not necessary, 
Vv^ere it proper, for us to enter, further than to express it as our 
firm conviction, that the failure did not originate in the least in 
any opposition to the Institution, or want of confidence in its 
management, or, indeed, in any lack of interest in it on the part 
of any of the members, as one of the first and most important 
benevolent enterprises of the State. For the proof of this, we 
have only to refer to the highly commendatory report of the 
joint committee of the two houses, appointed to examine into 
the affairs of the Institution; to invite attention to the generous 
liberality of the grants recommended by the committee of Ways 
and Means; and to the fact that the bill as reported passed with- 
out opposition through the House of Representatives and the 
second reading of the Senate. With the contest which sprung 
up in the Senate, the Institution, as a cause, was not in the 
slightest degree involved, nor was its usefulness or the wisdom 
of its management at all impeached, in that unhappy contro- 
versy which consumed the last days of the session. 

After a suspension of nearly six months, including the ordin- 
ary annual vacation, the operations of the Institution were 
resumed on the first of last month. The Treasurer of State, on 
the recommendation of the other State Officers, and being 
moved to it by his own generous sympathies for the unfortunate 
agreed to advance the necessary funds. This was done in th|p 
firm faith that the people of the State would approve of the 
course, and that the next Legislature would supply the omis- 
sions of the last. This proposition was approved and the offer 
of funds gladly accepted by the Board of Trustees. A circular 
letter was immediately issued, inviting the pupils to return to 
their studies. 

Whatever may be thought by others of the resumption of the 
school, we for our part are of the opinion that it is the salvation 



54 

of tlio Institutiou. Had the suspension continued until the 
next regular session of the General Assembly, the enterprise 
would have been wholly prostrated. The classes would have 
been broken up, the pupils scattered, the lessons already learned 
forgotten, their habits of study lost, and many of them, thrown 
upon the world, would have been corrupted, and haA^e passed 
beyond the reach of recovery. The corps of teachers, in the 
formation of which much labor and pains have been spent, would 
have been dissolved, and by engaging elsewhere would have 
been lost to us. A loss that could not, from the present limited 
number of experienced and qualified members of the profession 
in the country, probably have been supplied at all, except by the 
long and tedious process of taking new men and instructing 
them in the knowledge and practice of this most difiicult and 
unique art. In a word the whole organization, the building up 
of which has cost so many years and so much money and labor, 
would have been dissolved, and Deaf-Mute education in Indi- 
ana thrown back where it was ten years ago. We could not 
have recovered from such a calamity, under the most favorable 
auspices, in less than five or six years, if, indeed, we ever could 
have done it. From the dire effects of such a sad disaster, we 
have been happily saved by the timely intervention of the Offi- 
cers of State. The dark cloud which enshrouded in gloom all 
our prospects of usefulness, has been removed, and we are per- 
mitted again to rejoice in dispensing the blessings of education 
to this most unfortunate, but interesting class of persons. 

The effect even of the temporary suspension of the Institu- 
tion has been unfavorable to its interests, in several respects. 

All the paying pupils who were here, have left us and gone to 
other institutions. The parents of a number more, believing 
that the scliool would not be re-organized for several years to 
come, have sold out and emigrated to neighboring States for 
the i»urpose of completing the education of their children. 
Several are known to have left from this cause. Formerly the 
reputation of the Institution was such as to induce many per- 
sons who had Deaf and Dumb children, to move into the State 
to avail themselves of its advantages. The case has been com- 
pletely reversed within the last six months, and now they are 
leaving us for want of confidence in the stability of the Institu- 



55 

tion. A suspension occurring once, may occur again, and we 
have to lament tliat Legislation for this object has been joined 
with other questions so that in their decision the very existence 
of the cause has been jeopardized. The question arises whether 
the support of the Institution ought not to be placed on a more 
sure and independent basis. The change effected in 1852 in our 
financial system, has proved to be an unfortunate one. The 
method adopted and pursued previously to that time, was de- 
cidedly better, and it is hoped that a return to that, or the adop- 
tion of a better one, will hereafter be efi'ected. 

Besides the ill effects of the suspension mentioned above, 
there are others no less to be regretted. The intellectual and 
moral character of the pupils has been from this cause, to some 
extent impaired. A change for the worse is very manifest in a 
number of them since they returned. Nor is this at all strange. 
"With habits of obedience, order, diligence and right deportment 
but partially formed, no long time was necessary to impair the 
good impressions made upon their minds, removed, as many of 
them were, from wholesome restraint, and exposed to tempta- 
tions. And those who had not progressed far enough in their 
studies to derive instruction from books, have forgotten in the 
long vacation, much of what had been taught them. The 
younger pupils have suffered most hj the interruption of their 
studies. It will require considerable time and much patience to 
restore the discipline of the school to what it was, and regain 
that attention, application and knowledge, which has been lost. 
Still we are thankful that the case is no worse, and *shall re- 
double our diligence to recover what is missing, and regain in 
the shortest time possible, the favorable position from which we 
have declined. 

But the most grievous loss to the Institution arising from the 
suspension, is found in the breaking up of the classes of the 
pupils, the interruption of their studies, and the diminution of 
the number in attendance. Last term, up to the close, there 
were under instruction, one hundred and fifty-three. Seven of 
them were paying pupils from other States; all the remainder 
were beneficiaries of Indiana. This session there have been ad- 
mitted of former pupils, only one hundred and five, and eight 
new ones ; a few others are expected yet to enter. The notice 



56 

for the re-opening of the AsyUim was unexpected, and the time 
given for preparation to return, short. Many had made their 
arrangements for the winter. Others could not get their clothing 
ready in time to return this session. The parents of others were 
not able on short notice, to raise money to buy clothing and to 
pay the expense of sending them to the Institution. From these 
and like causes, the education of a large number has for the 
present been postponed. We can not expect, judging from pres- 
ent indications, to have in attendance this session, more than 
one hundred and twenty pupils. In this respect we are thrown 
back to where we were five years ago. Looking at it in a pecu- 
niary point of view, we might be led to rejoice at it, as less 
expense will be incurred ; but wheu we reflect that education is 
more essential to this class of persons than to any other, — that 
it is the design of the Institution to aflibrd this blessing to all 
within the State, — and that those who are now deprived of it 
are generally the poorest and the most needy, every benevolent 
heart must regret the result. 

There is one other adverse result of the suspension, which 
ought not to be passed over, and that is, the unfavorable influ- 
ence it has had upon the mechanical department of the Institu- 
tion. This department is deemed next in importance to that of 
intellectual and moral culture ; it was instituted four years ago ; 
shops were built, tools and stock were purchased, and competent 
workmen were employed; coopering was first introduced, then 
shoe and boot making, and finally tailoring was commenced. 
The shops were all in successful operation when the Institution 
was suspended, and the pupils sent home. The cooper shop had 
on hand about fifty thousand seasoned staves and a lot of hoop- 
poles. These could not be kept from decay and injury by worms ; 
we had either to hire hands and manufacture them into barrels, 
or sell them to the best advantage we could; we chose the latter 
course, and an opportunity ofiJering, the whole stock was dis- 
posed of in the latter part of summer, after all hopes of resum- 
ing operations this year had been abandoned. Therefore, when 
resumption was determined upon, we were not in a condition to 
commence this branch of business again; there was no timber 
on hand, nor any to be had suitable to work. The only way to 
obtain it, was to purchase it green and season it; this could not 



57 

be done in the usual method, much short of a year. Hence, 
this shop has to remain closed for the present. Between fifteen 
and twenty boys had partially learned this trade, and were gen- 
erally anxious to perfect their knowledge of it; this they are 
})rechuled from doing now. Some of them, rather than wait till 
this business could be re-instated, preferred to try shoe making. 
Tailoring, as before intimated, had not more than fairly been 
commenced when operations were stopped; it has not been re- 
sumed this term, for want of a competent foreman. The shoe 
business is the only one of the three trades connected with the 
Institution, which has been preserved unimpaired; the shoe 
shop was carried on successfully through the summer, and when 
tlie boys returned everything was prepared for them to go to 
work. There are at tliis time, thirty pupils engaged in this 
department. 

The above mentioned disadvantages and draw-backs, con- 
nected with the suspension of operations, though serious, are by 
no means considered fatal to the prosperity of the cause; it is 
believed that time and proper effort will remove them all. They 
are indeed slight, compared with what a two year's suspension 
would have produced. We still have an abiding faith in the in- 
trinsic merits of the cause, and a firm confidence in the justice, 
inteliigence and liberality of the people of the State; so that 
whatsoever is lacking in the past will be supplied in the future, 
and that present embarrassments will be followed by a greater 
degree of favor and success, than has ever yet been enjoyed by 
the Institution. We believe that prompt and efficient aid will 
be supplied by the Legislature, so soon as it shall assemble ; not 
only in remedying the evils arising out of the failure of the ap- 
propriation bills, but also in providing against a like recurrence. 

The whole amount of funds, including the balance on hand 
Nov. 1st, 1856, received from all sources by the Institution 
during the year, has been nineteen thousand one hundred and 
seventy-one dollars and thirty-seven cents, and of disbursments 
during the same period, nineteen thousand one hundred and 
sixty-eight dollars and seventy-three cents, leaving unexpended 
at this date, a balance of two dollars and sixty-four cents. 

The funds used have been realized from appropriations of the 
Legislature ; from sales of sundries belonging to the Institution ; 
2 D. J.— 5. 



58 

from the general fund of the State; and from counties for 
clothing advanced to indigent pupils. The balance of appro- 
priations was five thousand two hundred and twenty-seven 
dollars and forty-six cents. The sum received from the general 
fund, on warrants issued under the 21st section of the act passed 
in 1852 for the support of the Asylum, was eight thousand four 
hundred and sixty dollars; and from orders of the Board, two 
thousand five hundred dollars. From sales, and from counties, 
two thousand nine hundred and eighty-three dollars and ninety- 
one cents were realized. The above sums make up the aggre- 
gate amount received and used for all purposes during the year, 
including current expenses, salaries, improvements and repairs. 
The objects in detail upon which the funds drawn from the 
Treasury have been spent, will be shown in the following classi- 
fied statement, which, in accordance with law, is inserted as a 
part of this report: 



A detailed statement of receipts and disbursement'- for the year 
ending October oist, 1857. 

RECEIPTS. • 

Balance on hand Nov. 1, 1856 $547 95 

From warrants on State Treasury 16,182 02 

From shoe shop 939 66 

From cooper shop 708 63 

From paying pupils 100 00 

From sale of stock hogs 150 75 

From sale of dry cow 24 00 

From exchange of horses 15 00 

From sale of fire wood 194 53 

From sale of plants 33 75 

From sale of vegetables 22 10 

From clothing advanced to pupils 89 00 

From rent 18 75 

Prom orders on Treasury 2,500 00 

Amounting to $21,476 14 



59 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

1. — On accoimt of Salaries and Wages. 

For salaries of superintendent, steward, 

physician, matron and housekeeper... $2,575 00 

For salaries of eight teachers 5,285 00 

For salary of Secretary of the Board... 50 00 

For per diem and mileage of Trustees. . 176 65 

For wages of domestics 1,680 00 

For wages of laborers 417 75 

Amomiting to $10,184 40 

2. — On account of Provisions and Groceries. 

For flour, 25 barrels $143 52 

For beef, fresh, 15,299^ lbs 750 31 

For beef, dried, 36 Has 5 00 

For veal, 33 lbs '. 2 01 

For pork, 1,355 lbs 99 80 

For bacon hams, 794 lbs 96 16 

For chickens, 43 doz 65 02 

For turkeys, 37 20 90 

For eggs, 745J doz 93 09 

For butter, 1,691 lbs 379 06 

For cheese, 102 lbs 12 32 

For lard, 701| lbs 89 07 

For apples, dried, 2 bushels 3 50 

For apples, green, 23 bushels 23 00 

For peaches, dried, 1 bushel 3 75 

For peaches, green, 4 bushels 5 40 

For prunes, 177 lbs 26 55 

For pickles, 2 cans 1 90 

For crackers, 209 lbs 12 51 " ' 

For salt, 8 sacks 2 00 

For salt, 1 barrel 2 25 

For coffee, 500 lbs 60 00 ' 

For sugar, brown, 1,400 lbs 140 00 ! 

For sugar, refined, 443 lbs 57 38. • 



60 

For molasses, 35 gallons $20 12 

For potatoes, 44 bushels 34 50 

For caudles, 65 lbs 18 18 

For benzole, 180 gallons 261 68 

For soap, hard, 900 lbs 64 70 

For soap, soft, 23 barrels 92 00 

For Starch, 38 lbs.... 3 67 

For indigo, 5 lbs 6 00 

For hops, 25 lbs 12 50 

For malt 3 60 

For pepper, 2 lbs 40 

For cream of tartar, 2 lbs 1 00 

For extract of lemon 15 

Amounting to $2,613 00 

3. — Q)i account of Fuel, Furniture, Furnishing Goods, Hardware 

and Queensivare. 

For coal, 493 bushels $87 78 

For fire wood, 454 cords 908 00 

For chopping 159 cords 154 02 

For chairs, 9 doz 59 00 

For brooms, 1 J doz 2 35 

For brushes, 1 doz 1 75 

For 22 bed frames 16 50 

For prints for comforts, 378 yards 32 10 

For matresses 13 50 

For hardware 16 40 

For Queensware 7 50 

Amounting to $1,298 90 

4. — On account of Books, Stationery, Clothing, Medicines, Printing 

and Advertising. 

For Course of Instruction part I $30 00 

For Course of Instruction part II 13 50 

For Course of Instruction part III 5 00 

For Scripture Lessons 7 00 

For stationery 15 00 

For American Annals 60 60 



61 

For ready made clothing $28 75 

For shoes and boots 184 85 

For palm leaf hats, 46 11 05 

For medicine 20 52 

For printing 4,000 Views of Building.. 50 00 

For advertising 8 20 

For postage 30 00 

Amounting to $464 47 

5. — On account of Shops. 

For wages of master cooper $600 00 

For staves 87 00 

For freight and dray age 48 00 

Fortools l.r. 10 26 

For wages of master shoe maker. 600 00 

For stock 186 50 

Amounting to $1,531 76 

6. — On account of Improvements. 

Forplumhing $206 40 

For sheet lead and lead pipe 271 61 

For carpentry and joinery 321 12 

For lumber 100 00 

For brass and copper work 72 85 

For gas pipes 643 88 

For gas fixtures 345 45 

For freight 2 40 

For 16 thousand brick 80 00 

For digging and walling well 50 00 

For services of Architect 100 00 

For hardware 13 75 

Amounting to $2,207 46 

7. — On account of Ordinary Repairs. 

For repairing pumps $7 90 , 

For repairing harness 4 45 

For blacksmithing 7 01 "' 

For wagon work 30 00 



62 

For plastering $80 07 

For white-washing 141 00 

For lime and sand 17 75 

For pavement 13 60 

Amounting to $301 78 

8. — On account of Miscellaneous Items. 

For corn, 51J bushels $30 79 

For oats, 22| bushels 10 00 

For hay, 2 tons 28 88 

For straw, 5 loads 11 75 

For plants and seeds 22 75 

For bran, 100 bushels 11 50 

For 24 stock hogs 89 04 

Fori cow 26 50 

For 2 buffalo robes 21 00 

For plough 13 00 

For hauling 15 15 

For transportation of pupils 72 05 

For traveling expenses 130 05 

For use of Masonic Hall for Exhibition 20 00 

For City Directory 1 50 

B'or tuition refunded 45 00 

For freight on iron safe 4 80 

For hay rake 6 50 

For hauling gravel 6 70 

Amounting to $566 96 

9. — On account of Payments to Treasurer. 

For collections to March 20, 1857 $1,010 60 

For collections to April 27, 1857 454 00 

For collections to November 1, 1857.... 840 17 

Amounting to $2,304 77 

RECAPITULATION. 

Total receipts $21,476 14 

Total disbursements, viz : 

1. — On account of salaries and wages... $10,184 40 



63 

2. — On account of provisions and groce- 
ries 2,613 00 

3. — On account of fuel, furniture, fur- 
nishing goods, hardware and queens- 
ware 1,298 90 

4. — On account of books, stationery, 
clothing, medicines, printing and ad- 
vertising 464 47 

5. — On account of shops 1,531 76 

6. — On account of improvements 2,207 46 

7. — On account of ordinary repairs 301 78 

8. — On account of miscellaneous items . 566 96 

9. — On account of payments to Treas- ' !' 

urer 2,304 77 

Amounting to $21,473 50 

Balance on hand • $2 64 



Closely connected with this part of the subject is the indebted- 
ness of the Institution, of which we will now give some explana- 
tion. 

The aggregate of these debts is nine thousand and sixty-one 
dollars. They were legitimately contracted, as will appear from 
the statement which follows, and ought in some way be pro- 
vided for as soon as possible. The law for the government of 
this Institution provides only for quarterly meetings of the 
Board of Trustees. Accordingly' our estimates were made out 
quarterly and accounts settled in that way: this has uniformly 
been the custom since 1852. On application to the legislature 
five thousand dollars was granted to meet the expenses of the 
first quarter of the session. It was understood and expected 
that the appropriations would be made before the accounts for 
the second quarter would fall due ; this always had been done 
before last winter. It will be seen by a reference to our last re- 
port that a little more than the sum granted was on hand at the 
beginning of the year. After this had been expended purchases 
as usual were made on credit. The Legislature broke np; where- 
upon, when the Institution closed operations it was found the 
aggregate of these claims had reached the sum above stated. 



64 

Thej were all contracted on the faith of the State for improve- 
ments and repairs, groceries and provisions, and other necessary 
suppHes. By order of the Trustees these accounts have been 
carefully audited, and settled by issuing to the creditors certifi- 
cates of indebtedness, made payable with interest so soon as 
funds shall be supplied. 

A safe, cheap and convenient method of lighting buildings, 
separated as ours are from public gas works, is very much needed, 
and many experiments have been made in late years to obtain 
it. Of all the ways proposed none seems to give assurances of 
answering the end better than that of benzole gas. In as much 
as we have undertaken to make the experiment of lighting this 
Institution by this process, and since the Legislature has proposed 
to grant five thousand dollars to the Hospital for the Insane, for 
the purpose of introducing the method there, on condition that 
the experiment should prove successful here, it is incumbent 
upon us to give an account of the test so far as has it has been 
made. 

In our last report it was stated that the machine proposed to 
be used was the one patented by O. P. Drake, of Boston, and 
that a contract had been entered into with J. L. Drake, of Cin- 
cinnati, to furnish one of sufl3.cieut capacity to supply gas for 
one hundred burners. The apparatus was to have been com- 
pleted and introduced into the buildings by the first of October, 
1856. The price of the apparatus agreed upon was seven hun- 
dred and fifty dollars, payable one-half in advance and the 
balance at the end of six months, should the trial prove satisfac- 
tory. The light to be produced was guaranteed to be equal to 
that of the best common coal gas, and at a cost not to exceed 
the usual cost of that article in this market. If the trial 
proved satisfactory the machine was to be adopted; but if it 
failed in any ptirticular, then it was to be removed and the 
Institution repaid all advances and made good against all loss 
or detriment from its introduction into the buildings. Such 
were the terms of the contract. 

The pipes were all put into the buildings and every thing on 
our part made ready for the apparatus. But in consequence of 
unforeseen and unavoidable difiiculties the machinery could not 
be manufactured and got ready for the trial at the time first 



65 

proposed. And as the test could not be made with the machine 
which we had contracted for, Mr. Drake was allowed to put up 
in the buildings, on his own responsibility, a small apparatus for 
exhibition ; it had been used only a few weeks when the Insti- 
tution was suspended. After this event took place the matter 
T\^as suffered to rest until operations were resumed again; as 
soon as this was resolved upon the affair was taken up anew. 
The first of last month we succeeded in getting a hundred light 
machine put up and in complete operation. 

A\'^e have been using it now about a month, and are favorably 
impressed with it. The machinery works well; the light pro- 
duced is abundant, pure and pleasant to the eye ; but there has 
not been time to form any certain conclusions yet. We have 
some doubts as to the cheapness of the light, and whether the 
gas can be produced satisfactory in a temperature much above 
or below a medium heat. In these and other respects the test 
has yet to be made. 

Benzole is a volatile, resinous liquid, composed of hydrogen, 
carbon and oxygen, and exists very abundantly in the naphtha 
of coal, and is very easily obtained by distillation. Pure benzole 
is as light as ether, and evaporates as rapidly when exposed to 
the atmosphere , it is a powerful solvent of resins, wax, fatty 
matter, gutta percha and other like substances, and has often 
been used for this purpose as a substitute for alcohol. The 
word benzole is derived from benzoin, the name of a tree common 
in Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, of the order Styraeece, and of 
the species dryander, it is applied as the name of this substance 
because it is supposed to possess some of the resinous qualities 
of the gum of that tree. 

It is the vapor of benzole mixed with atmospheric air which 
composes the gas from which artificial light is produced. The 
vapor is very inflamable, but not explosive ; neither the sub- 
stance nor its properties are of recent discovery. Benzole has 
long been known in Scotland, and manufactured and used, 
especially as a substitute for alcohol for mechanical purposes. 
Even the application of it to the production of gas-light is not 
a very recent invention. It was attempted in England more 
than twenty years ago. Mr. Beal, of London, in 1836, patented 
a machine for forcing common air into a receiver containing 



66 

benzole, and for burning the vapor thus formed as an illumin- 
ator. The first person known to have attempted anything of 
the kind in this country was the celebrated Mr. Payne, of 
Worcester, jMassachusetts, who attempted to light the Astor 
House, in jS'ew York, with gas produced from water; failing in 
this he turned his attention to other substances, and obtained a 
patent for a machine for the production of gas from benzole 
mixed w^ith alcohol, water and air; he also used turpentine in 
some of his experiments. Though he did not succeed in per- 
fecting an apparatus so as to render it practicable in use; yet 
the machine which he invented and the principles which he dis- 
covered and demonstrated have been the foundation of most of 
the improvements subsequently made. ISTot long after several 
machines were constructed and some of them patented, for the 
application of benzole in a variety of combinations, to the pro- 
duction of gas-light, and among others one by Mr. J. Carpenter, 
who absurdly claimed the exclusive right to the use of benzole 
for this purpose. 

In all the earlier machines defects were found which prevented 
the introduction of the process into buildings for lighting. Ben- 
zole in a low temperature evaporates slowly and the vapor con- 
denses rapidly, and thus the proportion of carbon is lessened, so 
that the gaseous substance evolved will not support combustion. 
On the contrary when the temperature is too high the evapora- 
tion takes place too rapidly and the vapor mixes too freely with 
the air, too much carbon is combined in the gas, so that it burns 
too fast and emits a disagreeable smoky exhalation. 

The owner of the right of the machine which we are using, 
professes to have overcome these obstacles. He claims that in 
his apparatus, by an ingenious contrivance of machinery, wdiich 
he has patented, both the evaporation of the benzole, and the 
combination of the vapor with the atmosphere, as well as the 
distribution of the gas, are so regulated as to produce a clear, 
steady light, within any moderate range of temperature. That 
this difhculty has been wholly overcome, we have strong doubts; 
but that the a])paratus is a very great improvement upon any 
other one wliich has yet been exhibited, we arc fully convinced; 
and we arc inclined to believe that it may be satisfactorily used 
in the range of temperature of summer or winter ordinarily 



67 

found in dwellings in this climate. Within a compass of from 
40 to 100 degrees of heat, it may be practicable; we have not 
yet made trial of it at either of these extremes. 

The cost of this kind of light compared with others, is a very 
important point. The expense depends mainly on the cost of 
the apparatus, and the material from which the gas is made. In 
converting benzole into gas, no labor is required except to wind 
up the machinery once a week, and fill the receiver with the 
liquid. The machinery is simple, and comparatively cheap. The 
cost, therefore, of the light, depends chiefly upon the price of 
benzole. Of the probable supply and cost of this article, no 
very certain information has been obtained. The actual cost of 
manufacturing it from coal, we believe to be less than fifty cents 
per gallon. The article formerly imported from Scotland, sold 
as low as one dollar a gallon; but the demand so far exceeded 
the supply in this country, that the price has been as high as one 
dollar and seventy-five cents. Such has been, however, the 
enormous profits made on it at the price at which it has hereto- 
fore been sold, that manufactories of it have been commenced in 
various parts of the country; works have been established at 
Cloversport in Kentucky, at Cincinnati in Ohio, at Kanawha in 
Virginia, at Williamsburg in New York, and in Pennsylvania. 
If the application of it to the production of artificial light 
proves successful, it will be manufactured in quantities sufiicient 
to answer the demand, and competition in the market will re- 
duce the charges on it to a reasonable profit on the cost of 
making it. Already this has, in some measure, been realized; 
the last that we purchased was bought at one dollar and twenty- 
five cents per gallon, and since that we have been offered a 
esupply at one dollar a gallon. 

In England the estimates of the amount of benzole required 
to produce a quantity of light equal to that of 1000 cubic feet 
of coal gas, is one gallon and a half. In this country it is esti- 
mated that from two to two and a half gallons are necessary. 
The American benzole is considerably lighter than the Scotch, 
and in burning consumes more rapidly ; but it gives a brighter 
and better light. We have used both, and find the Scotch ben- 
zole to be at least one pound per gallon heavier than the other; 
but not so pure, and more liable to condense. Upon the whole, 



68 

that manutaetured in this eouutry is preferable : what is lost in 
the quantity of light is more than made up in the quality. 

The above estimates are given as a mere approximation to the 
truth. Although this process of lighting has been used for 
several years, yet we have not been able to obtain any more 
definite information on the subject. The experiment which we 
have commenced, has not yet progressed far enough to enable 
us to say more than that the machinery seems to work satisfac- 
torily ; that the light produced is abundant, and of good quality ; 
and that we are strongly encouraged to hope that the attempt 
will prove successful. "Whether it will succeed in cold weather? 
whether benzole can be obtained in such quantities, and at such 
a price, as will justify its use? and how much of the liquid any 
given number of burners will exhaust in a given time? are 
questions yet to be decided. 

A sufficient corps of talented, experienced and faithful teach- 
ers, to an Institution like this, is, as must be evident to the most 
superficial observer, second in importance to nothing else. And 
from the peculiar nature of the methods of instruction pursued, 
and from the long time required to gaiu a practicable knowledge 
of the art, there is nothing more difficult in the successful man- 
agement of such an enterprise, than to maintain a full corps of 
such instructors. In this respect we are happy to know that for 
several years past the Indiana Institution has not been inferior 
to any other one in the laud. When, therefore, the school was 
suspended last spring, our greatest anxiety, aside from the dis- 
persion of the pupils, was lest we might lose the services of any 
of our teachers. To give assurances of the confidence of the 
Board in their ability, and to retain them if possible, they were 
at the annual meeting in July last, all re-elected for another 
year, to ro-entor upon the performance of their duties so soon 
as operations should be resumed. As their salaries were i)aid 
only up to the end of the year for which they were then en- 
gaged, it was left optional with each of them either to abide the 
decision of the question of the re-opening of the Asylum, or to 
seek employment elsewhere. During the recess most of them 
had situations, more or less desirable, offiercd them; and had the 
suspension continued much longer, most, if not all of them, 
would, in all probability, have made such engagements as would 



69 

have prevented us from availing ourselves again of their services. 
Two of them had received appointments as teachers in the ISTew 
York Institution, and had entered upon the discharge of their 
duties; a personal and urgent appeal was made to the distin- 
guished President of that Institution, II. P. Peet, L. L. D., who 
generously, and with much inconvenience to himself, for which 
act of kindness we are most profoundly grateful, released them 
from their engagement and permitted them to return to this 
field of labor. 

In view, therefore, of the dangers to which we have been ex- 
posed of having our excellent corps of teachers broken up, it is 
no small gratification to us to be able to announce, that they 
have all returned to the service of the Institution, and are en- 
gaged in prosecuting, with their accustomed energy and zeal, 
their appropriate work. We most cordially commend them all 
to the respect and confidence of the parents and friends of the 
pupils, as worthy of the high trust committed to them of in- 
structing their unfortunate children in a knowledge of the ways 
of truth and virtue. 

To the cultivation of the farm connected with the Institution, 
there has been given by the Steward, during the past season, an 
unusual amount of personal attention, released, as he has been, 
from other duties, by the suspension of the school. The labor 
and attention bestowed upon it, through the blessing of a kind 
Providence, have been rewarded by a more abundant harvest 
than has ever in any previous year been gathered ; of corn, oats, 
and hay for provender, and of apples, potatoes, cabbage and 
other culinary vegetables, it has furnished a plentiful supply for 
the winter. And although, in the absence of the pupils, a por- 
tion of the labor of cultivation had to be hired, yet the return 
of products has more than compensated for all the expense in- 
curred. It is estimated that the aggregate value of the products 
of the farm for the year, has been not less than twenty-five hun- 
dred dollars, and the nett profits between five and six hundred 
dollars. In this calcuhition the interest of the capital invested, 
and the whole cost of cultivation is charged, and only the cur- 
rent price of the articles produced, credited. 

The Institution, however, is fortunate in the possession of a 
farm, not so much for the pecuniary advantages derived from it, 



70 

as for the benefits it confers upon the pupils, in affording them 
a healthful exercise, and in giving to them a practical knowl- 
edge of an honorable and useful occupation. Many of them 
are accustomed at home to this kind of labor, and expect £0 
pursue it after they finish their course of study; it is important, 
therefore, that such have the opportunity of gaining, so far as 
is practicable, a knowledge of this business. This class of per- 
sons by their infirmity are excluded from many of the useful 
avocations of life ; of all the pursuits to which they have access, 
none is more reputable or more suitable for them, than this 
occupation. In this important particular, no Institution for the 
Deaf and Dumb, any where else, possesses advantages superior 
to ours; most of them in this country being located in cities, 
are forced to make mechanics of their pupils, whatever may be 
their inclinations or desires, or else allow them to grow up in 
idleness. That institution which does not train its pupils in 
habits of industry, and the practice of some useful occupation, 
fails in a very essential particular to fulfill its proper mission. 
Equally erroneous is that kind of training which attempts to 
prepare them for a sphere in life which they are incapable of 
filling, 

AV'hile the general health of the pupils during the year has 
been as good as usual, yet we are called upon to mourn the death 
of two of our number. The first, IsToah H. Mills, from Wabash 
county in this State, died from congestive fever, at the Institu- 
tion, on the 26th of November last. He had been under in- 
struction about three years, had made considerable advances in 
knowledge, was very amiable in his dispositions, and was much 
beloved both by teachers and pupils in the Asylum. He was 
possessed naturally of rather a feeble constitution, and, after a 
year's absence from the school, returned at the commencement of 
last term in somewhat delicate health. When taken with dis- 
ease, notwithstanding every thing was done for him which 
medical skill and careful nursing could do, yet he survived the 
attack only about a week. The other death was that of a young 
lady, Miss (Catharine Lampkins, of Bloomington in Monroe 
county; her decease took place at home among her kindred, 
during the summer after the school was broken up. Of the 
circumstances connected with her last sickness and death, we 



71 

are not informed. While connected with the Institution, though 
naturally endowed with only ordinary mental abilities, yet by 
diligent application she had made very considerable progress in 
learning ; and by her strict propriety of conduct she had gained 
the confidence and esteem of all her associates. 

In our last report, the pressing wants of the Institution in 
respect to a new heating apparatus and a laundry, were urged 
upon the attention of the Legislature, and an appropriation for 
these purposes was solicited; the great necessity of these im- 
provements to the safety, comfort, and convenience of the estab- 
lishment, was fully admitted by that body, and a report favorable 
to the grant was made by the joint committee of the two Houses, 
and the amount recommended was embodied in the general 
appropriation bill. Unfortunately that bill failed in the Senate 
and left the Institution without the means of providing for 
these wants, deemed of such prime necessity. The winter is 
now coming on, and w^e have been unable to devise any means 
of obviating the great inconveniences resulting from their ab- 
sence. No little trouble is anticipated in warming the buildings, 
and in w^ashing and drying the clothing for the pupils, with the 
defective and worn out apparatus in use, with all the repairs 
that can be made. The furnaces are so nearly w^orn out, that no 
mere repairs which they will admit of, will render them either 
safe or efficient. Every thing has boon done that could be, to 
render them secure against tire. Even if we had the means to 
re-place them by new ones, it is not desirable that it should be 
done, because the method is so radically defective. The furnaces 
which we have been using are as good, perhaps, as any hot-air 
furnaces that are manufactured. They are not adapted to heat 
buildings the size of ours. They have been thoroughly tried, 
and are found to be insufHcient, insecure, and expensive. The 
fire-chambers soon burn out, and have to be renewed every two 
or three years. At least fifty per cent, of the heat generated by 
the consumption of the fuel, is lost by escaping from the hot air- 
chambers, and by absorption in tlie brick flues through which 
the hot air passes in going into the rooms; besides, there is no 
way to regulate the supply of cold air from without, and the 
transmission and distribution of the heated air properly, among 
the difterent apartments. In these respects they are found to be 



72 

as liiieertain and as variable as the weather. ITnder a strong 
wukI, the air is driven in through the hot air-chambers up into 
the rooms, and passes out the ventilating flues ahnost asjcold as 
it was before it ontorod: if the ventilating flues be closed, then 
the rooms will be filled with a btirut, impure and unhealthy 
atmosphere, which is worse than a comparative cold tempera- 
ture. And we must add, that they are all very liable to smoke; 
all ours do, and sometimes to an extent beyond endurance. 

There are about eighty rooms, besides halls, in the buildings, 
which require to be warmed. There are but four fire-places in 
these rooms. Six of Walker's hot air-furnaces, and eighteen 
stoves, are necessary in cold weather in order to render these 
apartments warm enough for the purposes for which they are 
used. Four hundred and fifty cords of dry wood, and from one 
to two thousand bushels of coal, are consumed annually. In 
very cold weather the fires have to be kept up night and day, 
which requires two hands. But notwithstanding all these appli- 
ances, the buildings are frequently very uncomfortable. Hence 
we are constrained to renew the recommendation, that at as 
early a day as possible, measures be adopted to remedy the evils 
complained of, by the introduction of steam, which is believed 
to be the most economical and efiicient mode for warming our 
buildings, of any which has yet been proposed. 

A list of the names and residences of the pupils who have 
been connected with the Institution during the last year, will be 
found in the appendix. '^ 

Since the foundation of the Institution up to this time, three 
hundred and sixty-seven deaf-mutes have enjoyed its advantages 
for a longer or a shorter period of time. The average number 
of new pupils admitted annually, has been a fraction over 
twenty-eight. Of those who have been discharged, the average 
length of time which they have been under instruction, is only 
about three years and a half. At first, a large portion of those 
who were admitted as pupils, were between eighteen and thirty 
years of age ; and such left, usually, at the end of one, two, or 
three years. Besides this, there was a very general error in the 
public mind, respecting the length of time requisite for a deaf- 
mute to gain a knowledge of our language, and the most 
cominou branches of an education. Three years were thought 



73 

to be enough, and in several of the States the course of study 
was limited to that period. But a very decided change has 
taken place in the public sentiment, on this subject; there is 
now some just conception of the difficulties of instructing this 
class of persons, and of the time, and patience, and labor re- 
quired on their part, to go through a course of study necessary 
to ht them for the duties of life. Seven years is now usually 
esteemed the shortest period in which this work can ordinarily 
be accomplished. In this State it is left, very properly we think, 
to the Board of Trustees to fix the age of admission, and the 
length of the course of study. Seven years, heretofore, has been 
found fully to meet the wants of the community. In the Amer- 
ican Asylum, and the Institution in New York, the course has 
been extended to ten years. Such pupils as arc the most talent- 
ed, and who have successfully passed through tlie usual course 
of seven years, and are desirous of continuing their studies 
farther, are allowed three years to prosecute a course of study 
in the sciences. Those admitted to this department, compose 
what is denominated the High Class, of each of those Institu- 
tions; If this Institution continues to prosper as it has in years 
past, it will not be long before a similar privilege will be de- 
manded here. Pupils now enter younger, and continue under 
instruction much longer, than they formerly did, and the ad- 
vanced classes are much fuller. This session the older pupils 
more generally returned, than those who belong to the junior 
classes. The class which has just entered upon the seventh year 
of the course, for numbers, for talent, and for attainments, is 
worthy of special notice ; it would be an honor to any institu- 
tion. Yet we have not the affectation to call it a "Hisrh Class," 
or to suppose that we have yet supplied the great desideratum of 
deaf-mute education in the West. If, at the end of this session, 
a number of this class, sufficient to justify it, should wish to 
enter upon a three year's course of study in the higher branches, 
the question of the formation of such a department will be pre- 
sented for consideration. Several of them have expressed a 
strong wish to be allowed this privilege. 

In concluding this report, it is proper to express our high 
appreciation of the ability and zeal of those associated with us 
in carrying forward this great cause. All of them, without 
2 D. J.— 6. 



74 

exception, liave devoted themselves faithfully to their appropri- 
ate duties, and have uniformly shown a willingness heartily to 
co-operate with one another, and with the head of the Institu- 
tion, in advancing its best interests. It is therefore a great 
pleasure, as well as a duty we owe them, to commend them to 
your continued coniidence and cordial respect. 

All which is respectfull}^ submitted, 

THOMAS MAC mTIRE, 

November 1st, 1857. Superintendent. 



APPENDIX, 



CATALOGUE. 



Catalogue of Pupils in the Institution from November 1st, 1856, 
to November 1st, 1857. 




Alley, Enoch 

Amraerinan, John W.. 
Anderson, Esther A.... 

Anderson, Martha 

Arnett, Mary E 

Arnot, John M 

Arnot, Wm. T 

Atkison, David G 

Ballinger, Wm 

Banks, David 

Bates, William E 

Bannon, John D... 

Brown, Ezra Win 

Brown, Wm. Wallace. 

Brown, James D 

Bruner, Malinda 

Belcher, Sarah N 

Bishop, Benjamin F.... 

Bussord, C 

Barns, Anna 

Church, Molly L 

Clark, Robert F 

Cole, Francis M 

Cole, .Joab R 

Collins, John D 

Coffey, Harriet E 

Consley, Benjamin F.. 

Cooper, Wm. H. H 

Gripe, Jacob 

Cross, Elcista 

Curtiss, Charles , 

Cutler, Laura II 

Callicotte, Mary Ann. 

Crispin, Wm. Albert.. 

Dargahn, Ellen 

Dean, Henry K 



Clifty 

New Point 

Spring Hill 

Lebanon 

Parkersburg 

Delphi 

Delphi 

Delphi 

Martinsville 

Memphis 

Warsaw 

Woodbury 

Connersville 

Vv 'arsaw 

Folda 

Nicholsonville 

South Bend 

New Elizabeth 

Bedford 

Logansport 

Memphis 

Leonidas 

Roseville 

Roseville 

Greenfield 

Bloomfield 

Saluda 

Laconia 

North Manchester, 

Merrillville 

Eugene 

Laporte 

Dupout 

Avilla 

Connersville 

Cincinnati , 



Decatur. 

Decatur. 

Decatur. 

Boone. 

Montgomery. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Morgan. 

Shelby, Tenn. 

Kosciusko. 

Hamilton. 

Fayette. 

Kosciusko. 

Spencer. 

Putnam. 

St. Joseph. 

Hendricks. 

Lawrence. 

Cass. 

Shelby, Tenn. 

St. Joseph, Mich.. 

Parke. 

Parke. 

Hancock. 

Greene. 

Jefferson. 

Harrison. 

Wabash. 

Lake. 

Vermillioa. 

Laporte. 

Jenninga. 

Noble. 

Fayette. 

Ohio. 



78 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS.— Continued. 



NAME. 




Dillinan. Sarah , 

Dillman, John 

Diver, William G 

Donahew, Cynthia A 

Doran, Jesse E 

Duggins, Alexander... 

Edens, Mahlon 

Edminster, Mary A.... 

Eldred, Aurilla 

Ellis, Mary Jane 

Enochs, Wm. G 

Enochs, James T 

Enochs, Marietta 

Etter. Andrew 

Fairfield, Clarinda 

Farren, Jane 

Free, Cyrus 

French, William M.... 

Frybarger, George 

Fuller, Jacob 

Ganson, Abigal K 

Ganson, Frederick 

Goodwin, John H 

Graham, E. J 

Graham, James R 

Gunn, Emily 

Guard, Rachel B 

Hack, William 

Hadley. Amos 

Hall. James 

Halsted, Amos 

Harvey, Jacob H 

Hartney, Murphy 

Heck, Mathias , 

Herron. John 

Herrick, Stephen H 

Howe, Reuben 

Humbolt, Mary 

Husshaw, Benjamin 

Innes, Thomas 

Jones, Jemima Jane 

Kimball, Nathan 

KinjTsbury, Elizabeth.. 

Knibbs, Mary Ann 

Lusher, Henry M 

*Lanipkins, Catharine. 

Lewark, Mary Ann 

Lindsay, John 

Lord, Cecelia U 

Loving, Joshua C 

Maddux, Sarah F 

Mann, Austin W 

M'-harry, Allen W 

Miller, Mary 



Franklin 

Franklin 

Milton 

Fincastle 

Columbia 

Lafayette 

Haysville 

Queensville , 

Liberty , 

Clarksville 

Mitchell 

Mitchell 

Mitchell 

Alama 

Prairietown 

Dillsborough 

Anderson 

Leesville 

Connersville 

New Burlington. 

Fraucesville 

Francesville 

Blue Ridge 

Sullivan 

Crawfordsville... 

Connersville 

Lawrenceburg... 

Knightstown 

Mooresville 

Ladoga 

Manilla 

Mount Auburn .. 

Homersville 

Madison 

Indianapolis , 

Wintersville 

Laketown , 

Vincennes 

Attica 

St. Clair 

Newcastle 

Hartford 

Evansville 

Corydon 

Memphis 

Bloomington 

Anderson 

Hart's Mills 

Madison 

Michigan (Mty.... 

Frankfort 

Siili)hiir Springs. 

Pleasa-nt Hill 

Shaseville 



Johnson. 

Johnson. 

Wayne. 

Putnam. 

Chicot, Ark. 

Tippecanoe. 

Dubois. 

Jennings. 

St. Joseph. 

Tippecanoe. 

Lawrence. 

Lawrence. 

Lawrence. 

Montgomery. 

Vigo. 

Dearborn. 

Madison. 

Lawrence. 

Fayette. 

Delaware. 

Pulaski. 

Pulaski. 

Shelby. 

Sullivan. 

Montgomery. 

Fayette, 

Dearborn. 

Henry. 

Morgan. 

Montgomery. 

Rush. 

Shelby. 

Laporte. 
Jefferson. 

Marion. 

Decatur. 

Wabash. 

Knox. 

Fountain. 

Port Huron, Mich. 

Henry. 

Blackford. 

Vanderburg. 

Harrison. 

Shelby, Tenn. 

Monroe. 

Madison. 

Ripley. 

Jefferson. 

Laporte. 

Clinton. 

Henry. 

Montgomery. 

Owen. 



79 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS.— Continued. 



NAME. 



TOWN. 



Minton, Wm Indianapolis 

McCray, Peter Knightstown 

McFadden, Margaret J Allinsville 

McFadden, Robert Allinsville 

McKirn, Margaret Madison 

McKim, John R Madison 

McKim, Isabella Madison 

McLaughlin, James Louis 

McLaughlin, Margaret Louis 

McQueen, Miranda J Wolcott's Mills 

Miller, Jeiferson W Harrison 

Miller, Harrison Harrison 

*Mills, Noah 11 North Manchester. 

Mitchell, Thomas I) Polk Run 

Mori-ow, Lewis A Pittsboro 

Nicoles, Peter N Peru 

Norris, Frances M Indianapolis 

Norris, Andrew J Indianapolis 

Orchard. Marcellus A Bloomington 

Owens, Joseph E Westport 

Owens, Frances C .' Bennington 

Parker, George H Kokomo 

Parker, Zerubbabel Roseville 

Parrish, William Beech Grove 

Perigo, Mary Granville 

Pointon, Mary Ann Laporte 

Prather, James A Jeffersonville 

Prather, Sarah C Jeft'ersouville 

Prather, Lucy Ann Jeffersonville , 

Priest, Joseph AV Rushville , 

Reinhart, Henry S Delphi 

Rinchar, Martha Burlington 

Roberts, Mahlon C Wabash , 

Russell, Palmer P Pendleton 

Rude, Martha Austin 

Sampson, Francis M Wabash 

Sebring, James Fort Wayne , 

Sebring, Henry Fort Wayne 

Sebring, Sarah Ann Fort Wayne 

Segrave, James Carrollton , 

Shanks, John Scotland 

Shasteen, James Allen Frankford , 

Simpson, James Salem , 

Sites, Lydia A i Fair view 

Skinner, .John A j Rogersville 

Smith, Mary H Greenwood 

Snidei", Isabella j Battle Ground 



Stafford, Elizabeth E.. 

Stroud, Joseph 

Stroud, Joshua 

Stubbs, John 

Stewart, John G. P. 

Tatem, Mary E 

Tatem, Sally M 



Martinsville 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Kewana 

Miamitown 

Baker's Corners. 
Baker's Corners. 



COUNTY. 



Marion. 

Henry. 

Switzerland. 

Switzerland. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Vigo. 

Vigo. 

Lagrange. 

Delaware. 

Delaware. 

Wabash. 

Clark. 

Hendricks. 

Miami. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Monroe. 

Decatur. 

Switzerland. 

Howard. 

Parke. 

Rush. 

Sullivan. 

Laporte. 

Clark. 

Clark. 

Clark. 

Rush. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Wabash. f 

Madison. 

Scott. 

Wabash. 

Allen. 

Allen. 

Allen. 

Carroll. 

Green. 

Scott. 

Washington. 

Randolph. 

Henry. 

Johnson. 

Tippecanoe. 

ISIorgan. 

Vanderburg. 

Vanderburg. 

Fulton. 

Miami. 

Tippecanoe. 

Tippecanoe. 



80 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS.— Continued. 



NAME. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Tiisiiig, Hannah 




Kosciusko. 


Underwood, Margaret J 




Van Arsdol, AVilliam 


New Burlington 

Stilesville 


Delaware, 
Hendricks. 
Elkhart. 
Blackford 


Vest, Mary E 


Virgil, Flora 


Bristol 

Hartford 


Watkins, Catharine M 


Weaver, Sylvester 






Werner, Adam 




Vanderburg; 
Laporte. 


White, Elizabeth A 




White, Granville K 




White, James J 


Quincy 




Whitenger, Rachel E 


South Bend 


St. Joseph. 


Williams, Joseph C 




Williams, Elizabeth 






Wilson, Isaac 


Sharp's Mills 




Woods, David W 


Martinsville 


Morgan. 


Woodward, Mary M 


Wright. Cheniah C 




White 


Yeoman, Minerva 




Jasper. 


Young, William M 


Princeton 

Mn.r-lrpf 


Zumro, Joseph 


Huntington. 





•Deceased. 



C N T E ] B U T 1 N S . 



The following list of contributions have been gratuitously made to the Institution 
during the last year, for which the thanks of the officers and pupils are due to the 
donors, and are hereby most respectfully tendered. 

NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES. 



NAMES. 



Indianapolis Daily Journal 

Indianapolis Daily State Sentinel 

Locomotive 

Christian Record 

New Albany Weekly Ledger 

The Western Christian Advocate. 

Masonic Review 

N. W. Christian Magazine 

The Boone County Pioneer 

St. Joseph Valley Register 

The JetFersonian 

Madison Weekly Courier 

Putnam Republican Banner 

Lafayette Courier 

The American Eagle 

The Princeton Clarion 

Standard and Press 

Saturday Evening Post 

The White River Standard 

The Fort Wayne Sentinel 

The Washington Democrat 

The Vincennes Gazette 

Democratic Pharos 

The Elkhart Herald 

Practical Obsei-ver 

Presbyterian S. S. Visitor 

Miami County Sentinel 

The Independent Press 

Michigan City Transcript 

The Constitutionalist 

Michigan City Enterprise 



EDITORS. 



B. R. Sulgrove. 
Bingham & Doughty. 
J. R. Elder. 

J. M. Mathes. 

Norman, Morrison & Mathews, 

C. Elliot. 
C. Moore. 
JohH Boggs. 

Geo. M. Buckingham. 
Schuyler Colfax, 
James Elder. 
M. C. Garber. 
William Mathews. 
W. S. Lingle. 
II. Comingore. 
William Curtz. 
E. F. Sibley. 
Deacon & Paterson.. 
E. D. Pearson. 
Thomas Tigar. 
William Williams. 
J. A. Mason. 
S. A. Hall. 
L. A. & C. L. Alford. 
William C. Talcott. 
P. B. of Publication, 
John A. Graham 
Gauifeau & Drury. 
R. W. Colfax. 
L. E. Knapp, 
L, B. Wright. 



82 



NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES.— Continued. 



NAMES. 


EDITORS. 






Terre Haute Journal 


G. F. Cookerly & Co. 
JM. J. Clark. 


The AVituess 


Tlie Relii^ious Telescope 


John Lawrence 


The Alton Weekly Courier 


George T. Brown. 
W. T. Hatch. 


The Evening Courier 


The Herald and Era 


Williamson Abbott & Lee 







BOOKS, MONEYS, &c. 



The Tutler, 4 vols. 12 mo.; The Spectator, 8 vols. 12 mo.; The Guardian, 3 vols 
12 mo.; The Rambler, 3 vols. 12 mo.; The Adventurer, 3 vols. 12 mo.; The World, 3 
vols. 12 mo.; Grote's History of Greece, 12 vols. 8vo.; Kane's Arctic Expedition, 2 
vols. 8vo.; Benton's Thirty Years, 2 vols, royal 8vo.; Bayard Taylor's Cyclopedia of 
Modern Travel, 1 vol. royal 8vo., by the young ladies of the Institution, from the 
proceeds of sales of fancy articles manufactured by them. 

Chambers Miscellany, 10 vols. 12mo., purchased with a donation of money made 
by Mrs. Eliza Frybarger, of Conuersville. 

U. S. Coast Survey, 1854, together with other valuable Congressional Documents, 
by the Hon. Jesse D. Bright. 

Messages and Documents, 1856-7, Patent Office Report, 1855, together with other 
valuable congressional Documents, by the Hon. Lucian Barbour. 

THOMAS MAC INTIRE, 

NovtMiiber Ist, 1857. Superintendent. 

I 





SPECIMENS OE PUPILS' COMPOSITIONS. 



[To the uneducated deaf and dumb, the English language is wholly an unknown 
tongue. In instructing them, a primary object always kept in view, is to commu- 
nicate to them a knowledge of written language. Their ability to express their 
thoughts in this way, is looked upon by many as the measure of their attainments. 
It being to them the only door of access to social and business intercourse with 
society, it is that without which all other knowledge will do them very little good. 
A few short specimens of compositions of those of different ages, and who have 
been under instruction from six months to six and a half years, are here inserted, 
believing that they will serve ,to give a correct idea of the attainments of the 
pupils' in this respect. These compositions are wholly their own, except such 
corrections as they themselves made, on the errors being pointed out to them by 
their teachers.] ■ t ' 



BY A LITTLE GIRL UNDER INSTRUCTION SIX MONTHS. 

A black cow bite. A little girl pretty. A white cat throw dead. A window 
stands girl. A black horse cross. A falls child from. A white cat plays. A 
yellow leaf. A good pen clean. A white horse is not cross. A fence woman 
walks. A bad pen long. A lady stands pretty. That baby sleeps pretty. That 
man walks. These boys are writes. That horse runs, jumps. That green tree. 
A strong girl walks. A woman talks. A man reads. A. C. 



BY A LITTLE GIRL UNDER INSTRUCTION SEVEN MONTHS. 

That bird fly tree. That bird on fence. That kitten have plays. That cat walks 
in house. That little lady pretty. That little ring. That is very long frock. That 
gentleman write. That red ring small. That child sleep bed. That cat catch 
mouse. Those boy is play. Those apples are on tree. These red berry good. Those 
duck swim water. Those girl is whip. Those boy skate. Those woman read. 
Those book is not little. Those little copy-books. Those girl dance. C. F. 



84 

BY A LITTLE GIRL UNDER INSTRUCTION SEVEN MONTHS. 

This boy is foolish. That child is love kittens often. There are two boys throw 
a Btone cat. That girl is not love cat. These girls is near a window. That woman 
is sweep. That lady is play, that dog and bite that lady hand. These dog is play, 
and bile a girl. That poor is love woman and bring new frock. That woman is 
walk. This girl is washing a dirty frock. Those ladies walking. Those men 
working a wagon. That child is laughing. That red frock is pretty. That woman 
is love a baby. Those boys are running. There are five men lift a sick horse. 
That lady is pretty. That yellow bird is pretty. That horse is kind, not kicking. 

E. W. 



BT A LITTLE BOY UNDER INSTRUCTION EIGHT MONTHS. 

A woman is churning. The mother goes to get some salt. An ape comes to the 
churn. The ape takes a cat. The ape puts the cat in the churn. The ape runs 
and climbs on the tree. The woman calls the ape. She tries to whip the ape. 

B. F. C. 



BY A LITTLE BOY UNDER INSTRUCTION EIGHT MONTHS. 

A man went to the woods. He carried his axe to cut down trees. When he was 
chopping, ten Indians came and seized the man. The Indians had bow and arrows. 
The Indians sat on a log, they promised not to kill the man. The Indians saw a 
bear. The Indians killed the bear. The Indians did not hurt the man. M. H. 



THE UNGRATEFUL BOY. 

BY A SEMI-MUTE UNDER INSTRUCTION ONE AND A HALF YEARS. 

On a fine winter morning, as a boy was going to school, he had more than a mile 
to walk, and did not like it very well. There chanced to over-take him soon after 
be set out a man with a team, and sleigh. The boy tliouglit to himself tliat it was 
rather hard to walk so far through tlie snow, and seeing the sleigh coming, wished 
very much to have a pleasant ride. As the sleigh came up to where he was, he 
jumped into it without even asking leave from the driver. The driver of course 
did not say any thing against him for getting into liis sleigh, as it was not heavily 
loaded, and his team was strong, and he was without company. The boy seeing 
this began to feel quite comfortable in his seat, and at the same time moving 
briskly on hia way to school. The driver, feeling lonesome, began to ask the 



85 

Bchool boy some questions in relation to his school, and how ho liked it, and what 
kind of trade he intended to follow after he had finished his education. The school 
boy did not seem to answer, or pay any attention to what the driver asked him, 
but seemed to be thinking about his pleasant ride, and what he would have to say 
to his school fellows, when he arrived at the school house. The driver receiving no 
answer to his questions, began to think what an ungrateful boy he was so kind to 
allow to ride in his sleigh, and of his parents, and teacher who did not train him 
up to show better manners, and to respect those that helped him, &c. Soon the 
sleigh arrived where the school house stood. The school boy jumped out of the 
eleigh, and took up a snow-ball, and threw it at the driver in the place of thanking 
him for the pleasant ride that he had enjoyed in his sleigh. J. II. 



ABOUT MYSELF. 



BY A YOUNG MAN UNDFR INSTRUCTION ONE AND A HALF YEARS. 

I went to Indianapolis last April. I got on the cars for Greencastle, and then 1 
went to Orleans, Ind., and I could not find the way from it to Dubois Co. I slept 
under some straw all the night. I then returned to Orleans, and then went to 
Bloomington. I rested on the Sunday until Monday. I rode in the cars, but it 
happened that it was upset on the ground. I could not wait for a long time, then 
I walked back to Orleans on the railroad, and the cars came against my side, and 
I was struck down to the ground. At that time I did not feel hurt. Some gentle- 
men saw me, and put me in the cars which were going to Orleans. They put me 
in the bed, my eyes were not opened for four and half days. A man who knew me 
wrote to my mothei', and told her that I was almost killed by the cars. My step- 
father's son came after me, and found me. He brotight me home. I became well 
in a few days and then I went out to plow, mow, and make barrels. I have decided 
I will not stand or walk on a railroad track in mv life. M. E. 



THE FIELD OF SCIENCE. 

BY A YOUNG MAN, DEAF, BUT NOT DUMB, UNDER INSTRUCTION EIGHTEEN MONTHS. 

The farther we pursue our way in the field of science with attention and admira- 
tion, the brighter its splendor shines, and the keener becomes our desire for ram- 
bling amid its intricacies and investigating the knowledge of its numerous vari- 
eties; yet none save those who have long devoted themselves, and closely stored 
their minds with knowledge can realize the benefit derived therefrom; for every 
department of nature is filled with beauty and design, and by particular observa- 



86 

tion -vre may always find delight and confidence in this study; and thus become 
more sensible of God's wonderful works. 

But tins valued prize cannot be obtained without labor and exertion, and if we fail 
to store our minds with useful knowledge when in our youth (which is the seed time 
of life) by idling away our time, how forlorn and dark will be our pilgrimage! 

Indeed there is nothing like being industrious and doing our duty in every way 
useful we can. It is both making ourselves happy and prosperous in this world, 
and alluring us on to a world of eternal happiness. 

Not only is it our duty to try to become wise and useful ourselves, but also to 
strive to induce others to do so. If we do not succeed in our attempt still it is our 
duty to try. 

Yet how many who know and understand what is their duty still shun the com- 
mandments which God has given us. Many, I am sorrow to say, rather than sub- 
mit to their duty would give up their hope in heaven for earthly consolations and 
thereafter bear the wrath of God through endless ages. 

But there is nothing so precious to life as having a highly cultivated mind, that 
our hearts may know and understand, and also applying our ability in the way 
commanded us; although it may be toilsome and profitless to ourselves through 
life, but we shall be rewarded tenfold hereafter. For thus saith the Lord: "Come 
unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden and I will give you rest: take my 
yoke upon you and learn of me, for my yoke is easy and my burden is light." 

L. ALX. M. 



A TEA PARTY. 

BY A LAD THIRTEEN YEARS OLD, OF TWO-AND-A-HALF YEARS ATTENDANCE. 

One cool day, a little boy went to the garden, and he gathered strawberries in a 
basket, and he heard a snake hiss at him. He was angry and killed the snake. 
The boy carried a basket home on his shoulder. He told his parents about killing 
a snake. His parents kept the strawberries till evening, when some friends came 
to a tea party. They were pleased to talk with each other. Late at night the 
friends left and returned to their homes. R. McF. 



BY A GIRL FIFTEEN YEARS OLD, OF TWO-AND-A-HALF YEARS ATTENDANCE. 

Some gentlemen and ladies like to walk in the garden, and see very beautiful 
flowers, and roses in the garden. They like to smell flowers, and roses. Good boys 
and girls love to rend and learn the Holy Bible, and they pray to God. The pupils 
often try to think and write composition on the slates, and they will understand to 
write. Two bad men and boys drank whisky. The men drank much whisky. 
They fought with each other. Some people laughed at the drunkards. C, A. D. 



87 

BY A YOUNG LADY EIGHTEEN YEARS OLP, OF TWO-AND-A-HALF YEARS ATTENOANCB. 

Last Thursday, 26th of November, we had thanksgiving. Many people Avent to 
the churches, but idle people did not go to the churches. Some of the pupils were 
, pleased to play with each other. We should feel thankful to God. 

About two years ago my parents went to Virginia, because my parents wished to 
see their mothers, and bif)thers and sisters, and cousins. My father and mother 
say they saw many negroes in Virginia. 

Mr. Willard's two oldest daughters attend school in Indianapolis. Miss E. White 
will not come to the Institution. Mr. Thomas Mac Intire is the Superintendent. He 
is kind to all the boys and girls. I will try to write well on the slate. Perhaps 
my friends will go to Columbus, Ohio. Good children love to play with each other. 
Careless boys and girls sometimes throw stones at the glass windows, and break 
them. 

Last summer a deaf and dumb man walked along the rail road track. He was 
careless, but he did not see any cars. After a while a locomotive suddenly knocked 
him o3" the track. He was much hurt, but a few kind people took him up and 
carried him into a house. After some weeks the injured man got well again.* He 
has returned to this Institution. L. A. S. 



ABOUT A HUNTER. 

BY A LAD FOURTEEN YEARS OLD, OF TWO-AND-A-HALF YEARS ATTENDANCE. 

Some years ago a hunter went into the woods, with a rifle. He called his hound 
dog, and the dog heard his master call him, and ran before the hunter. The hound 
dog ran, and smelt about the woods. The hunter found a fox squirrel, sitting on 
the top of a hickory tree. He fired at the squirrel, but missed it. The fox squirrel 
ran and jumped from branch to branch, and then he went and hid in his hole in 
the tree. The hunter reloaded his gun, and went among the woods looking up the 
trees, but he could not find the fox squirrel again. He went away to hunt for other 
game, and he heai'd his dog bark furiously at some distance. The hunter ran up 
to the place and found an old bear on a large old oak tree. He fired at the bear. 
The bullet passed through the bear's breast, and the bear fell down to the ground, 
and the hunter's dog went to tight with him. The hunter reloaded his gun, and 
fired at him a second time. The bear was killed, and the hunter cut oiF the bear's 
skin, and he carried the bear's meat home. The hunter's wife cooked the flesh for 
her hus )and and family at meals. E. W. B. 



ABOUT AN IRISHMAN. 

BY A LAD UNDER INSTRUCTION THREE YEARS. 

In the month of October an Irishman met my father at home. He asked my father 
if he wanted to hire him. My father told him that he would tell him in a day or 
80. In a day or so, the Irishman came again, and my father hired him to work. 
The Irishman liked to chew tobacco, so one day he chewed up all the tobacco he 
had, and he wanted more. One morning my father told him to go and work with 
me and my brother all the day, and he told him that he was going to the town, and 
then he took us to the woods, and he looked for a good log. He found one, and told 
us to cut it up for wood. When we began to work, the Irishman told my father to 
buy him some tobacco, and he said that he would. Then my father went home, and 
went to the town in a wagon. He hitched his horses to a post for a long time. He 
went about on business until afternoon, and then he came home. While he was 
gone, the Irishman needed tobacco very much, and he could not ivork well without 
chewing tobacco. Near noon we left the woods, and went home for our dinner, 
and' we then went into another room and the Irishman was very hungry for his 
tobacco, and desired so long, that he became tired as my father was late in coming 
home. The Irishman then asked my mother to let him to go to borrow some tobacco, 
and my mother said that he could go. He started and ran very fast down a hill, 
and at last he stumbled against a small log, and fell down into a small brook, and 
he got vei'y wet and dirty. He was ashamed and returned home again, and put on 
dry clothes, and went again to borrow tobacco, and as he was going he met a man, 
and asked him to lend him some tobacco. But the man said that he had not enough, 
but he said he would lend him a little, so the Irishman got just a little peace of to- 
bacco, returned home and worked until my father came home. J. M. A. 



WHEN I WAS A LITTLE BOY. 

BY A LAD UNDER INSTRUCTIONS THREE-AND-A-HALF YEARS. 

When I was three years and three months of age, I was very sick and became 
deaf and dumb. I did not know that I could speak and hear. My father or mother 
told me that I generally talked with other persons, before I was sick. I wondered 
because I had forgotten how to talk. I thought that other persons could talk. I 
tried to talk with them but they did not understand me. 

I thought that wheat and corn grew from the land themselves. It rained and 
they grew very fast. It was very wonderful. I thought that the rain fell from 
the sky. I did not know that God created the earth, but I thought that a man lived 
in the sky. 

I wondered to see the sky, and thought that smoke went from the chimneys up 
to the sky. I thought that the sun always moved round the earth, but the earth 
never moved. When I walked alone the sun always chased me. I thought that 
the sun did not look at other persons. It was very unjust because I was deaf and 



89 

dumb, and I ran fast and hid in the house. The sun could not see me. But I was 
ignorant. Many boys and girls could read and write in school. I could not learn 
to write. I thought that they read the books easily. I tried to read, but I could 
not understand. I thought there were no other deaf and dumb persons, but I wae 
the only one deaf and dumb person. W. V. A. 



OF THE CLOUDS AND RAIN. 

BY A LAD UNDER INSTRUCTION THREE-AND-A-HALF YEARS. 

The clouds float some distance above the surface of the earth, and are collections 
of vapor, and contain watery particles. The thin and lighter clouds often float 
above the summit of the highest mountains. The heavier clouds usually float with- 
in half of a mile above the earth and their color is often black, and by that persons 
often hope that rain may soon fall. 

We should not stand under trees while the clouds are above our heads because 
they are often full of electricity, and we might get thunder-struck. Trees are often 
struck by the electricity in cloudy weather. The electricity is very dangerous. 

The clouds are of some good use to us in shutting out the heat of the sun in hot 
days instead of umbrellas. Th^ clouds are more numerous in the hot regions, 
where the greatest quantity of water is evaporated by the sun from the great ocean. 
It seems delightful to look at the clouds moving over our heads, and they some- 
times seem to be going with great rapidity. 

Rain is formed in the atmosphere when the warm air is cooled. Drops of water 
fall to the earth by their own weight, and these are what we call rain. It rains 
more in hot countries than in others. In the torrid zone the rainy seasons are 
their winters, and the dry seasons are their summers. 

Rain is very useful to mankind and all living things. The rain makes the earth 
bring forth her fruits. If there were no rain then truly nothing would grow on 
the earth, and all living things would starve to death. In some countries it never 
rains, but the dew makes the corn, grass, and all things grow. The dew falls very 
much there and supplies the place of rain. The rain does not fall in a part of 
Peru and Chili, because there the wind blows always in one direction and does not 
cool the air enough to form rain, because of the Andes mountains. D. W. W. 



A BOY AND HIS DOG. 

'' ■ BY A LAD UNDER INSTRUCTION FOUR YEARS. . 

Once a rich man had a wife and little son. They called their son John. He 
became a large boy. He was a very wicked boy, because his rich parents indulged 
him. But his mother reproved John. He went to the town and he saw a littlt 

2 D. J.— 7. 



90 

black puppy. He stole it and carried it to his father's house. His father asked 
him how he got it. John told him that a gentleman gave it to him. He believed 
bim, but his mother thought he had stolen it from some of their neighbors. Another 
boy came to his mother when he saw it, and said it was his puppy. He told her 
that her son had stolen it. AVhen John heard of it, he took it up and hid it. His 
mother called him, but he lied to her. John told her that the puppy had run away. 
Sho knew that he was telling a lie. She would punish him. At night John took 
the puppy and went into the woods. He did not return home. He stole a gun and 
pistol. The puppy became a dog. He often fed it with meat. He made a log hut 
in the forest. He sometimes killed an Indian with his gun. His beard was grown. 
John wore »-deer or bear skin. He often played with his dog. 

This story is a tic lion. R. F. C. 



ABOUT MYSELF. 

BY A YOUNG MAN UNDER INSTRUCTION FOUR YEARS. 

In writing this description of my past days I have some curious things to tell 
you. I was not born deaf and dumb, but I could hear and talk until I was five 
years old. It once happened that my sister-in-law desired my parents to give me 
under her control, as her own brother. At that time I became very sick, and 
during a few months I laid on my bed very bad, and used no food. But the doctor 
attended me and gave me medicines. In the meantime I became deaf. After my 
recovery from sickness and weakness I was taken to a physician, and he attempted 
to bring me to my hearing again, but all in vain. 1 remained at home until I waa 
between fifteen and sixteen years of age, but I never had any satisfaction of con- 
versing with my friends, because I was ignorant and destitute of wisdom. I had 
but little understanding of any thing and it was impossible for me to gain knowl- 
edge in auy position. At that time the good news came to my parents about this 
institution and how the deaf and dumb could be taught by signs to read and write. 
My parents then decided on sending me to school. Not many days after that tima 
my parents furnished me with sufficient clothes, and sent me to the Indiana in- 
Btitutioa for the Deaf find Dumb. 

V.'hen I arrived at the Institution, I was amazed to see so many deaf and dumb 
boys standing gazing at me, and conversing by signs which were new and astou- 
i.shing to me. After a short time of my residence among the Deaf and Dumb, I 
becau/c accustomed to them and their signs of talking. I was at that time, the 
most ignorant pupil of my size. I was put in the lowest class, under the control 
and care of a generoug and kind teacher. I remained in his class one year, im- 
proved my time well and was thought by him to be his best pupil. My second year 
atUinding school was tolerably well passed, but (he third year some better. The 
fourth year, I sujjpose to be much better than all, because I find myself in a better 
and happier condition, i Lope to be in a more prosperous condition in old ago 
ihan at present. ,. ' W. H. H. C. 



91 

THE BIRDS. 

BY A LAD UNDEK INSTRUCTION FODR AND A HALF TEARS. 

In the summer the birds often sing sweetly. When wo arc in bed and in the 
morning, they sing and make us get up. Do not hurt them. Let them alone, and 
let them sing always. When it is winter, they feel unpleasant and chilly. What 
Bhall we do with them? Let them come in our house, let them stay till they are 
warm. AVhen the spring is coming what do the sweet birds do? They feel so 
happy and sing so sweetly; they do not look sad when the spring is coming. Some 
birds have a red breast, white on their heads, and yellow on their backs, they look 
60 pretty. , H. K. D. 



KNOWLEDGE. 

BY A LAD UNDER INSTRUCTION FOUR AND A HALF YEARS. 

Knowledge is power. A knowledge of everj-thing that is good should be had 
by every person, who wishes to qualify himself for a useful and prosperous lifa 
on earth. 

Knowledge is a curse to those who make bad use of it, and a blessing to those 
who do everything in their power to make the best of it. 

We are learning something every minute. We learn in two ways, namely, by 
reading and by observation. Many poor persons have not the chance to send their 
children to school, consequently they grow up in ignorance, in which state they 
remain till death. 

Many persons who possess great knowledge make bad use of it, and in conse- 
quence of this, never feel happy. 

All who wish to learn for evil purposes should abandon learning, because it is 
better to be ignorant, than to apply their knowledge to their own and other's injury. 

Learned persons meet with less dilBculty, than those who are uneducated, be- 
cause they know what is best to do. 

The number of schools is yearly increasing, and the privileges of obtaining an 
education at a trifling expense are numerous. 

This school is one of the benevolent institutions of the State. Indiana feels 
proud of her excellence among the civilized countries. Every deaf mute who 
wants an education, even if he be so very poor, is invited to eome and obtain it. 
We should be grateful to our Creator for prompting the hearts of the people to 
found 80 good an institution. Let every body devote their attention to study, for 
wisdom and knowledge are better than the costliest jewels. A. W. M. 



92 

INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

BY A GIRL UNDER INSTRUCTION FOUR AND A HALF TEARS. 

The Institution is large and beautiful. Tliere are five houses here. There are 
two buildings which are large and handsome. Many fine ti'ees stand in the yard. 
It is neat and level. The grass grows over it and it looks green and pleasant. 
There are many bushes and flowers growing in the yard. 

Mr. Thomas Mac Intire is the Superintendent. He attends to business, and 
keeps things in order. He has directed that all the pupils march in order to 
school. They are very orderly in marching together. They appear as well as 
soldiers. The superintendent is busy and works in his ofiice. 

There are about one hundred and fifteen pupils in the Institution, and they are 
increasing in number. There are eight teachers here. One teacher is in each 
room. The teachers must always teach the deaf and dumb pupils how to learn by 
signs and the alphabet. They generally improve and do right. They all under- 
stand how to learn and do many things. 

The pupils always go into school at nine o'clock, and stay until twelve o'clock. 
They all go out to dinner then, and they always go into school at one o'clock in the 
afternoon and remain until three o'clock. The girls sew until five o'clock, 
then they are all free. They stay and wait for supper at six o'clock. 

They always like to talk when they sit down at the desks in the study room. 
They all study their lessons every evening from seven o'clack until nine o'clock. 
Then they all retire to their beds for the night. They must always rise exactlj'' at 
five o'clock. They eat breakfast in the dining room at six. The girls sew in the 
morning a little while, when they are free until nine o'clock. 

They sew and make many articles for the Institution every morning and after- 
noon. They have no school every Saturday afternoon. Then they sew on their 
clothes, or play out of the house, or do anything for themselves. Every Sunday 
Mr. Mac Intire lectures to all the pupils in the chapel in the morning. A teacher 
lectoires in the afternoon. All the pupils must cheerfully obey the Superintendent, 
Matron, Steward, and other officers of the Institution. F. C. V. 



ABOUT MY EARLY DAYS. 

BY A YOUNG LADY UNDER INSTRUCTION FIVE YKARS. 

I was dwelling in a dear old home in tlie open country, about seven miles from 
the city of Lafayette, where grassy fields and fine trees grew in the summer, and 
where the snow used to pile high round our dwelling, and the winds blow so hard. 
The family group consisted of three brothers and four sisters, and our kind parents. 
What a happy time 1 had in ciiildhoodl we passed our time merrily, playing in tho 
fields and near the creeks. 

I will now tell you the cause of my deafness. Winter fever was the cause. 
Whea I was five years old rny parents went from home on a visit to their friends 



93 

in Lafayette. I was playing out in a very cold day. My brother was drawing me 
on a sledge. I took cold and lost my hearing. 

When I was fourteen years old I commenced to attend school, but I did not like 
it very well because I was with strangers. At last I loved them all. When, in 
July, my mother told me to prepare for school, I told her I felt sick and did not 
like to go to school any more, and my mother's heart was very tender to me. I 
Btaid at home a few days, but I was full of guilt and shame for what I had done. 
I confessed all to my mother and begged her to forgive me, and she was very will- 
ing to do so. I was very mischievous and troubled my mother", sisters and brothers 
very often. 

I will tell of my little brother's death. He was sick and unable to sit up and 
Boon after he died. All my folks were standing round the bed where my little 
brother lay. They were weeping around his dying bed. God took him away from 
this earth to the peaceful place where many angels are singing. I know that he ia 
with our Heavenly Father. He was three years of age when he left this earth. 

I. S. 



A LAUGHING STORY OF JACK. 



BY A LAD' UNDER INSTRUCTION FIVE YEARS. 



Jack came from the east to explore the western country before it was settled. 
He wandered about the northern part of the United States a long time. As he 
was wandering about, he found a beautiful place near a cave, Avhere he built a 
log-house in which he resided. He was alone, but he thought he could get some 
amusments. One day as he was traveling in the woods, he found a young bear, 
which he brought home and tamed. Soon after he went out hunting, and found a 
monkey which he brought home and tamed. Sometime afterward he again went 
out hunting. As he was walking along one side of a pond, he perceived a large 
bull-frog which was concealed among some weeds. He caught it, brought it home, 
and tamed it too. They lived very pleasantly in the log-house. One day Jack 
wanted to go out to work. So he chose the bear to take care of the house, and get 
a good dinner for him. Accordingly Jack went out to work with the bear and 
frog. The bear had the door fastened. While the bear was getting the dinner, a 
hairy man in the cave near the house, smelled the fumes of the frying meat and 
came out to the cabfti-door, but could not get in. He asked for permission to come 
in but the bear did not know who he was and refused to let him come in. At last 
the hairy man broke the door, went in, and knocked the bear down. 

The bear was afraid to scold him and therefore let him do as he pleased. He ate 
every thing on the table, then went out again. When Jack came home, he found 
nothing to eat and scolded the bear for letting the hairy man have all the things. 
The next day Jack chose the monkey to take care of the house, and said for him 
not to imitate the bear. As Jack went out to work with the bear and frog, the 
monkey began to get a good dinner, but the hairy man came again and asked for 
permission to come in but was refused. He broke the door again. He knocked 



94 

the monkey down, and ate all the things on the table. Then went out again. 
When Jack came home, he was sorry to find nothing to oat and accused the 
monkej- of imitating the bear. The next day Jack choose the frog to take care of 
the house. When Jack went out to work with the bear and monkey, the cunning 
fro"' began to get a good dinner. As he was getting the dinner, the hairy man 
came out again, and asked for permission to come in, but the frog danced and said 
that he could not come in. The hairy man got very angry, broke the door and 
went in. He wondered to see such a small thing and tried to stamp on him, but 
the frog was too cunning for him. The hairy man thought that the frog would not 
hurt him, and sat down to eat, but the frog jumped on the table, and jumped in 
every dish on the table. The hairy man was much troubled, despised the frog, and 
picked up a fork to kill him; but as he was going to stab him, the frog jumped 
from the table into a pile of cold ashes. The hairy man wondered what he was 
doing there and got up to see. As he was raking the ashes away, the cunning 
frog jumped up and the hairy man's eyes were filled with ashes, so he could hardly 
see, he went under the bed in the house full of cowardice. The cunning frog 
jumped on the bed, danced and sang for a while. When Jack came near his house, 
he heard the frog singing, and rn.n to see what Avas the matter. After learning 
about the hairy man, he sat down to eat his dinner. As soon as he got done, he 
took his gun, and shot the hairy man, and dragged him into his own cave. Jack 
honored the cunning frog, and made him the housekeeper forever afterward. 

W. M. F. 



NAAMAN. 



BY A liAD UNDER INSTRUCTION FIVE YEARS. 

The King of Syria had appointed a captain named Naaman, over all his army. 
Naaman was very rich, and his master loved and honored him because he was very 
bold, and fought his battles for him. So Naaman had much to make him happy, 
but tliorn TV-IS only one stran;T? thing which spoiled his enjoyments and pleasures. 
What was the matter with him? He was a leper! No medicine could cure hia 
leprosy, or cleanse him. Only the Lord God could take it away fi'om him. Poor 
Naaman! His leprosy made him very unhappy and sad, and he wished that he 
could be well. Indeed I believe that there is always something in the world to 
hinder the people from being perfectly happy. They cannot liave all that they 
want. If tliey liad all the riches of the world, still there would be something to 
vex them. M;uiy dilfercut kinds of dreadful diseases spoil their worldly joys. 
There are a great many people who love worldly things so much they feel disap- 
pointed, but God can give them real joy which will never pass away. But Naaman 
was grossly ignorant of tlie truth of God. He was an idolater. The ruler of 
Syria and his people worshipped false gods, and knew notliing of God. Naaman 
was sick and sorrowful. He had nothing to comfort him. After sometime the 
people of Syria made a war against the Israelites, and among the captives was an 
IsraelitiKli f.*;!!!. They brought Ikm- to Syria. It was very sad for the girl to bo 



95 

taken from her parents to an idolatrous country, where there was no holy temple, 
nor priests, nor sacrifices, nor prophets. The same girl was taken by Naaman to 
his house. She waited upon his wife. I believe that she was a very gentle and 
obedient girl, and always tried to please her master and mistress, and was respect- 
ful and kind to them, and they were not slow to love and be kind to her. The 
little girl was very sorry to see her master suffering so much that no medicine nor 
physician could cure him, she wished that she could help him. Then she recalled 
to memory, Elisha the prophet, and all the miracles that he had done. She ex- 
plained to her mistress about Elisha, who could cleanse lepers. Her mistress sent 
and told Naaman what the maid had said. He was so glad to hear that he could 
be cured, that he made ready his chariot and servants, and went to Samaria. 
They came to Elisha's house. Naaman was a proud man, and he wanted Elisha 
to show him honor. The prophet did not go out to see him, but he sent one of his 
servants with a message that he should wash seven times in the river Jordan. 
Naaman turned and went away in a great rage. Why? Because he thought that 
the prophet had not honored him. Naaman's servants advised him to go and wash 
seven times in Joi-dan, and sec what would happen. He went to Jordan and 
washed seven times, and the leprosy left him and he was cleansed. He was exceed- 
ingly glad, and went to Syria a.;Tain. W. M. Y. 



EDUCATION. 

BY A YOtJNQ MAN, UXDER IXSTRUCTION SIX THARS. 

Education comprises all the sequences of instruction, cultivation, and improve- 
ment which propose to correct the due mixture of various qualities of and form the 
aptitudes and manners of the youth. In youth, we ought to obtain education, and 
it is an important matter for us to lay up knowledge in that time, that we may be 
happy and act wisely in old age. God has given us minds which are curious 
things, and capable of endless progression in knowledge, and we ought to fee\ 
deCjjly thankful to him, aud also we ought not to neglect a moment in cultivating 
them. There are many persons who love to attend, with more pleasure, to foolish 
and lively stories which are full of defamatory aspersions, reproachful reports, wit, 
&c., than to wise and proper discourses that tell about truth, and moral goodness. 
They seem to think nothing of the importance of good instructions and advices of 
older persons. It is vei-itable that no one can gain knowledge without close and 
steady application to study. It is of great utility to us to have a practical knowl- 
edge of sciences, &c. There are many thoughtless young persons who idle away 
their leisure hours recklessly. It is a great mistake. 

We ought to occupy our leisure time in roading useful books, and improving the 
mind. In old age, how would a man feel, if he had carelessly neglected to culti- 
vate his mind, while he was in his youth. I assure you he would feel very sad. 
It is conformable to fact, that, in the attention of man, the most useful point is to 
gain a practical knowledge of his own essential qualities, and the next to find out 
the way, in which his constitution, that is both of the body and mind, may be most 



96 

profitably employed. Every person may find that education is inestimable, and 
great profit can be, without difficulty, derived from it, by him who is able to under- 
stand the greatness of its principles. It is profitable for every person to spend his 
youth in gaining knowledge in every division of science, literature, &c. Those 
who are passionately fond of knowledge, will gain it, unless they become tired of 
endeavoring diligently in pursuing useful studies and averse to them. Those who 
will never strive to improve their minds, will never acquire any knowledge, and if 
they continue in neglecting the improvement of the mind until their ends on this 
earth, they will die in their ignorance. P. N. N. 



HELEN. 



BY A TOUNa LADY, UNDER INSTRUCTION SIX YEARS. 

I once knew a husband and wife. They were pious and belonged to the Methodist 
church. They had a child named Helen. It was very pretty, with blue eyes, 
bright curly hair, and rosy cheeks. 

When she was four years old her parents began to teach her about the goodness 
of God. They told her that he made and keeps all things, and that she ought to 
love and obey him always. They taught her the commandments, and how to pray, 
and constantly tried to lead her in the way of rigliteousness. Their instructions 
were not lost on her. She soon began to understand and try to please them. 

She remained at home till nine years of age. There was no good school for her 
there. One day a man came to her father's house and proposed taking her home 
with him. He was a teacher, and kept an excellent school in a neighboring town. 
Her parents, with some hesitation, consented. She was quite young, but they be- 
lieved the teacher would take good care of her. She was sorry to leave her good 
home, and kind parents for strangers. 

When ready to go, her mother told her to remember and practice all the good 
advice she had given her. Helen promised to do so, and with many kisses, de- 
parted. On entering school she found all so strange she could hardly speak to 
them. But in a short time she became acquainted with her mates and interested 
in her studies. She was placed in a primary class, under the care of a female 
teacher. She loved Helen very much because she was so obedient, and docile. 
Sometimes some of the girls tried to persuade her to play with them on Sunday or 
in study hours, but she never yielded to their wishes. She associated with the 
good girls. 

During her stay at school she made rapid iiuprovemeut because of her care and 
industry. When her fathci' came to tijjie her home at vacation she was very glad, 
and he and her mother were also glad. Thus it is that good children make their 
parents happy. , M. A. L. 



97 

PLEASANT THINGS. 

BT A YOUiNG LADY, UM)KR INSTRUCTION SIX YEARS. 

Last spring I admired the verdure, covered witli sliining dew-drojis in the morn- 
ing. The trees were adorned witli green leaves which seemed very beautiful. The 
air was full of the sweet songs of the spring birds. I think all kinds of birds 
never forget to praise God by singing. A few years before my deafness, I some- 
times rambled alone in the woods, by a stream of water; sometimes leaned against 
a large cotton-wood tree to listen to the cooing of doves, and the warbling of other 
birds. The woods were adorned with many beautiful tlowers growing along near 
the stream. Its banks were fringed with a variety of trees, the bright green 
foliage of which delighted the eye of the beholder. When I was tired by a ramble 
longer than usual, I sat down on the bank of the twittering stream, among the 
delightful, deep obscm-ities of the woods, which difl'used coolness and invited me 
to rest. From my seat I could see the brook coursing its way along between the 
rocks, glittering, as it reflected the sun's rays, like a pathway of light. My ears 
were filled with the murmur of the running water; birds flew about in the air 
singing sweetly. Many thousands of insects sported in the air, or crawled upon 
the ground. All these made a continual hum which seemed never to cease. But 
winter laid its icy hand upon nature, and all her sweet voices were hushed as if in 
death. So the hand of disease touched me and I became a "silent one." Spring 
will return— revive — recall nature's gay children, and restore what winter has 
despoiled. I live in hopes of that Spring which will change this mortal to im- 
mortal — this imperfect to perfect, and I shall rejoice in full possession of all my 
mental and physical powers. M. A. E. 



CAPACITIES OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

s BY A SEMl-lIUTE, UNDER INSTRUCTION SIX YEARS AND A HALF. 

There are many classes of unfortunate people in the world; among wliich, in a 
superior degree are classed the Deaf and Dumb. They attract more pity and sym- 
pathy than any other grade of afflicted beings. 

The manner in which they are taught, has already been described by one, whose 
mind, while almost a blank, was enlightened by means of symbolic and arbitrary 
signs, and whose turn it is now to remove the film from the mind of others, whoi 
like himself are deprived of Heaven's choicest blessings — Hearing and Speech. 

And now, what renmins to be done, to do tluit unfortunate class justice, is to 
describe some of their capacities.^ — to explain the extent of their understanding, — 
and tell how in the end they are well qualified to mingle with the world in any 
sort of career. 

From appearances we would think a deaf mfiie devoid of all understanding, but 
the saying is true that we sliould "never judge from appearances." The mute, 
with all his silence and unconsciousness, is capable (in some instances) of achiev- 
ing wonders. There is a treasui •,> liid in a casket of axnius, that is of infinite use 



98 

to him. lie can jiulcce from the appearances of others, — is enabled to know when 
he pleases, and when he displeases. This endowment is, in all probability a re- 
compense for the loss of heaving, and a deficiency in the powers of articulation. 
Perhaps ?omc may style it a sort of suspicion, but, on considering the matter de- 
liberately, others will be read)' to admit that it is no such disposition. Every one 
knows that the variations of the features is the chief study of the mute. When 
they are the subject of any conversation they are quick to perceive it. The term 
"Hawk-eyed" might with propriety be applied to them, for it is truly astonishing 
to see how they can understand from looks and actions. When anything melan- 
choly happens, they are aware of it before they are told, the features tell plainly 
enough — just so with glad tidings. 

When a mute first enters school, he is ignorant of the rudiments of learning. 
Luring the first two or three weeks of schooling, he is incapable of conveying an 
idea of anything, but where the alphabet is learned, and a few words (such as the 
names of common and domestic articles, along with cuts and engravings) are 
Btudied, and an explanation given, then the door of the mind seems to be opening. 

Gradually, and by degrees, though during long intervals, he acquires a knowl- 
edge of coiumou things, and, in the course of a year or two, liiS mind is sufficiently 
enlarged to admit thoughts of higher importance. 

He thinks there is a God — a Heaven and a Hell, and bcUeves it, and knows th« 
difference between right and wrong. He begins to study difficult works, and when 
he has gone through his full course, graduates with as good an education, as any 
common school affords, and is ready to learn any trade by which he may earn a 
living, and may become a fit ornament for societj^, and mingle therein. 

As regards their understanding, many it is true, have but a limited extent, yet 
there are many Avho are capable of understanding the hardest kind of study. One 
who was educated in New York, and graduated witli the highest honors, was suffi- 
ciently learned to be appointed State Geologist of Maine. Another became an ac- 
tive member in a Southern Legislature, and many more have been appointed to 
high, and respectable positions in life. 

So the pains which those good men took who lived in days a-gone, have not 
proved unavailing. They have been the means of leading many from a state of 
utter ignorance and barbarism, to the highest social positions in existence, an.d, 
above all, to the God that made them. C. U. S. 



E U L E S 



FOR THE 



ADMISSION OF PUPILS, &C. 



I. All the Deaf and Dumb of the State, between the ages of ten and twenty-one 
years, are entitled to an education-, without charges for board or tuition, in this In- 
stitution, upon compliance with the Rules. No certificate of any kind is required 
for admission. Persons, however, desirous of placing a pupil in the school, should 
write to the Superintendent, informing him of the name, age, residence of the 
mute, the cause, if known, of deafness, &c. The Superintendent will immediately 
answer, stating the time when the pupil will be received. This course is in all 
cases recommended, though none will be refused who come at the commencement of 
the session. Applications in behalf of persons of more or less than the required 
age, will be considered by tlie Trustees, who reserve to themselves the right to 
accept or reject such applicants, as they may deem just and proper. 

II. Pupils from other States are receivRl at the rate of one hundred dollars per 
session of ten months, for board and tuition. 

III. The length of the course of instruction is five years; and, that the pupils 
may become more proficient in their studies, they are allowed and advised to remain 
one year longer. At the end of six years, the Sujjerintendcnt may select such 
pupils as he may consider would be particularly benefitted by continuing longer at 
school, and, if approved of by the Board of Ti-ustees, they shall be permitted to 
remain an additional year. 

IV. Pupils will be admitted on the following conditions: 1st. The pupil, well 
provided with clothes, is to be brought to the Asylum punctually at the commence- 
ment of each session, for the period of five years, unless detained at home by his or 
her sickness. 2d. The pupil is to remain in the school until the liJth day of July 
of each year. 3d. No parent or guardian shall be allowed to take a pupil out of 
the school without the consent of the Board of Trustees. 



100 

V. It is the intention of the Trustees to render the Institution self-supporting, 
80 far as practicable, and that every pupil, on leaving its v^alls, shall be bo pro- 
ficient in some useful occupation or trade, as to be able to procure a livelihood, 
without reliance on the charities of others. In accordance with this design, all the 
scholars will be required to labor a portion of each day, the girls in performing the 
lighter kinds of housework, and in various kinds of needle-work, as plain sewing, 
ornamental work, dress making or millinery, &c.; and the boys at various trades, 
the necessary work about the Asylum, and the cultivation of the farm and garden. 

VI. The annual sessions of the school continue ten months, commencing on the 
15th day of September, and closing on the 15th day_of July. Every pupil is to come 
promptly on or before the first day of the session, and is to remain until the last day of the 
tame. The only exceptions allowed are cases of sickness. 

VII. No pupil, unless under extraordinary circumstances, can be received at 
any other time than the commencement of the session. 

VIII. Parents and guardians are required to furnish annually to each pupil, 
the following supply of clothing: 

FOR MALE PUPILS. 

WINTER CLOTHING. 

2 Coats, 5 paii's of Socks, 

2 Vests, 1 pair of Boots, 

2 pairs of Pantaloons, 2 pairs of Shoes, 

6 Shirts, 2 Hats, or 1 Hat and 1 Cap. 

BUMMER CLOTHING. 

2 Coats, 2 pairs of Pantaloons, 

2 Vests, 1 Palm-leaf Hat. 

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES. 

1 Ivory Comb, >2 pairs of Suspenders, 

2 pairs of Wooden Combs, 2 pocket Handkerchiefs. 

FOR THE FEMALE PUPILS. 

3 or 4 Calico Dresses, 2 pairs of Summer Stockings, 
1 Woolen or Worsted Dress, 2 pairs of Winter Stockings, 

1 Sundiiy and 1 Sun Uonnct, 2 Kight Gowns, 

2 or 3 changes of underclothing, 3 pairs of Shoes. 
2 Pocket naudkerchlers, 

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES, 

1 Shawl, 2 Hair Combs, 1 Coarse and 2 Ivory Combs. 

In addition to the above out-fit, a sum of not less than f3 00 is to be dci^ositcd 
■with the Superintendent foi- incidental expenses, repairs of shoes, &c.; any part of 
which remaining unexpended, will be returned at the close of the session. 



101 

It is not intended that the clothing should beef an expensive kind. For boya' 
winter apparel, plain home-made cloth is sufficiently good. For summer wear, 
country linen will answer for pants, with some kind of dark goods or prints for 
coats and vests. Girls' calico dresses may be made of a cheap article which will 
not fade; and while for older girls, at least, one pair of morocco shoes should be 
furnished, one or both of the other pair should be of good calf-skin. On all articles 
of clothing which it is possible to mark, the full name of the pupil should be writ^ 
ten with indelible ink. Each pupil should be supplied with a trunk or a chest. 

IX. Pupils can be furnished with clothing in the Institution, only in accordance 
with the following Legislative enactment: 

"That when the patients of the Hospital for the Insane, and pupils of the In- 
stitute for the Blind and Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb are not otherwise sup- 
plied with clothing, they shall be furnished by the proper Superintendent, who 
shall make out an account therefor, in each case, against the respective counties 
from which said patients and pupils were sent, in an amount not exceeding twenty 
dollars per annum for every such patient, which account shall be signed by the 
Superintendent and attested by the seal of the Hospital, Institute for the Blind, 
or Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, as the case may be, and the Treasurer of State 
shall charge the account thus certified to the county from which the patient was 
sent, and credit the amount to the current expense fund of the Indiana Hospital 
for the Insane, Institute for the Blind, and Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb.'' 

''Sec. 3. When such certified account shall be received by e Treasurer of (he 
proper county, to whom it shall be immediately sent upon its reception by the 
Treasurer of State from such Superintendent, such county Treasurer shall cause 
the same to be paid out of the county Treasury to the Treasurer of State. And 
such county Treasurer shall collect the amount of such account from the estate of 
such patient, or pupil, if he have any, by suit, if necessary, in the name of the 
county: Provided, That if such patient or pupil have a family, at least five hun- 
dred dollars of his property shall be exempt from the payment of such account. 
And suit for the collection of such account may be commenced in the county to 
which the account is certified, but the Court in which it is instituted, shall appoint 
a guardian ad litum for such patient or pupil- and if he have a wife, shall cause at 
least twenty days' notice of the commencement of such suit, to be given her in 
writing. And no other notice of such suit, except as herein provided, shall be 
required." 

X. Those persons bringing pupils to, or taking them away, cannot be furnished 
with board, lodging, or horse-keeping, at the Asylum. 

XI. All business letters, or letters of inquiry in regard to pupils in the Asylum, 
or those whom it may be designed to place there, should be addressed to "Thomas 
Mac Intire, Superintendent Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Indianapolis." All 
letters for pupils must be pre-paid, and contain the words, ^'^ Institution for the 
Deaf and Dumb," as part of their direction. 



102 



MANUAL ALPHABET AND NUMERALS 



D 




A| f 








Ef!f 




I i 







^jBlsatMi'tiij^ 



G 







N ID 





103 



FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 





U 







(ft t" ? 



^^|l 



w 



r-' 



& 







*fi 










im 



Doc. Ko. 3.] [Part II. 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



COMMISSIONERS AND SUPERINTENDENT 



OF THE 



INDIANA HOSPITAL FOR INSANE, 



FOE THE YEAR EKDING OCT. 31, 1857 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



I N I ) I A X A P L I S : 

JOSEPa J. TvIXGlIAM, STATE PRINTER. 

1857. 
2 D. J.— 8 



OFFICERS OF THE HOSPITAL, 1857, 



COMMISSIONERS, 

W. H. TALBOTT, President. 
JAMES RITCHEY, ' 
EDWIN J. TECK, 
HENRY BRADY, 
SAMUEL GRIMES, 
C. C. CAMPBELL. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



SUPERINTENDENT, 

JAMES S. ATHON, M. D. 

ASSISTANT PHYSICIANS, 

GEO. A. TORBET, M. D. 
HENRY F. BARNES, M. D. 

STEWARD, 

MOSES HUNTER. 

MATRON, 

Miss ELEANOR LEA. 



REPORT. 



To His Excellency, A. P. Willard, 

Governor of the State of Indiana : 

By the provisions of the law, the Commissioners of the Indi- 
ana Hospital for the Insane, at their annual meeting, are required 
to make a full report to the General Assembly. As this body, 
by constitutional provision, meets but biennially, by a subsequent 
enactment the Commissioners were required to report to the 
Governor in the alternate year, when the Assembly is not in 
session. With this legal obligation, we very cheerfully and re- 
spectfully comply. We herewith also submit the reports of the 
Superintendent and Treasurer, both of which we earnestly 
recommend to your most serious consideration. 

Since our last report, and just as he was about to enter upon 
another year's service, the esteemed i'resident of our Board, the 
Hon. H. F. W^EST, was removed frt)m among us, and his place 
made vacant, by Him who holds the destinies of men and of na- 
tions in His hands. It is not our purpose to pass any eulogy 
upon his character, but merely to allude to the death of an offi- 
cial associate, with whom we had always held pleasant and gen- 
tlemanly intercourse, in suitable and becoming terms. 

This is the lirst removal by death which has occurred, either 
in the Board of Commissioners, or among the principal officers 
of the Hospital, since its opening. It is indeed wonderful that 
60 many as have been connected with the management of this 
Institution should have been so long spared ; and we feel bound 
to acknowledge our fervent gratitude to the Giver of all Good 
for that special favor which has preserved the lives of those en- 
trusted with its oversight. 

Our last report was made to the General Assembly. That 
Honorable Body was asked for large appropriations for the two 



110 

years then next succeeding — for the payment of some arrear- 
ages — for current expenses for two years — and for funds to erect 
and complete the north wing of the Hospital, according to the 
original design, and to make the building symmetrical. Besides 
all this, it was stated in our last and several preceding reports, 
that such is the rapid increase of our population, and so potent 
are the influences which tend to produce insanity among us, that 
even if the Hospital were completed, with both its north and 
south wings extended for the accommodation and treatment of 
the unfortunate insane, we would not then be able to afford pro- 
tection and relief to one-third of the miserable beings in our 
State, whose deplorable condition so urgently demands it. When 
completed, the Indiana Hospital will only accommodate about 
three hundred patients, while from reliable statistics it appears 
that there are some thirteen hundred insane persons within our 
commonwealth. With these startling facts before us, our morti- 
fication was extreme when we learned that the Legislature had 
failed to make any provision whatever for the support of the 
Hospital, or for the thousand other patients, who can have no 
proper treatment for this ivorst of all maladies. 

The Constitution of Indiana pro"\ddes that the Legislature shall 
provide for the support of her benevolent institutions, and that 
no money shall be drawn from the treasury but under appropri- 
ations made by law. The members of each branch of the Gene- 
ral Assembly take an oath to support the constitution. With 
such obligations, to say nothing of claims arising from common 
humanity, it could not have been apprehended that any conside- 
ration or casualty could occur to prevent the carrying out of 
these wise and salutary provisions. And yet it has been done. 
It is not our purpose to designate the persons or the party who 
were guilty of this great wrong ; but we do feel impelled by a 
i^ense of duty, both as men and as oflicers, to declare that we 
deprecate that intensity and malevolence of party spirit, which 
would stop the wheels of government, or trample upon the prin- 
dples upon v^hich it is based, to avoid a temporary defeat, or gain 
a transient victory. Every man should feel that the success of 
his party is not the highest good to be attained, and that there 
are interests above all i)arty considerations, as all have felt who 
have had the management of the Hospital within the past year. 



Ill 

With some two hundred and sixty patients ah-eady in, and others 
making urgent application for admission — without the appropri- 
ation of a dollar by the Legislature, and positively forbidden to 
borrow money for the support of the Institution — -we were reluc- 
tantly compelled to close it, and return upon the counties the mis- 
erable beings who were undergoing treatment. No tongue can 
tell, and no accountant calculate, the amount of injury done to 
these doubly unfortunate suiferers. Scores of those who, under 
judicious treatment in the Hospital, might have been restored to 
reason, to their families, and their country, have by reason of its 
abandonment been sent home, where no adequate provision could 
be made for them, no suitable medical attention afforded, and 
have become incurable, and therefore doomed to drag out the 
miserable remnant of their days in hopeless insanity. 

And here let it not be forgotten, that the previous Legislature 
had levied a tax for the support of the benevolent institutions, 
that the people had cheerfully paid it, and that the treasury was 
full. But not a dollar could be drawn, on account of the failure 
of the appropriation bill. 

No censure could be laid upon the Treasurer, as he was acting 
in conformity with both the constitution and his oath of office. 

Under these circumstances, the Commissioners felt that there 
was but one remedy to which they could resort, to avert the im- 
pending evil. The constitution vested the Governor with the 
power to convene the Legislature in an emergency. We felt that 
this w^as an emergency, and accordingly we met, in conjunction 
with the Trustees of the other institutions, and besought execu- 
tive interposition. Your Excellency refused to convene the 
Legislature, and we were driven to the only alternative left us — 
that was, to disband the Institution, and send the patients to 
tlieir respective counties. It was not, however, until we had 
twice besought your Excellency to convene the General Assem- 
bly, that we resolved upon this wretched alternative. Accord- 
ingly we issued the following circular, viz.: 

THE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE CLOSED. 

At a meeting of the Board of Commissioners of the Indiana 
Hospital for the Insane, held at Indianapolis, on Friday, the 3d 



112 

of April, 1857, the following circular was addressed to tlie clerks 
of the several counties of the State of Indiana: 

In consequence of the failure of the necessary appropriation 
bills, no money can be drawn from the treasury for the support 
of this Institution beyond the first inst. A most painful and 
unpleasant duty, therefore, devolves upon the Commissioners and 
Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane. 

We are compelled to give you notice that the Insane can no 
longer be supported in the Hospital, but must therefore be re- 
turned to the counties from which they were sent. 

The following preamble and resolutions were unanimously 
adopted : 

Whereas, The funds heretofore appropriated to support this 
Institution to the first of April, 1857, are exhausted, and the 
statutes positively forbid the Treasurer of State to advance to, 
or the Board of Commissioners to borrow money for the support 
of the Institution, therefore, 

Resolved, That the Superintendent be directed to give imme- 
diate notice to the clerks of the several counties, to remove their 
patients from the said Institution with as little delay as possible. 

HENRY BRADY, 

President 'pro tern. 

James S. Athon, 

Superiiitendent and Secretary. 

The return of so many insane persons, in so short a period, 
produced a profound sensation in every part of the State, filling 
the hearts of many wdth consternation and alarm. Everywhere 
the most painful apprehensions were excited. Many were re- 
moved from the neat and comfortable apartments of the Hospital 
to the loathsome cells of a prison or poor house, while others 
were committed to the care of relatives or friends, who were 
unable to restrain their actions and movements, and thus they 
roamed abroad, carrying terror and dismay wherever they ap- 
peared. In some counties their jails were full of persons charged 
with the cominlHsion of crirae, while in others they were inse- 
cure. A few of the Boards doing county business took up the 
subject, and proposed to the ofiicers of the Hospital to return 
•their patients, and support them there at the expense of the 



113 

county. Au ofier of this kind was made by the Commissioners 
of Marion, and one or two other counties. 

Whereupon the President of our Board called us together, to 
consider these propositions. The Board accordingly met, and 
after mature consideration, and with the hope and belief ex- 
p)'essed on the part of a majority, that most of the counties 
would enter into the arrangement, the propositions were acceded 
to, and the following circular was issued: 

^ Indiana Hospital for the Insane, \ 

Indianapolis, April 21, 1857. / 

At a called meeting of the Board of Commissioners of the 
Institution, convened by the President thereof, for the purpose 
of taking into consideration the proposition of Marion and other 
counties which have, or may ask that their insane shall be re- 
ceived into the Hospital at the expense of said counties for sup- 
port and treatment. 

The Board would most respectfully, after mature considera- 
tion, state, that there is no law authorizing the admission or re- 
tention of patients on such terms. Whether patients are kept 
and treated here or not, it is the duty of the Board to take care 
of the Hospital and all the property belonging to it and culti- 
■ vate the farm. To do so, the officers and a portion of the at- 
tendants must be retained. 

Under these circumstances, and in view of the necessity of 
the case, and the urgent demands reaching us from county 
Boards ajd private individuals, the Commissioners have con- 
cluded to consent to the reception of patients uutil the authori- 
ties of the State furnish the means for supporting the Institu- 
tion as provided by law, upon the following terms, viz: 

1. The patients must be sent in conformity with the law upon 
that subject. 

2. The county or counties, or individuals must pay the ad- 
ditional expense of the Institution for the treatment and main- 
tenance of such patients, including the salaries of the Assistant 
Physicians, and wages of attendants. 

3. The estimate for the support of any patient shall be made 
by the Superintendent, and sent to the county or counties, or 
individuals as the case may be, when responding to their appli- 



114 

cation, and upon the deposit of the amount with the President 
of the Board, monthly in advance, the Superintendent is directed 
to receive or retain such patient for support and treatment. 

4. Upon withholding the amount at the commencement of 
every month, the patient shall be returned to the proper county 
at once according to law. 

W. H. TALBOTT, 

President of the Board. 
James S. Athon, 

Svperintendent and Secretary. 

This arrangement, however, did not work as well as the ma- 
jority had predicted and expected. But few counties or indi- 
viduals were willing to incur the expense of supporting their 
patients or friends out of their own treasury or purse, especially 
after they had contributed their portion to the State revenue for 
that purpose, and while that was lying idly in the State Treas- 
ury and liable to loss or depreciation. So few fell in with the 
plan that the expense was very great compared w4th what it 
would have been, had all or most of them acceded to the terms 
proposed. The average number treated in the Hospital, under 
what we have termed the county arrangement, was but about 
thirty, and it may not be improper to state that, although Mari- 
on county had first proposed the arrangement, her Commission- 
ers never sent nor supported a patient under it. If all had en- 
tered into it heartily the expense could not have been much 
great;er than under the lawful method for supporting the same 
number. This experiment was fairly and faithfully tried for five 
mouths and in the most- favorable part of the year, and we may 
safely say utterly failed to satisfy either the officers of the Hos- 
pital or the public. The number in the Hospital was about to 
be lessened, which would have increased the cost of supporting 
the remainder, and would soon have led to the abandonment of 
this eftbrt to carry on the Institution. 

In a council of State officers it was resolved to furnish money 
from the State Treasury to open up and carry on all the State 
Benevolent Institutions. On being officially notified of your 
deteniiination, our l^tard were specially called together and 
issued this circular. 



115 

Indiana Hospital fok Insane, ) 
Indianapolis, Sept. 22, 1857. j 

To the Clerks of the several Counties of the State of Indiana: 

The officers of State having given us assurances that monej 
may be drawn from the State Treasury to support the Indiana 
Hospital for the Insane until the meeting of the legislature, the 
Board of Commissioners are gratified to announce, and they 
hereby give notice that from and after the fifth day of October 
next, this Institution shall be open for the reception of patients 
according to law. By order of the Board, 

HEl^RY BRADY, 

President pro. tern. 
James S. Athon, 

Superintendent and Secretary. 

Since the time specified in this circular the wards of the Hos- 
pital have been gradually filling up. It would probably before 
this have been filled to its utmost capacity had all been received 
for whom application was made. 

The Commissioners are vested with legal authority to dis- 
criminate in the selection of patients. It is a well established 
fact that of recent cases a much greater proportion may be cured,, 
than of those more chronic. As there were so few in the Hos- 
pital, and as there are so many more insane persons in the State 
than can be accommodated in its wards, we have felt it to be 
our duty to select from the number such cases as afibrd the 
fairest prospect of being benefited by hospital treatment. When 
not one-third of the insane can obtain admittance it is obviously 
the dictate of sound policy as well as of humanity, to admit such 
as are most readily and certainly curable, so that they may the 
sooner give place to others, and that the greatest good to the 
greatest number may be secured. In the course of years there 
had accumulated a large proportion of chronic cases which it was 
difficult to either cure or send away. By the act of our official 
superiors the Hospital got rid of these at once, and we are not 
anxious to see it again filled up with such a class. From con- 
siderations of this kind the Hospital is filling up less rapidly, 
but we trust that the temporary delay will result in the accom- 
plishment of far greater good to a greater number ultimately. 



116 ' 

For valuable statistical information respecting the number of 
patients treated in the Hospital during the year, the number 
cured, discharged or remaining in the Institution, together with 
a statement of everything connected with its internal manage- 
ment, we most respectfully refer you to the elaborate report of 
our able Superintendent. 

No change has been made in the corps of resident officers of 
the Hospital, except that of the Matron and Steward, since our 
last report. Miss Lea succeeds Mrs. Jane Gr. Shinier and Mose;* 
Hunter takes the place of Mr. Isaac H. Shimer as steward. 

We feel that we are bestowing no unmerited compliment 
when we declare that during the whole year every officer has 
Beemed anxious to discharge his whole duty. So far as we can 
ascertain, their deportment to each other, to the attendants and 
patients and to strangers has been kind, courteous and gentle- 
manly. Our connection with every officer and attendant has 
been of the most agreeable character. 

With the earnest desire that the Hospital may continue to in- 
crease in size and usefulness, and that others like it or surpassing 
it may be erected in due time in diflerent parts of the State, un- 
til there cannot be found an insane person within her bounds, 
for whose cure and comfort the most ample provision has not 
been made, we most respectfully subscribe ourselves your obedi- 
eHt servants. 

W. H. TALBOTT, Pres. 
E. J. PECK, 
HENRY BRADY, 
SAMUEL GRIMES, M. D. 
C. C. CAMPBELL, 
JAMES RITCHEY, M. D. 



SUPERINTENDENTS^ REPORT. 



To the Board of Commissioners : 

Gentlemen : — Since our last annual report, many unpleasant 
circumstances have supervened in connection witli our charge, 
which have very materially retarded and interfered in the care 
and treatment of the insane. 

The cause which led to the discharge of three hundred and three 
patients on the 3d of April last, arrested the cure, and consigned 
at least sixty human heings to perpetual mental darkness and 
physical misery, who otherwise might now be enjoying their 
proper faculties in full exercise, for the support of themselves 
and families. 

This is not the only injury done those patients who were dis- 
charged and sent home, many of whom, you are aware, were 
improving, and although very little hopes were entertained of 
effecting a cure, there was however every reason to believe that 
they would have been benefited by prolonged treatment, and 
thereby in many instances rendered capable of maintaining 
themselves, instead of being a tax, as they now are, upon their 
friends and neighbors, as well as a terror to both. 

The whole number of patients submitted to treatment during 
the year was three hundred and iiinety-five. Of this number two 
hundred and four were discharged unimproved, sixty-three im- 
proved, forty-nine cured, eight have died, and seventy-one remain 
in the Hospital. 

Every patient who was in the Hospital, or at home on a visit, 
was discharged by order of your Board, on the 3d day of April. 
The whole number of discharges was three hundred and three. 

The number of reported cases this year, compared with pre- 
vious years, is meager indeed ; but the cause of this meagerness 
is too apparent to you to require from us any explanation. 



118 

There were one hundred and seventy-eight applications, and one 
hundred and sixty admissions, during the year. There were at 
least a score of informal applications. These were made by per- 
sons who were acquainted with the condition of the Hospital, 
and who were indisposed to incur expense, unless assured that 
their trouble would be rewarded by the admission of the patients. 

During the five months that the Hospital was open under the 
arrangements published in your circular of April 22, there were 
forty-one patients admitted. This comparatively small number 
is very far from comprising all who applied for admission. 

There were two reasons why the " arrangements " referred to 
did not succeed in filling up our empty wards. 

First, there was a very prevalent opinion abroad that there 
would be an extra session of the Legislature at an early day, and 
consequently there would be appropriations made for continuing 
the Benevolent Institutions in their usefulness, and thereby an 
opportunity would be afforded for returning those patients who 
had been virtually discharged from the Hospital and sent home 
by the General Assembly, to become charges upon friends and 
neighbors, and walking monuments of the liberality, benevolence, 
and wisdom of the age. 

Another very potent cause for the paucity of numbers was the 
enormous expense necessarily attendant upon the treatment of a 
patient under the " county arrangements." But this could not 
be avoided, and at the same time do impartial justice to the seve- 
ral counties of the State. 

The greater number of the patients discharged from the Hos- 
pital on the 3d day of April last, were placed in the poor houses 
of the several counties ; the remainder were confined in jails and 
out-houses : all disposed of without any reference to their treat- 
ment and cure, but merely for confinement and support. 

There have beer fifty-five applications received since the 5th 
inst., eighteen of which are recent, and for patients who had 
never been under treatment in the Hospital. There were also 
four patients Ijrought to the Hospital solely upon the warrant of 
the clerks of circuit courts. These cases were all refused, not 
on account of want of the proceedings of the required inquest, 
but because the cases were all chronic and incurable. Two of 
them were confirmed epileptics, and the other two had been insane 
txjn or twelve years. 



119 

We have learned from most of the clerks of the counties, and 
from other reliable sources, that applications will be made for 
the readmission of nearly all those patients who were discharged 
in April last. This we anticipated, but it is very evident, that 
they cannot be accommodated, even if a large proportion should 
prove meritorious cases, and we are sure from our own personal 
knowledge that a goodly numl3«r could be greatly benefited, if 
not permanently restored, by further treatment in the Hospital 
but the increased number of recent cases will unfortunately de- 
prive old patients of further opportunities of the benefits derived 
from prolonged medication. 

The experience of nearly five years in the treatment and man- 
agement of the insane has confirmed us in the opinion that the 
State would act wisely in constructing buildings on a scale capa- 
cious enough to accommodate all the insane within her borders. 
Humanity would dictate such a policy, and we think that it can 
very easily be demonstrated that it would be much more eco- 
nomical to the tax-payers than to support the chronic and in- 
curable in the poor houses as is done in many instances now. 

The cost of maintaining insane patients at the county Asy- 
lums, is equal if not greater, than at the Hospital, where there 
is at least a hope of effecting a cure. Then the danger and an- 
noyance of having insane persons among idiots and decrepit 
people, who, as a general rule, comprise the larger number of 
our paupers, is a consideration which should have much weight 
in favor of adopting a general system. 

But the great trouble with our insane who are excluded from 
the wards of the Hospital by reason of the chronic condition of 
their insanity is not to be found at our county Asylums, but is 
more frequently found in private families. Whenever the insane 
become incurable and in consequence are discharged from the 
Hospital, they immediately impose a tax upon some body, and 
not unfrequently upon those who are neither prepared physically, 
mentally nor pecuniarily for their charge. In such cases great 
injury must result to the insane. 

We are in frequent receipt of letters portraying in vivid colors 
the wretched condition of such patients, and begging that they 
may be returned to the Hospital. Of course our replies are nega- 
tive ; we have barely room for those who present the most favor- 



120 

able symptoms for restoration, thus causing- nearly or quite one 
thousand insane persons in the State uncared for, and unpro- 
vided for, so far as doing anything for their mental restoration 
is concerned. It is preposterous to claim that our physicians 
may treat the insane successfully in our county poor houses^ 
when it is well known none of these places are prepared with 
an}'thing to assist and facilitate them in their eiforts. 

There has been an increased feeling manifested in the past 
few years among the philanthropists of the United States for 
enlarging the field for treating and taking care of the insane, 
and as a proof of this disposition;, several of the States have in 
the course of erection buildings of immense capacity for this 
purpose, in addition to those already in successful operation. 

The constitution of our State contains a section which requires 
the General Assembly to provide for maintaining and treating 
the insane. From the language used in that instrument we infer 
that the whole number of insane of the State are meant,^ not a 
part of them, but all of them, whether "curable" or "incurable." 
The constitution certainly contemplates that "iAe insane" shall 
receive support and treatment at the expense of the State. 
There is no distinction made between recent and chronic, all 
alike are entitled to the munificence of the State. This is as it 
should be, for it is well established that many cases denominated 
chronic and incurable by the statutes of our State only require 
time and proper treatment to restore them. There are several 
instances on record in this Institution where patients had been 
pronounced ^^ chronic and incurable" whom we were enabled 
from their peculiar characters to keep in the wards for several 
consecutive years, and who eventually became sufiiciently ra- 
tional to return home and assist their families in making a sup- 
port, when for several years prior to their admission to the Hos- 
pital, they had to be confined in jail or in some room almost 
equally strong. 

If there was room sufficient in this Institution to accommo- 
date more than the recent cases, the instances mentioned above 
might be increased in such numbers as to very materially dimin- 
ish the chronic cases of insanity now rendered miserable for 
want of the means for proper treatment. The friends of many 
of these unfortunate creatures are writing to us almost every 



121 

day, begging to have the privilege of sending their insane to re- 
main over winter, merely to prolong a wretched life, embittered 
in many instances by poverty, but the law interposes and we 
are also compelled to interpose, and deny them admission for 
the want of room. 

The worst cases of insanity and those which give the most 
trouble and anxiety to a family, are those patients who are sub- 
ject to epilepsy. They are generally admitted to be incurable, but 
they may be notwithstanding greatly benefited by Hospital treat- 
ment, especially in their personal habits. They are dangerous, 
too, to life and property, yet the law prefers recent cases, though 
these cases may be inottensive, and give but little or no trouble 
to their friends, while the epileptics, who are always daiiycroas, 
are positively refused a place in this Institution, and are treated 
by the commonwealth as aliens who are not entitled to its pro- 
tection. We mention these facts to show the injustice done a 
very unfortunate portion of our community, when we believe 
that the constitution of the State designed that they should have 
an equal chance for treatment with those whom the law desig- 
nates recent. It is true that patients insane from the effects of 
epilepsy are very diflicult to manage, and are never cured, and 
moreover are always injurious to those patients with whom they 
associate, on account of the fearful shrieks attendant upon epi- 
leptic paroxysms. Notwitstanding these objections are true, we 
think that they could very easily be overcome by constructing 
appropriate buildings especially for the epileptics. This class of 
patients may be treated under the same roof, but not in the same 
wards with other patients. 

" The law for the government of the Indiana Hospital for the 
Insane" is a species of legislative favoritism, which the section 
of the constitution upon which it is based is very far from justi- 
fying, but as the General Assembly by statute has determinetl 
to authorize a selection of patients, and those selections are made 
with reference to effecting the most cures, it is perhaps the best 
law we can have for carrying into effect the present policy. Eut 
justice, we think, would say that a general sysfem should be 
adopted which would accommodate all classes of the insane 
within tlio limits of the State, and with implicit confidence in 
the belief here expressed, that the time is not very far distant 

2 D. J.— y 



122 

wLen the people of Indiana will demand it as a chartered right 
guaranteed to them by the constitution of the State, we leave 
the suhject for your earnest consideration, in full faith that our 
riews will meet your approbation. 

The refusal of the General Assembly to appropriate money to 
gupport the Insane, resulted in an order from your Board author- 
izing the returning of the patients to their respective homes. 
This procedure gave great dissatisfaction to m&nj of the county 
officials, and caused patients to remain in the Hospital for seve- 
ral weeks after the order for removal had been received by the 
clerks; and in one instance we were compelled to return the 
patients to the county at the expense